The Tibet Fund

New York, NY   |  http://www.tibetfund.org

Mission

Founded in 1981 under the guidance of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, The Tibet Fund is the primary funding organization for the health, education, refugee rehabilitation, cultural preservation and economic development programs that enable Tibetans in exile and in their homeland to sustain their language, culture and national identity.

Notes from the nonprofit

Message from His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Honorary Patron, The Tibet Fund:

"Since its establishment in 1981, the Tibet Fund has contributed to the building and development of a robust Tibetan community in exile. Over three and a half decades, it has assisted the Tibetan leadership in exile in its work on infrastructural development, refugee rehabilitation, and cultural preservation, while also backing education, healthcare and other capacity-building programs. Through such support, we have been able to strengthen our cultural institutions and undertake projects essential for the preservation of the Tibetan cultural heritage that is the very core of our civilization."

Ruling year info

1987

President

Mr. Lobsang Nyandak

Main address

241 E 32nd St 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10016 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3115145

NTEE code info

Private Grantmaking Foundations (T20)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The very survival and sustenance of Tibet's identity, culture and religion are at stake both in Tibet and in exile—the former because of China's imposition of authoritarian Tibet policies that violate fundamental human rights and freedom of Tibetan people and the latter owing to the need for humanitarian financing and other assistance to help sustain Tibetan refugees in India and Nepal.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Humanitarian Aid

Humanitarian Assistance for Tibetan Refugees in India and Nepal directly supporting 124,328 beneficiaries includes:  1. providing reception and rehabilitation services in New Delhi and Dharamsala for  844 newly-arrived Tibetan refugees;  2. providing health care to 6,164 long-staying Tibetan refugees in India, including for TB treatment, mental and physical disabilities, maternal and child health, and hospitalizations; TB screenings for 24,000 students; health awareness training for 63,000 refugees; and sanitation/clean water projects for 4,806 refugees;  3. providing 2,218 Tibetan refugee children with educational support in India and Nepal; career counseling for 3,609 students in India; and stipends for 6,272 students in traditional learning centers in India;  4. Implementing a new Health Information System in Tibetan health care facilities;  and 5. Health care for 2,730 Tibetan refugees in Nepal including salary support and professional training for health workers in 12 clinics in Nepal; public health training for 3,800 Tibetan refugees in Nepal; and health-related support for 46 destitute seniors in Nepal.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Tibet Fund’s Tibetan Scholarship Program enables Tibetan refugees to earn Masters degrees or one-year certificates at American universities.  Since 1988, 24 scholarship grants from the U.S. State Department have enable the Fund to bring 382 Tibetan students and professionals to study at some of the finest academic institutions including New York University, Columbia University, University of Massachusetts, and others.   With funding from the U.S. State Department, The Tibet Fund has conducted a Cultural and Educational Exchange program since 1997that provides ESL and computer skills training in Tibet and has brought 89 students from Tibet to study in the U.S.   In 2010, the Tibet Fund partnered with Johns Hopkins University and Brandeis University under this program.  The Fund’s Sponsorship Program supported 310 school age children at 41 schools, including 15 disabled children at Ngoenga School.  The Fund also supported 11 Professional Development Scholarships for Tibetans in India and Nepal, a nutritional supplementation program at four Tibetan-run secondary schools, and a non-violence program for Tibetan youth.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In 2010, The Fund’s Sponsorship Program enabled donors to support 151 monks and 71 nuns at 18 monasteries and 12 nunneries in Nepal and India.   The Fund produced Thank You Tibet!, a year-long series of cultural programs in the U.S. to celebrate the exile community’s accomplishments over 50 years in exile.  The Fund also supported various other cultural programs, including Khawa Karpo Cultural Center, which publishes a weekly Tibetan language newspaper; the preservation of Tibetan Buddhism in Mongolia; the Tibetan Film Archive; a documentary film about environmental degradation on the Tibetan plateau; and the Tibetan Community of New York and New Jersey. 
(http://www.tibetfund.org/donate.html)

Population(s) Served
Adults

Community Development:  The Fund provided general support for:  the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala, India; old age homes in Kalimpong, India and Kathmandu, Nepal; and emergency relief for survivors of the 2009 earth quake in Yushu, Tibet and massive floods in Ladakh. Health:  The Fund provided general support for Tibetan Delek Hospital in Dharamsala; a Tuberculosis prevention and treatment pilot program at Delek Hospital; and additional health care programs in Nepal.
Tibet Assistance Program:  The Fund provided assistance to two orphanages in Lhasa and an orphanage in Qinghai, Tibet; scholarships to two Tibetan medical students; support for eye care clinics in remote areas of Tibet; and a Montessori training program for primary teachers in Tibet.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Humanitarian Aid

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Humanitarian Aid

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Education and Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2nd Tibetan Civil Society Organization Conference

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Tibet Fund's mission is to preserve the distinct cultural and national identity of the Tibetan people. The Tibet Fund aims to promote self-reliance and sustain the cohesiveness of the Tibetan community in exile, and to assist the most impoverished and marginalized Tibetans in Tibet.

The Tibet Fund plays a key role in connecting sources of funding, primarily from the U.S., to programs that support the Tibetan people, primarily in the education, health, and livelihoods sectors.

Key strategies in the education sector are increasing access to higher education, both in South Asia and in the U.S., through scholarship programs, test preparation coaching, and counseling; improving the quality of education in more than 75 Tibetan refugee schools through teacher professional development and training, early grade reading skills improvement, student leadership training, and science education investments; and Tibetan education system capacity strengthening.

In the health sector The Tibet Fund's key strategy is strengthening capacity of the Tibetan health system in exile, which delivers essential health services for over 107,000 Tibetans through a network of more than 50 primary health centers, clinics, and hospitals administered by the Central Tibetan Administration Health Department in India and Nepal. Capacity strengthening focuses in particular on TB prevention and treatment, maternal and child health, community health education, health information systems, and health system financing.

Key strategies in the livelihoods sector are enterprise development and training for small and aspiring entrepreneurs; employable skills training for unemployed youth; improved agro techniques, farming technologies, crop varieties, and marketing support for disadvantaged farmers; and capacity strengthening for local implementing partner organizations.

With its head office in New York and a field office in India, The Tibet Fund has a highly qualified staff that enables the organization both to communicate the needs and priorities of the Tibetan people with a high degree of effectiveness, and to successfully manage complex working relationships between supporters in the U.S. and key implementing partner organizations in the field, most prominently the Central Tibetan Administration. 80% of The Tibet Fund's staff is Tibetan and its management team has extensive qualified senior leadership and management experience, including extensive expertise administering federal grants totaling over $61,448,402 million from the U.S. State Department and USAID.

For almost 40 years The Tibet Fund has been the primary funding organization for education, health care, livelihoods improvement, cultural preservation, refugee protection and rehabilitation, elder care, and community development programs, serving more than 100,000 Tibetan refugees living in India and Nepal each year.

Through our education, health, and livelihoods programs we have positively impacted the life of every Tibetan in exile, either as a direct beneficiary, a beneficiary's family member, or both. Through our refugee protection program, since 1990 The Tibet Fund has directly impacted the life of every refugee that has arrived in exile from Tibet, providing more than 64,000 men, women, and children with food, shelter, clothing, health care, legal and physical protection, and safe transition support to enter refugee schools, monasteries, and nunneries after arriving from Tibet. By helping to sustain and strengthen the self-reliance of the Tibetan community in exile, The Tibet Fund has contributed to the preservation of the distinct cultural and national identity of the Tibetan people as a whole.

We have yet to accomplish these goals, or achieve the same depth and breadth of impact, for Tibetans living inside Tibet.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Tibet Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Tibet Fund

Board of directors
as of 11/19/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Michael Lemle

The Tibet Fund


Board co-chair

Mr. Geoffrey Menin

The Tibet Fund

Rinchen Dharlo

Ex-Officio

Jessica Brackman

Director

Shep Gordon

Director

Yodon Thonden

Director

Thubten Jinpa Langri

Director

Elizabeth Lindsey

Director

Tsewang Namgyal

Director

Jane Wells

Director

Joseph Wood

Director

Jigme Shingsar

Director

Tenzin Lama

Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/19/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/19/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.