UNITED STATES GOLF ASSOCIATION HQ

aka USGA   |   Liberty Corner, NJ   |  www.usga.org

Mission

The USGA is a nonprofit organization that celebrates, serves and advances the game of golf. Founded in 1894, we conduct many of golf’s premier professional and amateur championships, including the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open. With The R&A, we govern the sport via a global set of playing, equipment, handicapping and amateur status rules. The USGA campus in Liberty Corner, New Jersey, is home to the Association’s Research and Test Center, where science and innovation are fueling a healthy and sustainable game for the future. The campus is also home to the USGA Golf Museum, where we honor the game by curating the world’s most comprehensive archive of golf artifacts. To learn more, visit usga.org.

Ruling year info

1974

COO

Mr. Mike Davis

Main address

77 Liberty Corner Road

Liberty Corner, NJ 07938 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1427105

NTEE code info

Amateur Sports Competitions (N70)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Preserving Golf's Future: The USGA has been a leader in fostering a deep appreciation for the game of golf since 1894. For 125 years, the USGA has honored and served the game, lifting up its timeless values and celebrating its enduring traditions. We are committed to these efforts because we love and respect all that the game stands for, but more importantly because we want golf to be relevant and to flourish for generations to come.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Championships

Each year the USGA fosters national and international amateur sports competition by conducting ten national amateur golf championships and three national open golf championship which are open to both amateur and professional golfers. The USGA also sponsors teams for four regularly scheduled international amateur golf competitions.  Over 35,000 entrants participate in USGA championships.

Population(s) Served

Each year the USGA provides support and educational materials to people who elect to become affiliated with the USGA by enrolling in its Members Program.  Such educational materials include publications about the Rules of Golf, USGA Championships and a wide variety of other golf topics.  Over 700,000 people are enrolled in the USGA Members Program.

Population(s) Served

Each year USGA staff agronomists provide turfgrass advisory services (TAS) to over 1,200 golf clubs and courses throughout the United States and abroad.  Additionally, the USGA Green Section provides educational materials to golf course superitendents and others.  The USGA also provides grants to colleges and univbersities.  Such grants are used to finance turfgrass research and environmental research which may benefit golf courses.

Population(s) Served

Each year the USGA provides a variety of other services including rules of golf education, amateur status, equipment standards & testing, handicap activities, course rating, public information & education, and state & regional golf association support.  The USGA also provides grants to state and regional golf associations.  Such grants are used to finance golf administration internships.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Future of Golf Requires Investment:
The USGA recognizes its important responsibility to pass on the game and its traditions to future generations. At the same time, we acknowledge that our efforts can and will be stronger with the support of others who share our vision of stewardship. The USGA Foundation strives to be a catalyst that harnesses and leverages the collective support of the golf community to broaden and strengthen the game. We cannot do this important work alone. Through the Foundation, and with outside financial support, the USGA can advance, expand and broaden golf for all those who love and play it.
The USGA has identified three broad priorities for our fundraising efforts. With generous support from our donors, we will invest in:
Preserving and Celebrating Golf History
Enhancing the Amateur Golf Experience
Driving Innovation to Improve the Golf Experience

The USGA Gives Back in Everything We Do:
As a mission-driven, nonprofit organization, the USGA makes significant investments in the game thanks to the U.S. Open and our other revenue streams (Broadcast Rights, Corporate Partnerships, Membership Program and others). The USGA reinvests this revenue in the game year-after-year. Our primary focus is to conduct premier championships that inspire golfers and golf fans throughout the world; making the game more enjoyable and accessible to all; providing a modern and approachable structure to ensure the game remains fair and fun; and enabling the long-term health and sustainability of golf courses and the game itself.

Philanthropy will empower the USGA to advance the game’s growth, future relevance and sustainability. The USGA Foundation was created to secure a consistent stream of philanthropic support to help ensure that we can expand our mission to champion and advance the game.

Driving Impact Takes Commitment:
The USGA Foundation makes an impact on golf by investing critical resources back into the game. We do so by directing funding and support to core areas that advance the game’s long-term health. Every dollar we spend will count, because everything we do is for the good of the game. The overarching goal of the Foundation is to invest funds in a manner that balances the current needs of the organization with those of future generations of golfers.

The Museum and Library collections are the world’s largest and most significant containing 75,000 catalogued artifacts, 750,000 photographs, 200,000 hours of footage and more than 100,000 library items in more than 25 languages that document the history of the game from its origins to the present.

Since 1894, the USGA has led the way in fostering amateur golf, supporting and enhancing the game for all golfers, from their introduction to the game to the highest levels of competition. Providing pathways for youths to learn and experience the game has been a priority for the USGA for more than 50 years. Our support of The First Tee and Drive, Chip and Putt helps ensure that kids of all ages and backgrounds have access to programs that help them to develop the fundamental skills required to play the game. Since its inception in 1996, LPGA-USGA Girls Golf has provided an opportunity for girls, ages 7 to 17, to play the game in a fun and supportive environment. While developing competitive golfers is not the purpose of the program, the playing achievements of Girls Golf alumni continue to demonstrate its success in introducing the game to young women.

The USGA invests around $10M annually in the economic and environmental sustainability of golf courses because the game needs them to thrive. The USGA believes that all golfers should have a high-quality experience that is enjoyable, affordable and compatible with the modern world and our busy lives. The USGA is at the forefront of researching and developing solutions that can enhance a golfer’s experience while ensuring that a player’s skill, not technology, is the overriding factor in his or her success. For 100 years, the USGA’s Green Section has been working to advance the science of golf course management, working with course superintendents to ensure that courses consistently provide high quality experiences and are at the same time economically and ecologically sustainable. The Turfgrass and Environmental Research Program was founded in 1983 to support the development of new varieties of sustainable turfgrass and to identify and promote best practices that help golf courses be good partners for communities and the environment.

Financials

UNITED STATES GOLF ASSOCIATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UNITED STATES GOLF ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 3/26/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Newell

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Term: 2017 - 2019

Stuart Francis

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Martha Lang

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Thomas Barkin

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Dick Shortz

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Tony Anderson

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Deborah Majoras

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Fred Perpall

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Michael Bailey

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Stephen Beebe

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Paul Brown

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Kendra Graham

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Robert Kain

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Nick Price

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Sharon Ritchey

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

William Siart

Volunteer - United States Golf Association

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No