NORTHERN MANHATTAN IMPROVEMENT CORP

aka NMIC   |   New York, NY   |  www.nmic.org

Mission

NMIC is a community-based nonprofit organization founded in 1979 that all New York City residents with a focus on those in Northern Manhattan and the South and West Bronx. Our mission is to serve as a catalyst for positive change in the lives of the people in our community on their paths to secure, violence-free, and prosperous futures.   We preserve affordable housing through legal services, community organizing, and building weatherization; we promote economic self-sufficiency through adult education and workforce development; and we stabilize families through social services, health education, and domestic violence intervention. All NMIC services are free and bilingual in English and Spanish.

Ruling year info

1980

Executive Director

Ms. Maria Lizardo

Main address

45 Wadsworth Avenue

New York, NY 10033 USA

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EIN

13-2972415

NTEE code info

Neighborhood Center, Settlement House (P28)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our core catchment area is Upper Manhattan and adjacent Bronx neighborhoods. Today, we serve over 14,000 people annually—who are nearly 100% low income, 78% are foreign born, and 64% speak Spanish as their primary language. As low-income immigrants, our clients are faced with many unfair barriers to success. Our community members have experienced economic exclusion for decades and our programs address this by increasing opportunities for success. We step in to make sure our clients' emergency needs such as hunger, eviction, and loss of income are immediately resolved. In 2019, over one-quarter of residents in the community we serve reported an income below the federal poverty line, and thirty-five percent of households in Washington Heights and Inwood receive SNAP benefits. These issues have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 Pandemic and many clients do not qualify for government stimulus. We address these problems with essential and holistic programs to support clients.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Legal Services

The primary focus of NMIC's legal services program is to prevent evictions and ensure landlord compliance with housing codes.  The practice also includes public benefits, disability, and environmental law, immigration, consumer debt, and family law issues through our domestic violence legal program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NMIC's ESOL and education classes are research-based educational models that address the wide array of ability and need in the community.  Classes and curriculum contextualize content into areas that will be useful and relevant, such as work, school, and community.  We currently offer ESOL, computer classes, civics and citizenship, Adult Basic Education (ABE), Family Literacy, Disconnected youth pre-GED and GED programs, and ESOL/BENL (Basic Education in a Native Language).

Population(s) Served
Adults

NMIC's Social Services programs promote asset building through benefits screening and enrollment, financial counseling, and free tax preparation services; strengthen families by combatting domestic violence; prevent homelessness with intensive case management; and target health problems associated with poverty and poor housing through education about asthma, lead poisoning, and obesity.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NMIc's Community Organizing department has organized hundreds of tenant associations over the past 30 years.  Strategies include direct negotiations with landlords, administrative actions with public agencies and litigation.  NMIC also coordinates the Union Comunal de Washington Heights,  a community association focused on quality of life issues, with a membership of over 2,600 households.  Another role of the Organizing department is that of low-income housing developer; we have cereated 465 units of low-income housing in the community.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Weatherization department offers environmental, health, and economic benefits to our community through the following programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our workforce development program helps the unemployed and underemployed to develop marketable work skills and secure employment in the public and private sectors. Services include case management and goal setting, job readiness training, resume building and interviewing, job placement and retention services, and work support benefits. Our Building Maintenance and Weatherization program prepares residents for Green Jobs through hands-on training in green construction skills.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NMIC is a culturally-specific CBO that established our specialized Domestic Violence Project (DVP) in 1996 to address high DV incidence in Upper Manhattan. DVP empowers underserved Latinx, Spanish-speaking, immigrant domestic violence survivors through victim services that are long term, holistic, community-based, and survivor-driven. These services include telephonic and web-based intake lines; crisis intervention; risk assessment; safety planning; justice system accompaniment and advocacy; civil legal advocacy for immigration, family, housing, and benefits issues; individual and group mental health and support services; and social and economic support that is culturally specific (e.g., in house English-language classes, onsite tax preparation). DVP also educates and raises awareness about DV in our community and coordinates multidisciplinary community responses with the justice system and other organizations. Our bilingual staff provide services to over 700 survivors annually

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United Neighborhood Centers of America 2007

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students per classroom during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

14000 clients served with at least one service.

Number of placements defined as full-time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Workforce Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of attorney volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Immigrants, People of Caribbean descent, People of Central American descent

Related Program

Legal Services

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For over 40 years, our mission has been to serve as a catalyst for positive change in the lives of community members on their paths to secure and prosperous futures. We provide crisis intervention with legal or social services such as eviction prevention and food relief. We then support clients as they define and achieve their own goals—generally through education, workforce training, and/or community organizing. We serve about 14,000 clients a year with a variety of holistic services to keep them financially stable and further their potential. We primarily serve the immigrants community of Upper Manhattan and adjacent Bronx neighborhoods whose resident demographics are 68.1% Latinx and 19.0% Black/African American, and 44.4% foreign born. We seek to ensure the wellbeing of our community members and shrink the many disparities between our client base and their more affluent counterparts.

We provide crisis intervention with legal or social services such as eviction prevention and food relief. We then support clients as they define and achieve their own goals—generally through education, workforce training, and/or community organizing.

Our areas of focus include:

Housing – We offer comprehensive legal services to address eviction, harassment, and repair needs. We offer group representation and tenant association organizing support. We also directly upgrade housing stock through weatherization services, leveraging financing to avoid rent increases for tenants, and our own housing development work.

Immigration - We offer a variety of immigration legal services as well as citizenship preparation classes.

Benefits/Finance - We offer screening and application services for housing, unemployment insurance, SNAP, EITC, and various other benefits. We provide free tax preparation services, including for individuals who use ITINs.

Health – We screen clients and offer treatment for mental health needs. We also provide health insurance enrollment services, health education, and intensive in-home community health services.

Education/Career - Education services offer English for Speakers of Other Languages classes, English conversation sessions, and Adult Basic Education and High School Equivalency exam prep. Our career services connect participants to professional certification courses in customer/food service, security, home health aide, and a variety of other fields. Young adults engage in paid internship programs and all job seekers have access to job readiness training, placement, and retention services.

Holistic Services - This includes domestic violence case management, our work with community union’s, and (most relevant to this proposal) the food pantry for which we are seeking staff funding for from MUFG.

NMIC serves about 14,000 clients each year with the described services and is proud of the ways our clients utilize the opportunities we present.

Our staff is culturally competent, bilingual, and trained in delivering trauma informed services to low-income immigrants. We've been embedded in the community for our 40 years. Our staff of 120 include well-qualified attorneys, organizers, counselors, advocates, and teachers.

Our substantive areas of focus and FY19 accomplishments include:

Housing- We offer comprehensive legal services to address eviction, harassment, and repair needs through over individual 3,000 cases (97% eviction prevention rate). To supplement our individual cases, we offer group representation and tenant association organizing support for 75 buildings with over 900 tenant leaders. We also directly upgrade the housing stock through weatherization services for almost 400 units that leverages over $2.5 million in financing to avoid rent increases for tenants and through housing development work that currently includes three projects with 83 total units under development.

Immigration- We offer a robust set of immigration legal services and handled almost 3,000 unique cases ranging from naturalization to U visas. In addition to our legal services, we offer citizenship preparation classes to clients who are working towards naturalization. 316 clients obtained citizenship and 362 were granted work authorization.

Benefits/Finance- We offer screening and application services for a broad range of benefits that result in almost 2,000 unique benefits approvals with an annual cash value to clients of almost $12,000,000. We also offer free tax preparation services, including for individuals who use ITINs, for 3,500 returns annually that produce almost $6 million in refunds and an additional $2.5 million in EITC benefits. Housing benefits and SNAP benefits were secured by 1,218 and 618 clients, respectively.

Health- Our mental health services allow us to screen 800 clients and offer treatment to the roughly 200 who screen positive for mental health needs. We also provide health insurance enrollment services to almost 1,500 clients (with separately-funded follow up technical support services to ensure clients get the most out of their insurance by addressing questions and billing disputes), health education to 2,000 clients, and intensive in-home community health services to over 200 clients.

Education- Our education services, for which this proposal is written, allow clients to develop their core academic skills and further their opportunities in NYC. Students do this by learning English in ESOL classes (almost 400 students) and supplemental English conversation groups, as well as enrolling in Adult Basic Education and High School Equivalency classes (over 300 students) to earn their High School Equivalency diplomas.

Career- Through our career services participants can enroll in professional certification courses in a variety of fields (e.g., customer/food service, security, home health aide, office technology, etc.) that provide almost 400 credentials annually. Young adults then can participate in a paid internship (almost 60,000 hours annually) and all job seekers have access to job readiness training, placement and retention services (over 200 career placements).

Holistic - We serve 700 DV Victims yearly, and support 2 worker cooperatives.

Financials

NORTHERN MANHATTAN IMPROVEMENT CORP
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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NORTHERN MANHATTAN IMPROVEMENT CORP

Board of directors
as of 1/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sandra Harris

John Lyons

Metropolitan Center for Urban Education at NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education & Human Development

Sandra Harris

Columbia University

Cheryl Kallem

First Manhattan Co.

Evelyn De La Rosa

AT & T Interactive

Edward Cuesta

Dominicanos USA

Seny Taveras

CUNY In The Heights, Hostos Community College

Nathalie Tejada

The Dominican Film Festival in New York

Juan Arteaga, Esq

Crowell & Moring

Ethan Miller

Nathan Cummings Foundation

William Lee

Incentrum Group

Nancy Wackstein

Fordham University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/27/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data