American Cancer Society, Inc.

Attacking cancer from every angle.

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.cancer.org

Mission

The American Cancer Society's mission is to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer.

Ruling year info

1942

Chief Executive Officer

Gary Reedy

Main address

250 Williams Street NW

Atlanta, GA 30303 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1788491

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Cancer (G30)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Attacking cancer from every angle.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research

Research - support provided to academic institutions and scientists to seek new knowledge about the causes, prevention, and cure of cancer, and to conduct epidemiological and behavioral studies.

Population(s) Served

Prevention - programs that provide the public and health professionals with information and education to prevent cancer occurrence or to reduce risk of developing cancer.

Population(s) Served

Detection/treatment - programs that are directed at finding cancer before it is clinically apparent and that provide information and education about cancer treatments for cure, recurrence, symptom management and pain control.

Population(s) Served

Patient support - programs to assist cancer patients and their families and ease the burden of cancer for them.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of death caused by cancer

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

*estimated deaths

Increase interventions to reduce colorectal cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest colorectal cancer death rates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total % Population Colorectal Cancer Screening Rate

Increase interventions to prevent HPV-related cancers and pre-cancers around the world.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

National General population HPV vaccination rate

Provide multi-channel resource navigation options

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Patient Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# Constituents Served with Patient Related Information by NCIC

Improve access to care for those most likely to experience inadequate access to cancer treatment & support services by focus on patient navigation solutions and service programs that address barriers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Patient Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# nights provided by Hope Lodge

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The American Cancer Society, Inc. Board of Directors established Outcome Goals for six Mission Priority areas:

Lung Cancer/Tobacco Control
• Increase tobacco excise taxes in all jurisdictions and increase the federal excise tax.
• Increase the percentage of the population covered by comprehensive smoke-free laws,
with the ultimate goal of a comprehensive, non-preemptive federal smoke-free law.
• Achieve Medicare coverage for evidence-based lung cancer screening and serve as the convener of relevant groups to promote adherence to high-quality screening guidelines.

Healthy Eating Active Living Environment
• Promote environmental change that will improve nutrition and physical activity and advocate for related legislative and regulatory policy at all levels of government.

Colorectal Cancer
Increase interventions to reduce colorectal cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest colorectal cancer death rates.

Breast Cancer
• Increase interventions to reduce breast cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest breast cancer death rates.

Cancer Treatment & Patient Care
• Provide multi-channel resource navigation options.
• Implement interventions aimed at reducing barriers to care for individuals with lower income and lower education levels.

Access to Care
(This outcome cuts across all areas.)
• Implement key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) related to access to preventive services, insurance market reforms, operation of state and federal exchanges including access to viable provider networks and adequate drug
formularies, enhanced transparency, development of an adequate essential benefits package, expansion of Medicaid, and improved Medicare coverage.
• Improve access to care for cancer patients and their families who are most likely to experience inadequate access to high-quality cancer treatment and support services by focusing on patient navigation solutions and service programs that address barriers.

NOTE: the enterprise conducts a significant amount of work in areas other than the priority areas that is not discussed here.

The organization utilizes a variety of strategies to achieve the Outcome Goals including public policy advocacy, systems policy and practice, information and empowerment, research and resource navigation.

The organization has capabilties to achieve the Outcome Goals including our 501c4 sister organization, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network as well as expertise in cancer control, corporate systems, health systems, community engagement. Additionally, we deliver comprehensive patient information and service programs and operate both extramural and intramural research programs.

Although there are many kinds of cancer, they all start with out-of-control replication, cell death, and loss of normal cell function. Cancer tops the list of Americans' health concerns because it is still a prevalent – and too often deadly – disease.

The Society educates the public, the media, and health professionals about the steps people can take to stay
well, programs and resources the Society offers to help people with cancer get well, the progress toward and
action needed to find cancer's causes and cures, and ways everyone can fight back against the disease. The
Society works to maintain its leadership roles in research, education, advocacy, and patient support programs. Since 1946, the Society has invested more than $4.3 billion in cancer research.

Also, because cancer knows no boundaries, our mission includes establishing key focus areas to help reduce the global burden of cancer. These include global grassroots policy and awareness, tobacco control, cancer screening and vaccination for breast and cervical cancers, access to pain relief, and the support of cancer registration in low- and middle-income countries.

Evidence now shows that early detection can halt common cancers such as those of the cervix, breast, and colon, which represented a quarter of new cancer cases in 2014. We now have strategies that can help prevent many cancers from starting at all. The development of treatments such as Gleevec and Herceptin has shown how specific molecules can target and block cancer-causing abnormalities.

Mortality rates have declined for almost all major cancers for both men and women, and in 2014 we marked an overall 22 percent decline in these rates since the early 1990s.

Thanks to these advances, cancer survivorship has now become part of our public discourse. Nearly 14 million Americans who have a personal history of cancer are alive today – twice the number of survivors as 30 years ago. We expect this number to go from 14 million to 18 million by 2022.

Cancer claims the lives of more than 1,600 people every day in the United States, and worldwide is a growing threat that is projected to nearly double by 2030, causing 21.4 million cases and killing 13.2 million people, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Our organizational mission to eliminate cancer as a major health problem is at increasing risk and challenged by these global trends. Achieving our goal and combating this rising worldwide threat will require us to be more effective than ever before – we will need to quantify the lifesaving impact we have on chronic disease and act as a true leader, bringing others together across sectors to collectively turn the tide.

Financials

American Cancer Society, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/21/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kevin Cullen

Arnold Baskies

Daniel Heist

Kevin Cullen

Scarlott Mueller

Jeffrey Kean

John Alfonso

Patricia Crome

Jorge Luis Lopez

Carmen Guerra

Brian Marlow

Gregory Pemberton

Gareth Joyce

Amit Kumar

Joseph Naylor

William Novelli

Gary Shedlin

Edward Benz

Bruce Barron

Michael Marquardt

Joseph Agresta, Jr.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes