PLATINUM2023

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, NEW YORK SECTION

A Faith in the Future. A Belief in Action

aka National Council of Jewish Women New York (NCJW NY)   |   New York, NY   |  www.ncjwny.org

Mission

National Council of Jewish Women New York Section (NCJW NY) is a grassroots organization of volunteers and advocates who turn progressive ideals into action. Inspired by Jewish values, NCJW NY strives for social justice by improving the quality of life for women, children, and families and by safeguarding individual rights and freedoms.

Ruling year info

1949

Principal Officer

Ms. Andrea Salwen Kopel

Main address

241 West 72nd Street

New York, NY 10023 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1624132

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

America faces many societal challenges including poverty, hunger, racial, sexuality, and gender identity discrimination, among many other forms of injustice. We have identified two broad gaps in society where our work and interventions have a clear impact. 1) The need to advance and protect the well-being of women in American society 2) The need to advance, support, and protect the needs of vulnerable populations in our community At NCJW NY we create social change by providing meaningful experiences that foster women’s leadership through opportunities for direct service and grassroots advocacy. Our initiatives benefit thousands of New Yorkers, such as our literacy program for economically disadvantaged school children; our support and enrichment programs for isolated seniors; the Food Pantry and Community Kitchen that feed over 35,000 adults and children annually; and our advocacy work that gives a voice to the voiceless on vital issues at the city, state, and federal level.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NCJW NY Hunger Program

Over one million New Yorkers have difficulty affording food. They are out-of-work families with children, elderly people who live alone, and the working poor who cannot afford to pay for both rent and food. They are also the homeless who live in shelters or on the streets. In response, our programs provide nutritious and wholesome food served in a friendly, hospitable manner. Our Monday Food Pantry provides a three-day emergency supply of both fresh produce and shelf-stable groceries to families in need, and our twice-weekly Community Kitchen provides a hot, delicious meal to all who need it. In FY 2018, our Hunger Program served more than 30,000 individuals, and over 190,000 meals.

Our dedicated volunteers give our program an unmatched level of personal interaction and service, ensuring that the experience is welcoming and dignified for all of our clients. Our volunteers learn about our client’s lives and how to best help them break the cycle of hunger and poverty. Additionally, our staff social worker provides clients with on-site counseling, information and referrals regarding challenges like housing, employment, and health insurance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

CLL is a unique program for active seniors in New York City that combats social isolation, improves social connectivity, and engages older adults in activities that feed the mind, body, and soul. CLL offers a plethora of opportunities for older adults seeking to learn new skills, build community, and lead fulfilling lives.

From art and exercise classes to discussion groups to free and discounted tickets to the city’s arts and cultural events, CLL keeps our participants engaged, growing, and learning, helping them to defy society’s stereotypes about aging and its effects on mind and body. We are committed to providing support and partnership to our seniors. Our on-site social worker offers resources and referrals to help elders deal with the inevitable challenges of growing older. CLL is one of the few “senior centers” in New York City that offers best-in-class programming and resources to inspire healthy aging.

We respond to the needs of our participants and to pursue our mission to deliver high-quality programming that feeds the minds and souls of the aging population in New York City. The value of CLL cannot be underestimated—access to our programs and services, as well as the general sense of community found at CLL, provides meaning and purpose to the lives of local seniors.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

The Pregnancy Loss Support Program (PLSP), a non-sectarian program of the National Council of Jewish Women NY Section, provides comfort and validation for parents who have suffered miscarriage, stillbirth, and newborn death. Since 1983, our professionally trained Volunteer Counselors have offered telephone counseling to grieving parents nationwide and have facilitated our New York Metropolitan area support group, free of charge. Our trained Volunteer Counselors are a self-selecting group who go through our support program and are empowered to give back to others and honor their babies by imparting compassion and healing hope to other grieving parents. All of the volunteers act under the guidance, training, and auspices of the program social worker and PLSP program coordinator who facilitate their activities.

Population(s) Served
Parents

The Reading Tutors program nurtures a love of books and reading, and boosts confidence in literacy skills for economically disadvantaged school children in kindergarten through fifth grade. Volunteers seeking to become Reading Tutors are carefully screened, interviewed and trained by seasoned educators on the Children’s Literacy committee. Both students and tutors commit to individual weekly 30-minute tutoring sessions for the entire school year, enabling a trusting relationship to develop and allowing tutors to become optimally invested in each child’s progress. Each week, tutors bring a selection of age-appropriate books, chosen to appeal to each child’s interests. Students are encouraged to take books home with them once they have completed them, thus building a home library that instills pride and promotes continued reading practice throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Our annual Back 2 School Store debuted in 2015, and it provides children with everything they need to go back to school with pride, confidence, and enthusiasm. One day every summer, NCJW NY’s Council House is transformed into a very special department store, to provide each child with a brand new outfit (shirt, pants, parka, sneakers, underwear and socks) as well as a backpack filled with school supplies, entirely free of charge. Best of all, the children chose each item themselves, based on their own tastes and styles. While children shop with their volunteer personal shoppers, parents explore the Resource Center, where representatives from public and private agencies will be on hand to inform parents about resources available in the community to support their family’s health, learning, and growth.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

NCJW NY provides a unique platform for women to activate their commitment to social justice through the lens of Jewish values and Jewish teachings. At its very core, NCJW NY is about developing Jewish women’s leadership through education, skills training, and opportunities for meaningful volunteer service and direct grassroots advocacy. We hope to continue to grow our community of volunteers and advocates into an even more powerful force for positive change, with a vision of creating a city in which all women, children, and families have equal rights, equal opportunities, and equal protection.

NCJW NY’s Advocacy Leadership Committee (ALC) is a multi-generational, interfaith group of women committed to affecting social change. They are diverse, from all different professions and walks of life, bringing varied skills and points of view to the Committee’s endeavors. In partnership with NCJW NY’s professional staff, ALC volunteers work to educate the community and to affect policy at the local, state, and federal level.

The ALC serves as leaders and conveners of a wide network of grassroots advocates. Toward this end, the ALC organizes panel discussions, film screenings, salons, and lobby visits. Committee members have an opportunity to develop an expertise in one or more issues of their choosing; to take a leadership role in setting the advocacy agenda; and develop the strategy to achieve the goals we set. In doing so, we train women to become leaders and provide opportunities to exert leadership.

While there are many worthy issues of advocating for, the ALC has chosen to focus on a number of critical issues including Anti-Sex Trafficking; Reproductive Rights, Justice, and Gender Equality; Economic Justice, with a focus on Hunger and Nutrition; and Immigration and Refugee Rights. The ALC, along with other NCJW NY advocates, engage in a variety of tactics to achieve change, including:

• Local and State lobby visits with elected officials
• Presence at Marches and Rallies including the NYC Women’s March, and the March for our Lives, among others
• Encouraging individuals to call or write their local, state, and federal legislators
• Creative communication strategies, like Letters to the Editor and petitions
• Direct outreach to affected populations

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Volunteer Recognition Award 2010

Union Settlement Community Center

Certificate of Appreciation 2007

Citizen’s Advice Bureau

Proclamation for promoting computer literacy for older adults 2004

New York City Council

Nov 4th declared NCJW NY Day 2004

NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

NCJW NY Hunger Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of client visits to the Food Pantry

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

NCJW NY Hunger Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Inspired by Jewish values, the National Council of Jewish Women New York is a grassroots network of volunteers and advocates who turn progressive ideals into action and continually strive for social justice by championing the needs of, and improving the quality of life for society's most vulnerable citizens – women, children, families, and the elderly. For 130 years, NCJW NY has been fostering women's leadership and addressing the city's inequities through both direct social services and advocacy for systemic change.

NCJW NY provides a unique platform for women to activate their commitment to social justice through the lens of Jewish values and Jewish teachings. At its very core, NCJW NY is about developing Jewish women's leadership through education, skills training, and opportunities for meaningful volunteer service and direct grassroots advocacy. We hope to continue to grow our community of volunteers and advocates into an even more powerful force for positive change.

To solve the most pressing issues facing our society, NCJW NY takes a multifaceted approach to social change. Rather than working from one angle, we use a three-pronged approach of advocacy, education, and direct service—all three of which are necessary for significant social impact. We address the needs of today through our direct service programs, and we address the needs of tomorrow through our education and advocacy efforts. By utilizing multiple interventions and a hyper-local approach, we have a greater chance for long-term progress— as there is no “one size fits all” solution to systemic inequities. Problems and solutions are not static, and thus require a dynamic approach. NCJW NY prides itself as a nimble and adaptable organization; as new needs or gaps are identified, we work to find a solution and implement any necessary changes to make it happen.

NCJW NY is highly regarded as an effective advocacy partner, grassroots organizer, and community service provider and is unique in its commitment to meaningful volunteer engagement and leadership. We uplift the voices, power, and leadership of women from all walks of life through advocacy and education; and mobilize volunteers to address the most pressing issues in society, securing the immediate needs of the most vulnerable in our community including women, children and seniors. NCJW NY's ultra-lean staff of ten is supplemented by nearly 400 volunteers. Mobilizing the skills, ideas, energy and compassion of our volunteers, we have been able to make a lasting impact on individuals and our community.

We run nearly a dozen of ongoing programs each year which engage and empower our community. Our hunger program continues to feed nearly 40,000 New Yorkers per year; we have engaged and improved the quality of life for over 500 seniors every year; we outfitted nearly 200 disadvantaged youth with new clothes and supplies for the school year. Our depth and breadth of programming is great--as we continue to identify needs in our community--we know we will continue to have an impact.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, NEW YORK SECTION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, NEW YORK SECTION

Board of directors
as of 04/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Kim Chirls

Retired: Thomson Reuters, Lead Project Manager for large, global technology projects

Gail Hochman

Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents, Inc.

Susan Sack

Robin Hood Foundation

Karol Todrys

No Affiliation

Meredith Barnett

No Affiliation

Suzanne Reisman

No Affiliation

Lisa Dell

No Affiliation

Lisa Denby

Managed Solutions

Wendy Harrison Hashmall

No Affiliation

Heidi Lurensky

Marlene Meyerson JCC

Elaine Mandelbaum

Interactive Brokers

Brooke Meltzer

No Affiliation

Susan Siegel

No Affiliation

Lisa Watts

Latham & Watkins

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/17/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.