PLATINUM2023

Homeless Alliance

Rallying our community to end homelessness

Oklahoma City, OK   |  http://www.homelessalliance.org/

Mission

The Homeless Alliance's mission is to rally our community to end homelessness. We seek to end long-term homelessness in OKC by building the capacity of the community through collaboration with other agencies, identifying and filling gaps in homeless services, bringing nationally-recognized best practices to the community, and working to build a system that is more efficient, rational, and caring.

Ruling year info

2004

Principal Officer

Dan Straughan

Main address

1724 NW 4th Street

Oklahoma City, OK 73106 USA

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Formerly known as

NA

EIN

11-3718005

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (L01)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In 2022, there were a total of 1,339 “countable” people who were experiencing homelessness in Oklahoma City on the night of the Point in Time count.​ 50% were staying in an emergency shelter, 15% in transitional or supportive housing, and 35% were unsheltered (living outside or in a place not meant for long term habitation like a car). This count does not include those who are living in a hotel or are "couch homeless." While these Point in Time count numbers provide good data to track trends over long periods of time, we have a tool that tracks service use and numbers on a daily basis. Throughout the year of 2022, 12,340 people were served by programs that record data in this Homeless Management Information System.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WestTown Resource Center

It is exceedingly rare to find an individual or family whose homelessness can be laid to a single factor like loss of a job.  Much more often, the cause is multifaceted, complex and includes mental illness, substance abuse, lack of educational attainment, the chains of generational poverty, developmental issues, legal problems, physical disabilities, the list can go on and on.  The Center was built in 2011 to provide a "one-stop shop" for homeless & at-risk individuals & families to access the wide variety of services they may need to end or prevent their homelessness & achieve long-term stability in their lives. Weekly, existing case managers from various government, faith-based & nonprofit agencies meet to coordinate case management, share information about services their individual client can utilize & share ideas and resources for their clients.  This Coordinated Case Management (CCM) has proven effective and efficient and is being duplicated in other service areas.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Day Shelter is a 13,000-square-foot facility which opened August 2011 with a commercial kitchen serving breakfast and lunch, showers, pet kennels, computer workstations, barbershop/salon, and classroom space for AA and NA classes, devotionals, art classes and other educational opportunities. The Day Shelter currently serves an average of 262 guests each day, about 70% of whom are unsheltered or “street homeless.” The Day Shelter also provides a place where local agencies seeking to provide services to the homeless can engage with them in a safe, welcoming environment. In 2022, the Day Shelter served 11,555 unduplicated guests.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) is the networked computer database used by homeless-serving agencies in central Oklahoma to collect and report on service utilization and client- and program-level outcomes. Every community receiving funds from the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is required to have a HMIS that meets HUD's criteria for data collected and reported. Moreover, every agency receiving funds from HUD is required to utilize their community's HMIS. In Oklahoma City, HMIS is managed by the Homeless Alliance with the goal and purpose to collect HUD-required data elements on homeless and at-risk clients and report aggregate data to HUD annually. The Homeless Alliance uses the system to aggregate data across agencies and use that information to identify gaps in service and unmet community needs and to provide accurate data on homelessness to stakeholders and the broader community.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Our main goal is to build the capacity of the community to improve care for people experiencing homelessness by facilitating collaboration, encouraging the use of best practices, and seeking to make the entire continuum of care for the homeless more efficient, more effective, more client-centered, and more outcome-focused. There are more than 100 government, faith-based, and nonprofit agencies serving the homeless in Oklahoma City at some level. The purpose of the capacity building program is to facilitate collaboration among these diverse entities and take a system-level approach to ending homelessness in our community.

Population(s) Served

Not everyone can walk in somewhere and get a job. Sometimes there are barriers like not having an ID, not having daily access to showers or clean clothing, transportation, work history, background issues, or just the challenge of living in crisis mode and being focused on daily survival.

The Curbside Chronicle is Oklahoma City's “street paper,” created in 2013 to provide both a voice and employment opportunities for people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. In addition to providing a source of income, the program works with vendors to break down barriers to traditional employment and develop time management, money management and social skills. You can purchase this month's magazine from vendors in green vests around town.

Curbside Flowers and Curbside Apparel provide additional paid employment opportunities for our magazine vendors as they transition out of homelessness, and Sasquatch Shaved Ice employs at-risk youth. Find us on social media to learn more!

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

United Way of Central Oklahoma 2004

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes newly housed and people remaining in our housing programs

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Day Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Breakfast and lunch are served weekdays in our Day Shelter

Number of hours of paid supportive employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Curbside Enterprises

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual hours with Curbside Flowers and Sasquatch Shaved Ice

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Homeless Alliance works to end long-term homelessness in Oklahoma City by building the capacity of the community through collaboration with other agencies, identifying and filling gaps in homeless services, bringing nationally-recognized best practices to the community, and working to build a system that is more efficient, rationale, and caring.
We believe that all our neighbors deserve the dignity of a place to call home. We understand that there are many barriers for people who have experienced homelessness. We work to eliminate those by meeting immediate needs, cultivating trust, connecting with housing, and providing supportive employment opportunities.

The Homeless Alliance operates several housing programs for individuals and families with children, coordinates a community effort to house veterans and people who are chronically homeless, operates the IT infrastructure used by homeless-serving agencies in central Oklahoma, and publishes The Curbside Chronicle, a magazine that provides a voice and legitimate source of income for people who are homeless.

The Homeless Alliance owns and operates the WestTown Homeless Resource Campus which includes a Resource Center with offices for multiple nonprofit and government agencies, a housing complex for veterans and people who were chronically homeless, and a Day Shelter that serves an average of 300 people each day. The Day Shelter serves breakfast and lunch, provides showers, offers access to computers, phone, and mail, and provides access to needed services including mental and physical healthcare, budgeting assistance, legal support, and multiple classes and programs. For those people who can't go to a homeless shelter because they have a companion animal from which they will not be parted, the Day Shelter removes that barrier by offering a kennel, complete with pet food and access to veterinary services, so that people with pets aren't shut out of the system of care.

The Homeless Alliance plays a unique role in central Oklahoma's work to end homelessness; building the capacity of all providers through facilitating collaboration and best practices.

The Homeless Alliance facilitates a host of projects with more than 50 government, faith-based, and nonprofit agencies serving people who are homeless in central Oklahoma. From working with all shelters in Oklahoma City to develop community standards for shelters, to building the information technology used by homeless serving agencies to measure client- and program-level outcomes, to building the WestTown Homeless Resources Campus with professional staff from 30 government, faith-based, and non-profit agencies on one site, the Homeless Alliance has consistently demonstrated our commitment to collaboration and innovation.

From the time the organization was founded in 2004, it began by visiting other communities that had successfully implemented coordinated systems and studying the strategies used to drastically reduce their homeless populations. We have launched and incubated new initiatives and coordinated local research of the homeless population throughout our history. And we now operate the city's only Resource Campus for the homeless.

The Homeless Alliance has seen extensive growth in the services and housing opportunities we have been able to offer people experiencing homelessness in the past several years. As a result, we have seen an increase in the number of people being housed and housing retention rates.

In 2022, our programs and collaborative initiatives housed 835 new people in Oklahoma City (includes families with children, veterans, and chronic homeless). In 2022, the Day Shelter served 11,555 unduplicated guests and provided 75,484 meals and 16,261 showers.

Financials

Homeless Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Homeless Alliance

Board of directors
as of 06/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Julie Porter Scott

Yelp

Term: 2022 - 2023

Julie Porter Scott

YelpOKC

Frank Turner

Turner Management Inc.

Theresa Seitz

OG&E

Sarah Bytyqi

Verbode

Christian Guzzy

Hartzog Conger

Stefan Kovash

Artist

Jennifer Lyles

CPA, RSM US

Suzy Lytle

Sandy Beaches Software

Steve Raybourn

Raydon Exploration

Pooja Singhal

MD, SSM Health

Jordan Sowers

Enterprise Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/29/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/05/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.