MCW Global

Local Change Through Global Exchange™

aka MCW Global / MCW / Miracle Corners of the World   |   New York, NY   |  www.mcwglobal.org

Mission

MCW Global is a non-profit organization with a vision for communities around the world to achieve greater levels of education, improved health, and increased economic security. Our mission is to address communities’ pressing needs by empowering current leaders and readying leaders of tomorrow. Founded in 1999, MCW Global is based in New York with partner organizations in Africa (Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia). We offer a Young Leaders Program and an Africa Program that focuses on Oral Health Care and Community Development. Our core values include integrity, compassion, accountability, responsibility, and excellence.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Mr. Khalid Elachi

Main address

MCW Global, 102 East 30th Street Lower Level

New York, NY 10016 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Miracle Corners of the World

EIN

11-3548856

NTEE code info

Nonprofit Management (S50)

Economic Development (S30)

Labor Unions/Organizations (J40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Lack of opportunities for education and training, access to oral health care, and economic security.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Young Leaders Program

Preparing young leaders, 18 to 26, from around the world to become change leaders in their communities by giving them the skills, confidence, and networks needed to make change happen.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Non-adult children

Our Africa Program specializes in Oral Health Care, aiming to achieve improved oral health status for all Tanzanians; and, Community Development, aiming to develop and support community centers in under-served communities as spaces for vocational training, entrepreneurship, and social services. Today, we have centers in Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to empower current leaders and leaders of tomorrow to create opportunities for greater levels of education, improved health (particularly oral health care prevention and education), and increased economic security.

We make this happen through two primary program areas: our Young Leaders Program and our Africa Program, which focuses on Oral Health Care and Community Development).

Our Young Leaders Program aims to empower and support young leaders to become leaders of positive change in their community.

Our Africa Program focuses on focuses on Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. From upgrading the infrastructure of Tanzania’s only dental school to helping Rwandans and Zambians develop employable skills for today’s marketplace, we are committed to addressing communities’ needs by investing in leadership.

With regard to our Young Leaders Program, we have over 800 alumni in 66 countries, who have participated in one of our young leaders projects. Today, we have a year long Young Access Leaders Program that focuses on leadership, global citizenship, and vision planning. It begins with a 10-day intensive retreat that prepares participants, 18 to 26, to become leaders of positive change in their community. (To date, we have held 21 summer retreats since our founding in 1999).

During the program, participants go through the process of identifying an issue facing their community and then producing an actionable plan that can be implemented in their own communities. Participants are paired with alumni, who will guide and mentor them during the year, aiming to help them transform passion into action. Participants will also hear about the experiences of a range of experts from academia, civil society, development, and the pubic and private sectors through a series of workshops, discussions and experiential learning.

Drawing on this experience, we also organize Young Leaders Regional Conferences. Past conferences have been held in Jerusalem, Egypt, and Kyrgyzstan.

To support our alumni, we support The Alumni Ventures Fund, which offers graduates of our international Young Leaders Access Program a unique opportunity to turn their vision plans into concrete community-based projects with a start-up grant of up to $5,000 and a year of professional mentorship. With 13 recipients since the Fund’s founding in 2009, AVF has helped young leaders achieve their personal goals of being changemakers in their communities.

With regard to our Africa Program, MCW Global is based in New York with affiliate organizations in Africa (Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia). Each one of our affiliate organizations is led by a local Board of Directors and Leadership Team, including a Country Manager and Program Officers), who oversee the development and execution of the country plan. In Tanzania, we focus on Oral Health Care; and, in Rwanda and Zambia, we focus on Vocational Training, such as sewing/tailoring and IT training, as well as social programs addressing community needs, such as literacy.

Reach in 2018:

o Over 3,000 young people from around the world applied to our Young Leaders Access Program
o 2 new recipients of the Alumni Ventures Fund -- one in Kenya and one in Brazil
o 595 people participated in one of our Vocational Training Programs in Rwanda or Zambia
o 105 people participated in our youth programs in Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia
o Over 9,000 people, mainly primary school children, received dental treatment in 2018 alone in Tanzania
o 118 children participated in our literacy program in Zambia and, as a result, 26 were reintegrated into the school system
o 800 young leaders from 66 countries around the world
o 13 Alumni Venture Fund recipients from 6 countries

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Young Leaders and Community Members who go through our programs receive surveys (entry, mid, and exit) to share feedback. The survey asks a range of multiple choice and open ended questions with room for comments.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

MCW Global
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MCW Global

Board of directors
as of 07/07/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Edward Bergman

Proxima Hospitality Group

Paul Bergman

Fertilaqua

Anna Condoulis

NYU SCPS

Mark Kemper

North Atlantic Region, UPS

Humera Qazi

KPMG, LLP

Charles Robbins, PhD

Stony Brook University

Rich Miranda Miranda

Henry Schein, Inc.

Kabinga Pande

MC-Zambia Founder

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Unknown
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.