PLATINUM2024

The Floating Hospital, Inc.

Keeping families afloat since 1866

aka The Floating Hospital; TFH   |   New York, NY   |  https://www.thefloatinghospital.org/

Mission

The Floating Hospital provides high-quality healthcare to anyone who needs it regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, immigration or insurance status, or the ability to pay. It is New York City's largest charity healthcare organization and only FQHC with a dedicated focus on families living with homelessness. By providing unrestricted medical care in tandem with health education and social support to vulnerable New York City families, The Floating Hospital aims to ensure those most in need have the ability to thrive, not just survive.

Notes from the nonprofit

Through its outreach to 300+ NYC family homeless shelters and domestic violence safe houses, low-income community centers and in-school programming in partnership with NYC Dept. of Education, The Floating Hospital goes to where the need is, as it has done from its inception in 1866. In 2022, the organization served 26,890 clinical patients and reached nearly 30,000 underserved students and their families, along with school social workers, teachers with essential programming customized to meet the unique needs of each population/subgroup. Among the organization's signature support programs is a free shelter-to-clinic transportation service that removes a critical barrier to care—getting to the doctor; a new life-skills department that provides immediate needs such as food and clothing, but also linkages to entitlements and resources; and an in-clinic teaching kitchen that helps families living in shelters identify and prepare the best healthy food choices given their limited resources.

Ruling year info

1924

President and General Counsel

Mr. Sean T. Granahan Esq.

Executive vice president and chief medical officer

Ms. Shani Andre M.D.

Main address

Grand Central Station PO Box 3391

New York, NY 10163 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1624169

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Floating Hospital (TFH) is New York City's oldest pediatric charitable healthcare institution that has, since 1866, focused on the city's most vulnerable families. Today, it is the only FQHC in NYC with a dedicated focus on providing high-quality primary medical, dental and mental healthcare and related health education to families experiencing homelessness. It does so without regard to race, ethnicity, gender identity, immigration or insurance status, or ability to pay. With a suite of health services, free shelter-to-clinic patient shuttle that removes a significant barrier to care—getting to the doctor—TFH seeks to uplift families by giving them a trusted network of providers, related health educators and case managers, linkages to essential benefits and basic needs, and a medical home. When these services are in place and needs are met, vulnerable families have the hope and opportunity to improve their Social Determinants of Health and transcend their difficult circumstances.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Homeless Families

The Floating Hospital serves nearly 30,000 unique patient annually to families experiencing homelessness via the NYC shelter system, domestic-violence safe houses and those doubled up with others, in all five boroughs of New York City. TFH provides high-quality, comprehensive primary medical, dental and mental healthcare services, related health education, social support in its flagship clinic designed for modern and dignified healthcare. Among its key signature programs are a free shelter-to-clinic patient transport shuttle, an adolescent-health and youth development camp, a life-skills program, and an in-clinic teaching kitchen to help unhoused families learn best health practices for food/ingredient sourcing and preparation. All programs are patient-informed by the unique conditions and challenges of temporary housing.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

The Floating Hospital's Community Health Center provides community health and education services to residents of the Medically Underserved Area of Long Island City, with a particular focus on serving public housing developments, one of which is the largest such complex in North America with more than 3,100 units in 29 buildings.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Diversity & Inclusion Champion 2022

Crain's New York

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is based on the number of individuals who sought assistance with housing applications and resources in The Floating Hospital's newly launched life skills program. Not tracked in 2020.

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Unique MH patients based on the Floating Hospital's UDS and does not reflect waiting list of 200+ patients waiting for assessment screenings or total visits for repeat patients.

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This refers to clinic patients referred to the life skills dept. launched in 2022, and patients referred to in-clinic health-ed workshops; and homeless teens referred to TFH's summer youth camp.

Number of children having a medical home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Children aged less that one year to age 18, per annual UDS reporting from our homeless patient population and low-income community health care.

Number of adults with a source of ongoing care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Per annual UDS reporting, this represents all homeless population and low-income community health center adults after 19 and older receiving ongoing care at our flagship clinic.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Health Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Per annual UDS reporting from our homeless patient population and low-income community health care.

Number of parents receiving WIC benefits for their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

While the use of WIC specifically is not tracked, what is monitored is the number of homeless mothers with children who request assistance with food resources.

Number of individuals who are receiving timely health/dental exams

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Unique dental patients per annual UDS filing.

Number of individuals without a usual source of care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Per annual reporting on number of homeless and low-income patients served. Since our 2022 reporting we have served a influx of uninsured migrants that accounts for 31% of new patients.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

TFH's goal is not to provide healthcare in a vacuum, but as part of a wholistic suite of services that can help unhoused families do more than survive: We help them thrive. Our goal is to study, on an ongoing basis, the Social Determinants of Health that influence our patients' well-being and outcomes for success, and to provide the patient-informed care they need to obtain stable housing, employment, education and more. We first approach this with quality healthcare, related essential education, linkages to entitlements and assistance with their immediate basic needs such as food, clothing and personal/infant care items. Once patients are in our community, they can access youth development and leadership programming, healthy nutrition/food preparation workshops, financial literacy and job readiness assets, parenting and adolescent health programming.

We have been able to achieve this with the construction of a modern, comprehensive clinic in the Medically Underserved Area of Long Island City, where patient families and the larger underserved community can access compassionate, dignified healthcare. One of our goals has been to create a program for youth that begins with a focus on adolescent health and that leads to a curricula that includes socio-emotional learning, critical thinking and leadership development. The program, Camp Rise Up, has succeeded in "growing our own" as camp alumni become counselors and staff employees. TFH employs youth as the change agents for their entire families by showing them the possibilities of a future beyond a homeless shelter.

TFH has a long history of going to where its patients are and conducting listening tours for understanding their needs beyond just a shot in the arm. The entire organization relies on feedback from patient-informed care for developing the medical, social and supportive programs that serve its patients. Our primary strategy since 2021 has been employing Social Determinants of Health to understand those needs—from lack of access to benefits and case management to inadequate resources for basic needs.

TFH is staffed to provide clinical care in medical, dental and mental healthcare in a new clinic that, in 2021, increased patient capacity and programming. After its year-long SDoH survey and study conducted by its in-house project manager (PhD in organizational behavior and project design), TFH created a life-skills department that works under the auspices of its health education department (directed by a doctorate-level public health specialist). These programs, in turn, work in tandem with other off-shoots of health ed and patient care: the youth development camp and parenting programs and food and nutrition workshops in TFH's in-clinic teaching kitchen, among them.

TFH has successfully constructed and moved into a $8.3M modern clinic that has increased capacity and programming. This year it will add an optometry suite to its specialties. The 2021 launch of the life-skills department expanded TFH’s SDoH work and reach into the patient community and informed a new level of service that meets patients’ immediate needs, including a new influx of unhoused migrant families. TFH plans to seek funding to continue the SDoH study to determine post-pandemic needs and expand on the services. In six years, Camp Rise Up has grown from 25 youth campers to 80. It launched a counselor-in-training program, which has led to two camper alumni having staff jobs at TFH. TFH expects to continue expanding this youth program, which does not receive any government assistance and relies 100-percent on private funding, to 100 campers this year. TFH plans to expand into more services for women/families experiencing domestic violence.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

The Floating Hospital, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Floating Hospital, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dominick DeLorenzo

UBS Financial Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/1/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/30/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.