CARE HQ

aka Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, Inc.   |   Atlanta, GA   |  https://www.care.org/

Mission

CARE works around the globe to save lives, defeat poverty, and achieve social justice. We seek a world of hope, inclusion, and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and all people live with dignity and security. We put women and girls in the center because we know that we cannot overcome poverty until all people have equal rights and opportunities.

Ruling year info

1993

President and Chief Executive Officer

Michelle Nunn

Main address

151 Ellis Street NE

Atlanta, GA 30303 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1685039

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

International Economic Development (Q32)

International Agricultural Development (Q31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CARE and partners aim to measurably improve the lives of 200 million people in poverty by 2030. We understand that the root causes of poverty are complex in nature and interlinked. Sustainable change requires more than a single-issue solution; to address the root causes of poverty, we must tackle issues from multiple angles and remove the systemic barriers that keep people poor. CARE integrates approaches to fight poverty across six impact areas (Crisis, Food & Water, Health, Education & Work, Climate, and Equality), working with local partners and bridge-building with governments, the private sector, and global institutions for impact. Keeping in mind the current landscape and challenges ahead, the CARE USA network will focus on three impact drivers for the next four years: gender equal, locally led, and globally scaled. These impact drivers are at the heart of what will accelerate our work and transformation, setting us on a path to achieve our ambitious impact goals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Crisis Response

Whether it is a sudden emergency or an ongoing crisis, CARE works to aid people in need around the world.

In 2022, 274 million people will need humanitarian assistance and protection. This number is a significant increase from 235 million people a year ago, which was already the highest figure in decades.

On average, humanitarian crises are more complex and protracted than at any time in the last 15 years, and last nearly three years longer than they used to. Conflict, migration, and climate change are the key trends driving these crises—with eight of the worst food crises in the world linked to conflict and climate change.

In emergency situations, CARE focuses on access to health, particularly for women and girls, women’s leadership, hunger, psychosocial support, and cash assistance. In 2021, CARE reached 24 million people in humanitarian crisis to help meet their basic needs.

Learn more: https://www.care.org/our-work/disaster-response

Population(s) Served
Refugees and displaced people
Internally displaced people
Victims of conflict and war
Victims of disaster

Hunger and malnutrition remain major threats to global public health. 820 million people will go to bed hungry tonight, and 2 billion more don’t know where their next meal is coming from.

These numbers are unacceptable, but they’re also getting worse. Over the last three years, conflict and climate change have caused food insecurity to increase every year. Farmers struggle to grow the food they need for themselves, and to sell at markets. And the number of people in the world affected by hunger increased in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Water and markets are a critical part of this work. CARE links water to other activities so that we can make the biggest impact possible, and promotes changes that generate sustained impact and equality in multiple ways.

In 2021, CARE helped 34 million people gain access to food, water, and nutrition.

Learn more: https://www.care.org/our-work/food-and-nutrition

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of disaster
Women and girls
Men and boys
Farmers

In poor countries, four out of 1,000 women will die in childbirth. In Sub-Saharan Africa, one in 13 children will die before their 15th birthday—16 times more than children in countries like the U.S. The problems are about more than wealth, access, and infrastructure. Gender inequality, child marriage, and gender-based violence all contribute. So do emergencies, with women and children making up 76% of people displaced in times of crisis.

CARE works to remove barriers that prevent the most vulnerable people from accessing quality, equitable health care, while increasing health systems’ ability to serve those hardest to reach. CARE also works to provide high-quality health information and services to youth, building the knowledge and skills they need to transition into healthy, productive adulthood.

In 2021, CARE helped 48 million people gain access to health services, including the right to sexual and reproductive health.

Learn more: https://www.care.org/our-work/health

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls
Men and boys

Education and the right to work are the most powerful tools in overcoming extreme poverty. CARE works to increase access to quality education for marginalized children, particularly adolescent girls. Our tailored curricula build relevant skills and opportunities for positive transitions to further education and employment.

CARE’s microfinance program, the Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs), have provided the template for successful community savings and enterprise. They also became a lifeline for thousands of communities facing COVID-19, through education and modified business models that kept community members safe.

Dignified work is a critical component of CARE’s approach to education and work: from domestic workers to those employed in the garment industry, CARE ensures women have dignified work opportunities.

In 2021, CARE enabled 14 million people to support women’s economic justice.

Learn more: https://www.care.org/our-work/education-and-work

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

CARE believes that everyone has the right to live on a healthy planet. It is estimated that climate change may push an additional 132 million people into poverty by 2030. Strengthening the resilience of the poorest and most marginalized people, especially women and girls, while building their capacities to adapt, becomes more pressing every day. At the same time, countries most responsible for climate change must commit to a stronger, zero-carbon future.

This transition will define our path to climate justice through increased capacities and assets for people of all genders, policies and actions by powerholders in the global north and the global south, and strengthened civil society, including social movements.

In 2021, CARE helped 3 million people to support climate justice and address the effects of climate change.

Learn more: https://www.care.org/our-work/climate

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Gender remains one of the most fundamental sources of inequality in the world today. Across nearly every country, women earn only a fraction of what men do, and trans/non-binary people are disproportionately impacted by poverty and denial of fundamental rights.

CARE’s work is inextricably connected with race, class, ability, sexual orientation and gender identity, and other identities. CARE and its partners must learn from and support women and girls to challenge injustice and work toward equality. CARE does this through partnerships with social justice movements and supporting solidarity groups among women and girls. CARE tackles harmful gender and social norms, working to prevent and respond to gender-based violence (GBV), engaging men and boys, and taking steps to hold itself accountable to its commitments.

In 2021, CARE helped 3 million people advance gender equality.

Learn more: ttps://www.care.org/our-work/gender-equality

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

Where we work

Accreditations

BBB Wise Giving Alliance 2020

Charity Navigator 4-Star Charity 2021

CharityWatch Top-Rated Charity 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people in humanitarian crisis supported through CARE

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people supported through access to health information and services, including sexual and reproductive health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people supported through access to food, water, and nutrition

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prior to FY21, food security and resilience to climate change were tracked as a single metric. Those combined metrics can be viewed in CARE's annual reports.

Number of women supported through economic justice programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people supported through climate justice programs and addressing the effects of climate change

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prior to FY21, resilience to climate change and food security were tracked as a single metric. Those combined metrics can be viewed in CARE's annual reports.

Number of people supported through programs that advance gender equality

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prior to FY21, gender equality metrics focused on the prevention of gender-based violence. Those metrics can be viewed in CARE's annual reports.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

CARE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CARE

Board of directors
as of 3/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Glenn Hutchins

North Island, Silverlake

Runa Alam

Development Partners International

Dolika Banda

International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group and CDC Group Plc, UK

Martha Brooks

Novelis, Inc.

Charlie Dent

Former Congressman and Policy Advisor

Michele Flournoy

WestExec Advisors

Jay Hallik

Morgan Stanley

Everett Harper

Truss, The Infrastructuralists

Susan Hassan

Sea Dune Partners

Seema Jayachandran

Northwestern University

Radhika Jones

Vanity Fair

Stephen Joyce

Dine Brands Global

Mohamed Kande

PwC

Tessa Lyons-Laing

Instagram

H. Conrad Meyer III

Private Investor

Valerie Montgomery Rice

Morehouse School of Medicine

Jane Mosbacher Morris

To The Market

William Mosakowski

Public Consulting Group Inc.

Michelle Nunn

CARE USA

Christopher O'Leary

General Mills, Inc.

Una Osili

IUPI

Kathryn Petralia

Kabbage Inc.

Horacio Rozanski

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

English Sall

Sall Family Foundation

Richard Stengel

Snapchat

Virginia Sall

Sall Family Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/09/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/09/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.