PLATINUM2024

Equine Advocates, Inc.

Promoting the Humane and Responsible Treatment of Horses

Chatham, NY   |  http://www.equineadvocates.org

Mission

To rescue, protect and prevent the abuse of equines through education, investigation, rescue operations, the dissemination of information to the public and the operation of a horse sanctuary for slaughter-bound, abused and neglected equines.

Notes from the nonprofit

Equine Advocates - Promoting the Humane and Responsible Treatment of Horses. We concentrate our efforts on rescue, sanctuary, education and advocacy. We are working to see an end to the horrific practice of horse slaughter, the end of the brutal PMU (Pregnant Mares Urine) industry, the cruel round-ups of our wild horses and burros, as well as other urgent matters effecting America's horses.

Ruling year info

1996

President & Founder

Susan Wagner

Main address

PO Box 354

Chatham, NY 12037 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

11-3313534

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We focus our work on rescue, sanctuary, humane education and advocacy. There is a need to educate the general public about the issues affecting America's horses and what each person can do to make a difference. Many Americans are unaware that tens of thousands of US-bred horses are slaughtered each year in Canada and Mexico for humane consumption in Europe and Japan. This is a horrific practice. We do not breed our horses here for food. In addition, many are unaware that there is a push to privatize our remaining Wild Horses and Burros so that they can also be sold for slaughter. If this happens, they could be gone forever. Horses are part of our history, our culture and are revered and need to be protected from the horrors of slaughter and other mistreatment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Our 140-acre sanctuary is currently home to 85 horses, ponies, donkeys and mules, most rescued from slaughter, abuse and neglect. Our Equine Care expenses covers feed, hay, bedding, medications, supplements, veterinarian fees, farrier (blacksmith) fees, equine dentist, rehabilitation, hauling costs and rescue operations.  Also included is the staff time to care for our equine population including feeding twice daily, watering, cleaning the stalls, cleaning the fields and repairing the fencing.

We were very honored to receive accreditation from the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries in 2013 and from the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance in 2014.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We welcome the general public to our Humane Education Center to attend classes, seminars and demonstrations on equine issues, care and natural horsemanship. 

We have an educator on staff who has created lesson plans and PowerPoint Presentations for elementary school grades. These classes help fulfill State Learning Standards and the requirements of the New York State Humane Education Law.

In 2019, we hosted over 800 students for humane education. Afterwards, all get to meet our equine residents and learn where they came from and why they needed to be rescued which makes for a much more enjoyable and educational experience. The equine residents are an important part of our Humane Education Program. We have received many lovely testimonials from educators who brought their classes here.

We also host students in grades 6-12 as well as some equine studies college students.

We have also published a children's book titled "Do Horses Sleep Standing Up?"

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from fear and distress

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Most equines here were rescued from slaughter or dire circumstances. It can take a while for them to feel safe but we work with them every day to help them lose their fear from their prior life.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The rescued equines get hay and grain daily and have access to grass. Each paddock has a water trough which is cleaned and maintained daily to keep them free from hunger or thirst.

Number of animals with freedom from discomfort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The rescued equines that call the sanctuary home are monitored regularly and given whatever medications needed to be sure that they are free from discomfort. We also have three rescued goats.

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The rescued equines and 3 goats are monitored several times a day to be sure that they are not injured or ill. We provide medical care & call the vet when needed to ensure they are free from pain.

Number of animals with freedom to express normal behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Horses are herd animals. The rescued equines here at the sanctuary are in the company of other equines and have plenty of space to graze and express normal behavior. The 3 goats live together as well.

Number of full-time staff members per animal

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have a Resident Equine Care Manager, an Assistant Resident Equine Care Manager, a Barn Manager, a Maintenance Manager as well as 4 Farm Workers. We have a total of 12 F/T staff members.

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We currently have 81 rescued horses, ponies, donkeys & mules and 3 rescued goats. They are in sanctuary and will remain here for life.

Number of animals vaccinated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All of our animals, 81 equines and 3 goats, are vaccinated each year, Spring and Fall.

Total dollars of operating costs per animal per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Sanctuary Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our Audited Financial Statement: annual costs for Equine Rescue & Sanctuary including the staff who care for them: 2022 $1,197,921; 2021 $1,145,150; 2020 $965,238; 2019 $887,705 and 2018 923,316

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals are to help see an end to the horrific practice of horse slaughter, an end to the inhumane PMU (pregnant mare's urine) industry, the cruel culling of our wild horses and burros, the end to the urban carriage horse industry and other vital issues facing America's horses.

We hope to education even more people on the above issues and what action they can do when they encounter any equine abuse.

Our Mission is to educate the public. We focus our work on rescue, sanctuary, humane education and advocacy.

We keep the public updated on urgent issues facing America’s equines through our website, social media outlets, our mailings as well as through the press. Also, our Humane Education Program continues to grow and have welcomed more than 800 students to the sanctuary in 2019. We have received many lovely testimonials from the teachers who have participated.

We have resumed our in-person Humane Education Program in March 2022.

We also provide tools on our website for individuals to make a difference and make their voices heard on matters that are most important to them.

Our Humane Education Center can seat 100 attendees and we hold conferences and symposiums here on the sanctuary grounds.

We were the organizers and hosts of the American Equine Summit for several years in our Humane Education Center. We hope to have a Summit again in the not-too-distant future. We brought expert speakers from across the country to discuss the issues facing America's wild and domestic equines and to brainstorm on how to end the brutal slaughter of these majestic animals. These 2-day conferences were videotaped and posted on the web for world-wide viewing. Our 2012 Summit became a catalyst for change as it inspired one of the speakers to meet with then Vice President Joe Biden who then personally added language defunding horse slaughter.

We have helped bring about awareness to the general public about many issues facing America's horses.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Equine Advocates, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Equine Advocates, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeffrey Tucker

Karen Wagner

Susan Wagner

Kelley Watts

Donna Nadeau

Yvette Jackson

Elisa Haworth

Marilyn Sygrove

Ellen Goldner

Regan Backer

Barbara Guarino Lester

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/1/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.