PLATINUM2024

CHURCH OF THE HOLY APOSTLES

aka Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen   |   New York, NY   |  holyapostlesnyc.org

Mission

The mission of Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, a non-sectarian program of the Church of the Holy Apostles, is to feed the hungry, comfort the afflicted, seek justice for people experiencing homelessness, and provide hope and opportunity to those in need. In addition to multiple meal outreach programs, we offer a social services center, writers workshop, health services, exercise classes, discussion groups, computer classes, and more.

Ruling year info

1972

Principal Officer

Rev. Dr. Anna Pearson

Main address

296 Ninth Ave

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-2892297

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (K01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen

HASK is NYC's largest emergency food program. For over 30 years, we have provided a hot, nutritious lunch every weekday to anyone who needs it. Unlike other food programs, we do not have a prequalification process and everyone is welcome.

We are also a community for people who have no community, and offer a social services center, writers' workshops, exercise classes, and discussion groups. We also partner with other organizations that provide health and benefits services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The focus of our food program continues to be on serving nutritious meals that includes fresh fruits and vegetables, lean beef, poultry, whole wheat grains, poultry and dairy sourced within NYS. We take pride in partnering with farms, co-ops and food markets throughout the area. We also offer a wide range of additional services, such as writers' workshops, exercise and meditation classes, and discussion groups.

Additionally, we have also started computer classes to instruct those who are not familiar with the basics. Topics include how to open and manage a free email account, basic keyboard and mouse skills, search tools, printing and saving documents, how to access free online applications such as spreadsheet and word processing tools, protecting your identity and avoiding harmful and dangerous software such as malware and viruses. The classes meet twice a week for six week intervals, and because each class has only six to eight students, they get individualized attention from the teachers. These classes are especially vital for older adults who did not learn about computers in school.

The Soup Kitchen partners with Project Renewal, which sends its MedVan three times a week, Long Island University medical students, who provide health-related workshops, and many organizations that provide information tables at the Soup Kitchen, for example Samaritan Village.

Many think the focus of our food program is on quantity of meals served but actually, the most important thing for us is meal quality. Some of our chefs are graduates of the Doe Fund's culinary program and many have at one time experienced homelessness and hunger themselves. They know what it is like to only have one meal in a day and how it needs to last. We plan meals months in advance that are nutritionally balanced, in season and, of course, appetizing. To achieve our goals we work with many partners – local farms, co-ops, food markets as well as City Harvest, Tabatchnick soup (who provide us with 500 gallons of soup each week) and other food donors. Despite all this goodwill and generosity however, the sheer numbers of soup kitchen guests means we have to purchase more than half of the food we serve every day.

The strength of our Social Services Center lies in pinpointing what people need and finding the appropriate services for them. Every day, we offer our guests (our nomenclature for clients) the following free services: referrals to shelters, substance abuse treatment facilities, and clothing pantries, career preparation, resume writing support, donated toiletries and coats, vouchers for haircuts and optical care and photo IDs. In 2013, we had 34,137 sessions; in 2014, we had 45,828 sessions, and on average, we help over 100 people every weekday.

We have 21 staff members, many of whom are part-time. Our Executive Director has over 30 years of experience working with social services, and our Chief Operating Officer, who oversees the kitchen, was trained at the Culinary Institute of America.

Quite simply, we would not be able to offer all of these services without the help of 55-60 volunteers who help each weekday. They perform a variety of tasks, including preparing and serving the food, serving beverages and cleaning up. Some volunteers are trained to work as volunteer coordinators or social services specialists. We are also fortunate to have musicians volunteer their time and perform for our guests during lunch, as profiled on the front page of the NYT last December.

School and youth groups also frequently volunteer at the Soup Kitchen. Mary Russo, a former youth volunteer, wrote about the Soup Kitchen for the Cavalier Daily, “The most striking aspect of this experience was the physical diversity of the people in need. Food programs are essential to ensuring the nutritional stability and general survival of those facing such dire circumstances."

We were set up in 1982 as a temporary program to tackle what was perceived as a temporary problem of hunger and homelessness. Clearly, we know now that this problem was far from temporary and that numbers of both in our city are at a peak today.

While we have not accomplished the goal of eliminating hunger and homelessness, we have accomplished many others: providing hot nutritious meals for anyone in need who comes to us; serving every weekday over 33 years through blizzards, hurricanes, a terrorist attack and even the day after a fire destroyed the church; expanding our programs to include social services, referrals, computer training, writing workshops, yoga and meditation; and building a community where volunteers and guests are treated with dignity and respect.

Our aim is to continue to expand to meet the needs of our guests where they are, on their terms, and when they need us. We remain hopeful that over time, this need will lessen and perhaps one day, as our founders hoped, we won't be needed at all.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

CHURCH OF THE HOLY APOSTLES
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHURCH OF THE HOLY APOSTLES

Board of directors
as of 05/02/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mark Larrimore

The New School

Term: 2023 - 2026


Board co-chair

Donna Lamb

Retired

Term: 2024 - 2025

Donna Lamb

Retired

Mark Larrimore

The New School

John Sandercock

Attorney

Sherwin Nicholson

Population Council Fund

Rick Milton

Licensed Massage Therapist

Steve Turtell

Writer

Barbara DiPietro

Retired

Jim Connolly

Financial Marketing Analyst

Matthew Reeg

Teacher

C. Edward Case

Retired

Cynthia Rock

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/5/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data