Amref Health Africa, Inc.

New York, NY   |  http://www.amrefusa.org

Mission

Amref Health Africa's mission is to improve the health of people in Africa by partnering with and empowering communities, and strengthening health systems. Our vision is lasting health change. Amref Health Africa delivers health services and health worker training to over 30 countries in Africa including Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda.

Notes from the nonprofit

Amref Health Africa has successfully stopped the outbreak of diseases such as Ebola and cholera. To stop the spread of COVID-19 in Africa, Amref is working closely with African Ministries of Health, the African Centres of Disease Control, and the World Health Organization to train frontline health workers with training on COVID-19, scale up testing, and expand community awareness on preventing the spread of the disease. In Kenya for example, we are improving disease surveillance, early symptom detection and tracking the spread of the disease, which Amref already does in several African countries including Tanzania. Please see https://amrefusa.org/featured/coronavirus/ for more specific information on COVID-19

Ruling year info

1961

Executive Director

Mr. Robert Kelty

Main address

75 Broad Street Suite 703

New York, NY 10004 USA

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Formerly known as

AMREF

EIN

13-1867411

NTEE code info

Community Health Systems (E21)

Public Health Program (E70)

AIDS (G81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Koota Injena

Through our activity called Koota Injena (“Come let us talk” in the Borana language), which is funded by USAID, we are engaging communities in Samburu and Marsabit Counties in Kenya through intergenerational dialogues to collectively abandon FGM (Female Genital Mutilation) and CEFM (Child, early or forced marriage). We train “champions” in the community to hold open discussions and help their peers, family and friends re-envision how girls are treated, why their rights should be respected and why they should finish their education. One of the innovative approaches of Koota Injena is engaging with clan elders, who make decisions for the rest of the community. This approach is working. In just one year, we reached 99 high level clan elders, all of whom have changed their hearts and minds about FGM and child marriage.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Through support from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and our donors, Amref Health Africa is strengthening the national laboratory system of South Sudan to provide accurate and timely diagnoses and to be able to provide HIV prevention and treatment services to control the epidemic in South Sudan.

To do this, Amref Health Africa is strengthening the lab systems of South Sudan by training both new and existing lab workers to provide higher quality services that support HIV care and treatment. In collaboration with South Sudan’s Ministry of Health, we are reviewing and updating in-service training programs so lab workers can upgrade their skills on the job.

Through this program, we ensure that labs have the equipment and supplies needed to offer high quality testing services that support disease diagnosis, care and treatment. We also ensure that labs can provide Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) for newborns that may have had an infectious disease transmitted through their mothers, as well as provide a safe blood supply through the National Blood Transfusion Service. This program also aims to strengthen the Public Health Laboratory in the capital of Juba so that samples collected throughout the country can be collected, re-tested for quality assurance, and inventoried. This would strengthen the overall national lab network. In the past, samples were often sent to labs in Nairobi, Kenya.

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS

Amref Health Africa is currently partnering with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to prevent disease outbreaks at the community level in Tanzania. The project is part of the CDC’s Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), a push to strengthen systems that closely monitor diseases in communities. Its aim is to improve disease data collection, analysis, and communication between communities and health facilities which makes it easier to treat and prevent outbreaks.

Amref partners with the CDC to help identify challenges that prevent communities from detecting potential disease threats in the Arusha, Kilimanjaro, Kagera, Kigoma, Katavi and Mbeya regions in Tanzania.

Through the project, we trained 669 Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) and 132 health workers Community Based Surveillance (CBS) system. This system exposes the presence of diseases early, improves warning systems so that people are more aware, and ensures the reliable communication of this information from communities to local health facilities all the way up to national-level hospitals.

CHVs are trained to make household visits in their community and identify early symptoms of diseases. At these household visits, CHVs are trained to provide health education on how to prevent disease as well as to identify any troubling symptoms. They are also trained to provide referrals to nearby clinics and health facilities for treatment, and to report the disease cases to trained health workers like nurses.

Health workers like nurses are trained to identify diseases, provide improved treatment to patients, and to record and report cases of diseases that will be collected at both local-level and national-level databases.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In partnership with Comic Relief, Amref Health Africa is providing immunization across fifteen districts in the Afar region of Ethiopia, prioritizing the Berhale, Elidear, Dubti and Teru districts where there is a high proportion of children and pregnant women who do not complete vaccinations.

Many of the people who live in Afar’s hard-to-reach districts are women, young children and infants who live too far from a health facility where they can receive routine immunizations. This makes them more susceptible to preventable diseases such as polio and measles. Several of the communities that are in these districts are pastoral, which means they migrate throughout the year with their livestock. This keeps them even farther from health facilities where they can access necessary health services like immunization.

Through this project, we provide immunizations for young children, infants and pregnant women at health facilities in these districts and through mobile immunization teams – teams of health workers, well-stocked with immunizations that meet the pastoral communities on their migration routes. Additionally, the project works to reach community, clan and religious leaders who wield influence in their communities, so that they can promote immunization and other child health services.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Caregivers

Amref Health Africa has successfully stopped the outbreak of diseases such as Ebola and cholera. To stop the spread of COVID-19 in Africa, Amref is working closely with African Ministries of Health, the African Centres of Disease Control, and the World Health Organization to train frontline health workers with training on COVID-19, scale up testing, and expand community awareness on preventing the spread of the disease. In Kenya for example, we are improving disease surveillance, early symptom detection and tracking the spread of the disease, which Amref already does in several African countries including Tanzania.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity 2020

Affiliations & memberships

Bill and Melinda Gates Award for Public Health 2005

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Community Health Workers Trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community Health Workers were trained in community disease surveillance to prevent deadly disease outbreaks, such as Ebola.

Number of people reached with Health Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This represents the number of beneficiaries reached directly through RMNCH, WASH, clinical and diagnostic services, and treatment for infectious and Non-Communicable Diseases

Number of youth trained in Advocacy for SRHR in Kenya

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide training to help youth advocate for policies that advance gender equality and increase access to sexual and reproductive health services.

Number of women and children receiving Reproductive, Maternal and Child Health Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people with improved water access

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of beneficiaries reached directly through improved Water and sanitation Access.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Overall, Amref Health Africa's aim is to achieve lasting health change in Africa. To do this, we work to improve people's health in a sustainable manner by finding solutions to African health challenges with African expertise. More specifically, we aim to reach the most marginalized and remote areas of Africa to eradicate poverty and improve health. One of our priorities in achieving lasting health change is reducing the maternal mortality rates because women are at the heart of the community – if a woman is healthy, her family, the community and the economy benefits from her contributions. Other goals include: decreasing incidence of infectious disease – HIV, malaria, TB; improving overall health of communities with clean water and sanitation (leads to disease prevention and better health); and delivering medical and surgical outreach to communities that otherwise could not benefit from specialized surgical services.

Our unique approach focuses on strengthening health systems at the community level, so that even people living in Africa's most marginalized and remote communities can access vital health services, and training local health workers at every level of the health system from doctors and Ministry of Health administrators to nurses and midwives. We also involve the community in every step of the program development process - from planning to implementation. We equip local communities with the knowledge, skills and tools to transform their own health.

Our staff is 97% African, most of which work in the communities in which they live, which gives them a profound depth of understanding about how to partner with communities to create behavior change and better health. Furthermore, we have been working with African communities for 58 years and understand the cultural contexts within which to operate, empower and improve conditions. We are very closely aligned with the Ministries of Health in all the countries in which we work, implementing programs that reflect national health strategies, which ensures efficient implementation and sustainability. We are experts in our field - we operate a national training center in Nairobi, Kenya where we train all health worker cadres from over 35 countries. Additionally, we have pioneered the use of several newer technologies such as eLearning and mLearning to train health workers. One accomplishment we are particularly proud of is the development of the first open source mobile platform for training community health workers on simple mobile phones to enable greater scale up in training the critical frontline health workers who, with basic training, are capable of preventing common and potentially fatal diseases. Additionally, we have six African offices and two hubs in South and West Africa deeply familiar with the communities and contexts in which they operate. And finally, we partner with private sector and key academic institutions to ensure we have the resources and technical expertise to implement our programs.

As an organization, Amref Health Africa is equipped to make a large, sustainable impact in the lives of people across sub-Saharan Africa- we reach millions of people every year. In 2015 we reached nearly 9,000,000 people through our health programs and trained over 115,000 local health workers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve over seven million people annually across the African continent.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In one of our youth advocacy programs, we recently shifted our priorities based on feedback from people on the ground.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have always done this - it is part of our ethos. Feedback from our program recipients always drives the next program, and the program after that, etc

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Amref Health Africa, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Amref Health Africa, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Wolk

Timothy S. Wilson

William H. MacArthur

Robert Kelty

Amref Health Africa

Carol Jenkins

Hensley Evans

Nyagaka Ongeri

Joseph E. Pegues Jr.

Sarah Elizabeth Rees

Robert Wolk

Michael Cushing

Roshan Rahnama

Defina Maluki Maluki

Aaron Reitkopf

Marisa Mueller

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.