COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

aka CFR   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.cfr.org

Mission

The Council on Foreign Relations, founded in 1921, is a national membership organization and think tank with headquarters in New York, offices in Washington, DC, and programs that extend across the country. Its widely respected and influential research staff - - with backgrounds in government and scholarship in most international subjects - - regularly meets with Council members and other leaders and thinkers. These exclusive sessions, known as study groups or roundtables, form the Council s intellectual core. The aim is to provide insights into international affairs and to develop new ideas for US foreign policy, particularly national security and foreign economic policy. Council Fellows produce books, articles, manuscripts, and op-ed pieces and regularly contribute expert commentary on television and radio. The Council also publishes FOREIGN AFFAIRS, the leading periodical in the field. This magazine has been host to the most important articles about world affairs in this century.

Ruling year info

1927

President, Executive Office

Dr. Richard N. Haass

Main address

58 E 68th St

New York, NY 10065 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1628168

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (Q05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission is to be a resource and a source of ideas, and to provide analysis and background to help people understand the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

The Council s 3,400 members are divided almost equally among New York, Washington, DC, and the rest of the nation. They include nearly all current and former senior US government officials who deal with international matters; renowned scholars; and leaders of business, media, human rights, humanitarian, and other nongovernmental groups. Council members choose new members, who aim to educate themselves and then others. The Council is host to the widest possible range of views and advocate of none. It cultivates an atmosphere of nonpartisanship and nonideological engagement among members and staff. The views expressed in Council-sponsored independent task force reports, by members of study groups, or in articles in Foreign Affairs are solely the responsibility of the respective authors or groups. This tradition of impartiality enables the Council to gather contending voices for serious and civil debate and discussion. That special convening power is unique in American society.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher dedicated to being a resource for its members, government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. Founded in 1921, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Our goal is to start a conversation in this country about the need for Americans to better understand the world.

We decided the Council would be a resource not only for its members, but also for nonmembers and non-elites who traditionally have been only peripherally involved in foreign policy discussions. These include religious leaders, state and local officials, students and teachers from a wide range of fields at the high school and college levels, journalists from smaller outlets, and everyday citizens who just want to stay informed. The Council’s mission was revised to reflect this change, to be an independent, nonpartisan resource to help people everywhere better understand the world and the foreign policy choices the United States faces.

The Council is at its core a membership organization. We now have more than five thousand members of increasing professional, gender, racial, and ethnic diversity. A plurality of our members now resides outside New York and Washington, DC. Our Term Member Program has brought more young people into our ranks, ensuring that the next generation of foreign policy leaders is better prepared. The Council also has about 150 corporate members that add a valuable private-sector perspective to foreign policy discussions.

We will continue to serve our usual audience (and do even more in our traditional areas), and we will ramp up our broader outreach efforts. As a hybrid institution—a membership organization, a venue for meetings, a think tank, a publisher, and an educational organization and public resource—the Council is well positioned to serve multiple constituencies. The Council is at its core a membership organization. We now have more than five thousand members of increasing professional, gender, racial, and ethnic diversity. A plurality of our members now resides outside New York and Washington, DC. Our Term Member Program has brought more young people into our ranks, ensuring that the next generation of foreign policy leaders is better prepared. The Council also has about 150 corporate members that add a valuable private-sector perspective to foreign policy discussions.

Financials

COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

Board of directors
as of 04/19/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David M. Rubenstein

Co-founder & Co-Executive Chairman of The Carlyle Group

Blair Effron

Centerview Partners

Jami Miscik

Kissinger Associates

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes