CHRIST'S HOPE INTERNATIONAL

Caring for the AIDS affected Child

Traverse City, MI   |  www.christshope.org

Mission

Bringing the life changing message of Jesus Christ to children and families infected with and affected by HIV and AIDS. Through discipling and care-giving, presenting them perfect in Jesus Christ.

Ruling year info

2003

Principal Officer

David Kase

Main address

PO Box 2238

Traverse City, MI 49685 USA

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EIN

11-3676998

NTEE code info

Religious Leadership, Youth Development (O55)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The most recent estimate from UNAIDS shows that there are approximately 5,000 new cases of AIDS per day, most of which occur in Africa. Every year roughly one million people die of AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, the sickness that occurs when HIV is left untreated). We have the opportunity to change the lives of millions of kids, many of whom are orphans, have parents with HIV/AIDS, or are ill themselves. These children have a lot to worry about. Christ’s Hope works with them and their families to give them a better future. We are answering God’s call to take care of the orphan and widow (James 1:27).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Orphan and Vulnerable Children

Caring for AIDS effected child.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

God's design for Sex, Marriage and Gender Roles. We know that the surest way to avoid unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection/disease is to abstain from sex outside of marriage ....... but God's plan is greater than that!

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Ministry CarePoint model implemented by Christ's Hope empowers AIDS affected orphaned and vulnerable children live with extended and foster families in their community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

ECFA 2021

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Children affected by AIDS are often stigmatized and marginalized by society and their communities, abandoned and left to live on the streets or in underfunded orphanages severed from their extended family and their community. Our model is to reach the most vulnerable children who often are pushed into orphanages, the streets, or neglected due mainly to poverty. By coming along side families we provide support through our Ministry CarePoints to provide care in five critical areas of a child's life. Through this intervention children remain in families, have access to education, food stability, medical care, spiritual care,and emotional and social development.

Our Strategy revolves around our Ministry CarePoints. A Ministry CarePoint is a strategically located center within a community with a high AIDS infection rate. CarePoints provide a place where children can receive the physical, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual care they need. In doing so, this ensures that orphaned and vulnerable children can live with an extended family member.

Christ’s Hope is focused on children affected by AIDS to help them be healthy, and well-trained in their livelihood as adults. Then they will be able to show others in their community how to break the cycle of poverty, starting with their own families. Christ’s Hope also teaches these children about the amazing, life-changing message of Jesus Christ.

We very strongly believe in the capabilities of our local leadership and staff members. Africans lead our ministry predominantly. Each of our staff members and CareGivers to have at least a high school education and many have college degrees.

The ministry in Africa is supported through our Church Partner model. Each individual Ministry CarePoint is partnered with a church in Europe or North America who commit to sponsoring each of the 50 children on a monthly basis. This allows the Ministry CarePoint to be sustained and gives the church partner a chance to build a relationship with the children in the Ministry Carepoint through praying, advocating, and sending short-term teams to serve.

Our model of care provides a low ratio of children to caregiver, that allows a strong monitoring and mentoring opportunity with the child and the familiy. The children attend the Ministry CarePoint mulitple times each week and spend on average ten hours a week in the program.

Through dozens of Ministry CarePoints over 1500 children are in our program. Our goal is to reach 3000 children in the next two years.

Families and individuals all over the world sponsor nearly 85% of those children monthly. Our goal is to have that percentage up to 100%. . We serve 234,00 meals to children annually, spend 390,000 hours in one on one mentoring, 5200 hygiene packs distributed, 2100 school unfiorms and shoes, and much more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Orphaned and vulnerable children in extreme poverty in Africa and their families.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Developed a new Life Skill center as a result of the empathy gained from interviews with teenagers we serve. Providing a variety of life skills, vocational skills, money management training, micro enterprise opportunities.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Has empowered the youth we serve to have greater say in the program and services we provide and the frequency in which we do it.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

CHRIST'S HOPE INTERNATIONAL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CHRIST'S HOPE INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 5/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Daryl Gingell

Borg

Term: 2017 - 2021

Bud Abt

Northland Church

David Kase

US Director, Christ's Hope USA

Tim Patton

George Udvari

Joe Marton

Kathy Franz

Daryl Gingell

Borg Warner

Sonia Williams

Vogt Power International

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/14/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.