Greater New York Councils, Boy Scouts of America

New York, NY   |  www.nycscouting.org

Mission

The Greater New York Councils, Boy Scouts of America has helped over five million young people become "Prepared for Life." The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetime by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. The vision of the Greater New York Councils is to serve boys and girls throughout the diverse communities of New York City and to help them prepare for success in school, career, and life.

Ruling year info

1965

Scout Executive and CEO

Mr. Ethan Draddy

Main address

475 Riverside Drive, Suite 600

New York, NY 10115 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1624015

NTEE code info

Boy Scouts (O41)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

First Aid Training (M41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Young people in New York City face a lot of challenges as they learn and grow. Poverty, homelessness, and gang violence are just some of the obstacles to reaching their full potential. The achievement gap in the low-income neighborhoods we serve in reading and math comprehension, on-time high school graduation, and college acceptance is stubbornly persistent, particularly for Black and Hispanic students. To address this, Scouting & Exploring programs use a Positive Youth Development approach to helping young people use the assets they have. This approach is based on the premise that all youth have strengths to draw upon and a capacity for positive change. If they are offered the right resources and supports, they can develop a pathway to a successful future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

education

Cub Scouts: boys and girls in first through fifth grades learn important life skills such as teamwork, financial literacy, fitness and nutrition, while working with caring mentors. Hands-on activities such as the Pinewood Derby promote creativity and teach new skills, while field trips help Scouts explore our city’s culture and environment.

Scouts BSA (formerly Boy Scouts) : boys and girls from sixth grade to age 18 meet weekly for outdoor activities, life skills, fitness, and character development. The merit badge system helps Scouts explore sciences, crafts, sports, and future careers.

Scoutreach: boys and girls in low-income, high-risk neighborhoods participate in a year-round Cub Scouting program with paid program leaders at no cost to struggling families. Scoutreach offers at-risk boys a safe haven year-round in fun and educational activities.

Exploring: young men and women ages 14-20 engage in this worksite-based career education program offering a wide variety of industry placements with prestigious partners in law enforcement, health care, real estate, public administration, and finance. Business professionals provide mentoring, firsthand industry experience, and lead hands-on workplace projects to help students prepare for the career of their choice.

Venturing: Young men and women ages 14-20 learn about leadership and teamwork through outdoor activities that emphasize leadership, fitness, ecology, and service. Co-ed Venturing Crews provide opportunities for high school students to build mature peer relationships while having fun.

Outdoor Programming: The Greater New York Councils owns and operates three nationally recognized camp faculties that offer outdoor adventures, fitness activities, and environmental education year-round: Camp Pouch on Staten Island, Alpine Scout Camp in New Jersey and the Ten Mile River Scout Reservation in upstate New York.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We recruit and train adult volunteers to mentor our youth each year.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of youth participants in 2019 enrolled.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices. The vision of the Greater New York Councils is to serve kids throughout the diverse communities of New York City and to help them to prepare for success in school, career, and life.

We do this through weekly after-school meetings, weekend events, and 7-days-a-week during summer camp experiences. We operate 12 months of the year. Additional activities include community service projects, field trips to New York City cultural attractions, Camporees, S.T.E.M. programs, Family Fun weekends, and much more.

Scouting and Exploring changes lives, showing young people proven pathways to success in school and the world of work. Our programs teach both the hard and soft skills needed to succeed in the 21st century global economy, as well as encourage youth to invest in themselves and give back to their communities.

Scouting is a time-tested approach to youth development, over a century in-the-making. The Greater New York Councils, Boy Scouts of America has helped over five million young people become “Prepared for Life.” Young people need more positive adult role models as well as safe after-school and summer education and enrichment opportunities. Our trained and caring leaders offer character education and a variety of year-round programs to help youth prepare for a productive future.

Recent accomplishments include:
We served over 20,000 boys and girls ages 5-20 throughout the five boroughs of New York City
Engaged and trained over 3,600 adult volunteers to mentor our youth
Our three iconic camps hosted over 75,000 visits to camp from children and adults throughout the year, including 7,500 boys and girls who spend a week at summer camp.
Our youth and volunteers contribute over 250,000 hours of community service annually.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We heard from parents of girls in recent years that they would welcome the opportunity to enroll their daughters in the same program of Scouting that their sons enjoyed. It would enable families to spend more time together and enable the girls to join the program with all of the benefits their brothers had. As an organization, the Boy Scouts of America conducted surveys of stakeholders, and locally we also held town halls to gather feedback. In 2018 we welcomed girls into Cub Scouts for the first time, and in 2020, we celebrated our first class of female Eagle Scouts!

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Greater New York Councils, Boy Scouts of America
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Greater New York Councils, Boy Scouts of America

Board of directors
as of 12/11/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Raymond Quartararo

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Term: 2016 - 2017

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/10/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data