National Center for Learning Disabilities, Inc.

aka NCLD   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.ncld.org/

Mission

The mission of NCLD is to improve the lives of the 1 in 5 children and adults nationwide with learning and attention issues—by empowering parents and young adults, transforming schools and advocating for equal rights and opportunities. We're working to create a society in which every individual possesses the academic, social and emotional skills needed to succeed in school, at work and in life.

Ruling year info

1977

CEO

Ms. Lindsay Jones

Chief Operating officer

Dr. Kena Mayberry

Main address

1220 L Street, NW. Ste. 100 Box 168

Washington, DC 20005 USA

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EIN

13-2899381

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of NCLD is to improve the lives of the 1 in 5 children and adults nationwide with learning and attention issues—by empowering parents and young adults, transforming schools and advocating for equal rights and opportunities. We're working to create a society in which every individual possesses the academic, social and emotional skills needed to succeed in school, at work and in life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Public Policy & Advocacy

Students with learning disabilities drop out of high school at nearly three times the rate of their peers. Only 24% of college undergraduates disclose their learning and attention issues to access support. And despite being as capable as their peers, adults with learning disabilities are twice as likely to be jobless. For decades, NCLD has fought to make this nation a better place for people with learning and attention issues by improving federal legislation that affects them. We’ve recently extended our reach to state legislation and to working directly with parents and local communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with learning disabilities

Many individuals with learning and attention issues struggle when they leave the supports of high school behind. In fact, working-age adults with learning disabilities are employed at nearly half the rate of their peers. Our Student Voices research tells us, however, that young adults can and do thrive when they have constructive support at home, self-confidence and have a strong connection to friends and family. NCLD is exploring initiatives that can encourage these and other positive conditions that facilitate a successful transition to adulthood. This includes developing young adult leadership who can advocate for themselves and for their peers.

Population(s) Served
People with learning disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2016

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2020

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NCLD believes that better academic, social and emotional outcomes for individuals with learning and attention issues are directly linked to decisions and actions taken by parents, educators, school leaders, policy makers and the young adults themselves.

NCLD will improve the lives of people with learning and attention issues by:

1) empowering parents to support and advocate for their own and other children
2) supporting young adults in their self-advocacy
3) transforming schools through implementation of proven best practices
4) strengthening policy through advocacy at the federal, state and local levels.

We employ various strategies to achieve our goals and they are customized to best meet the needs of our audiences:

Our parent empowerment work is based on 1) building and engaging a large national network of parents, 2) conducting campaigns to support and motivate parents to take action for their own and other children, 3) and working with parents at grassroots level in selected states to become effective agents for change.

Our school transformation strategies focus on state, district and school-level education leaders. We 1) create and deliver professional development services and resources related to states' college-and-career-ready standards, 2) develop and deliver decision-making tools so that school leaders can implement proven best practices, 3) and lead knowledge-building events to promote adoption and implementation of best practices

We advocate for stronger, more equitable public policy through 1) educating policymakers, agencies, White House and others on education, transition, training, employment and other critical issues for students with learning difficulties and disabilities, 2 ) leading knowledge-building initiatives to drive the policy debate, to build consensus around best practices, and to improve legislation, 3) creating campaigns and conducting Annual Advocacy Days to mobilize parents and advocates, and 4) targeting selected states and districts that are important in the national education discussions and debates.

We are currently enhancing our program to support young adults in their self-advocacy by 1) establishing a knowledge base about the unique strengths, challenges, and preferences of young adults (16-25) with learning and attention issues, and 2)by developing strategies and activities/resources that will help young adults to be confident and effective self-advocates

Both our long history of expertise in learning and attention issues and our unique role as a national nonprofit organization make us uniquely capable of responding quickly and efficiently to the challenges of the rapidly changing political and educational environment. Our strategies are built on nearly 40 years of working with parents, raising public awareness and protecting the rights of individuals with learning and attention issues. Our dedicated Board of Directors consists of parents of children with learning and attention issues and we have a dedicated, knowledgeable staff of more than 25 team members, with expertise in learning and attention issues, online communications and engagement, school reform, public policy and advocacy, and partnership and community building. An invitation-only Professional Advisory Board comprised of leading experts in LD-specific disorders (reading, math, written expression, executive functioning/information processing), disorders of attention and behavior (e.g., ADHD), school reform, speech/language disorders, assistive technologies and universal design for learning, post-secondary transition and the workplace, teacher preparation, school administration and leadership, public policy and advocacy, parent advocacy and support and medicine (pediatrics, neurology, psychiatry) supports our strategic and program planning.

We are currently in the process of finalizing a new strategic plan to strengthen and maximize our impact and support more of the 60 million individuals nationwide with learning and attention issues.

Financials

National Center for Learning Disabilities, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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National Center for Learning Disabilities, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 1/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Margi Booth


Board co-chair

Joe Zimmel

Mary Kalikow

John R. Langeler

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Mark Griffin, Ph.D.

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The Honorable Thomas H. Kean

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Mark A. Michael

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Margi Booth

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Jody Bellows

Kenneth Plevan

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Cassia Schifter

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Kristine Baxter

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Sally Quinn

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Janet Steinmayer

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Joe Zimmel

David Chard

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Shanti Fry

Jenna Ellis

John Gantz

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data