Food Bank For New York City

New York, NY   |  https://www.foodbanknyc.org/

Mission

The mission of Food Bank For New York City is to end hunger by organizing food, information and support for community survival, and dignity. Food Bank For New York City has been working to end food poverty in our five boroughs for 35 years. As the city’s largest hunger-relief organization, we employ a multifaceted approach centered on helping low-income New Yorkers overcome their circumstances and achieve greater independence.

Ruling year info

1983

President & CEO

Mrs. Leslie Gordon

Main address

39 Broadway, 10th Floor

New York, NY 10006 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3179546

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food Bank For New York City is NYC’s largest hunger-relief organization. We distribute food and resources through our network of nearly 1,000 food pantries, soup kitchens, schools, and other partners. More than 1.1 million New Yorkers were experiencing food insecurity before the pandemic and that number has only grown over the past year. Food Bank projects that nearly 1.6 million NYC residents (~19 percent of the population) will experience food insecurity in 2021 due to the economic fallout of COVID-19. People who had never set foot on a pantry line have now become regular clients. Essential workers, furloughed employees, single parents, and seniors have all turned to us to fill in food gaps for themselves and their families during this challenging time. More and more New Yorkers are depending on us to make ends meet, so we’re working to provide more resources to our member agencies on the ground and implement new strategies to fight hunger wherever it exists.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hunger Relief

Since 1983, Food Bank For New York City has been the city’s major hunger-relief organization working to end hunger throughout the five boroughs. In New York City, nearly one in five residents – primarily the working poor, the elderly, veterans, and people with disabilities – relies on us for food and other resources to address their food insecurity and associated poverty needs. Since enacting our emergency response to COVID-19 in March 2020, we’ve provided over 100 million free, nutritious meals to New Yorkers across the five boroughs, an increase of 61 percent in overall food distribution compared to the same time period last year. We’ve distributed over 1.3 million lbs. of non-food items, such as personal care and menstrual hygiene products, baby essentials like diapers and formula, and PPE equipment. We’ve also shifted all direct services to remote support via our SNAP call center, which has seen an increase in call volume of between 350-600 percent since mid-March.

Food Bank takes a strategic, multifaceted approach that provides meals and builds capacity in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among all New Yorkers. Foundational to our approach is a strong network of 925 member agencies - each an emergency food provider committed to serving the City’s most food insecure residents. Our initial focus on food distribution has expanded to a range of anti-hunger solutions with the ultimate goal of helping struggling New Yorkers feed their families, eat nutritious foods on a limited budget, and become more self-sufficient. Since the pandemic, we’ve focused this mission even more by identifying 22 Community Response Partners (CRPs) across the five boroughs to better help us serve the communities hardest hit by the economic fallout of COVID-19. Through these CRPs, we’ve been able to distribute more than 24 million meals to New Yorkers in high-need areas. We’ve also launched a new Mobile Pantry Program, which allows us to get resources into neighborhoods that need even more assistance.

Throughout the pandemic, we also conducted food distributions throughout the city at what we called our “Pop-Up Distributions.” These sporadic programs were managed directly by Food Bank and occurred at iconic locations throughout the city, such as Barclays Center, Yankee Stadium, and Lincoln Center. Approximately 752,233 meals have been provided through these distributions at 60 different locations.
Food Bank’s income support services, including food stamps (also known as SNAP) and free tax assistance for the working poor, put nearly $38 million into the pockets of New Yorkers last year, helping them to afford food and achieve greater dignity and independence. Food Bank’s nutrition education programs and services empower more than 23,000 children, teens and adults to sustain a healthy diet and active lifestyle on a limited budget.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Health, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Sexual identity

Related Program

Hunger Relief

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than 100 million meals in 2020. 1.25 lbs. = 1 meal

Tax refunds and Earned Income Tax Credits returned to NYers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status, Health, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Hunger Relief

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than $30 million dollars in cash returned to NYers and the business marketplace from tax refunds and earned income tax credits

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Health, Social and economic status, Sexual identity, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Hunger Relief

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our board members each give or get a gift each year to support the mission. We strive for 100% giving among board members which is the year by year result you see here.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Food Bank For New York City aims to provide New Yorkers with the food and resources they need today to build a better tomorrow. As New York City’s primary distributor of emergency food, Food Bank secures, transports, and distributes resources to 925 partners across the five boroughs, which includes emergency and community food programs, disaster food partners, and campus pantries in K-12 schools and colleges. At a time when 91 percent of these member agencies are reporting an increase of first-time visitors, we aim to support our network with the food and resources their clients desperately need.

It’s worth noting, too, that many of our local soup kitchens and food pantries are still unable to re-open because of COVID. More than one in nine (or 11 percent) of our member agencies remain closed, which means certain communities no longer have ready access to free and nutritious food. In those neighborhoods, many families are struggling with food insecurity, and yet the support network they’ve come to depend upon is not operating at full strength. That’s a big reason why we identified our contingent of 22 Community Response Partners, so that we could establish a solid presence in each and every borough. Our Mobile Pantry Program is also working to fill the access gaps that COVID has left behind.

To better support our ever-growing network of food pantries, soup kitchens, and schools, fighting hunger at the frontlines, we recently made a $14 million investment directly into our member network. Representing one of the largest investments in Food Bank’s 37-year history, we are aiming to address key areas of need through a four-pillar strategy of food grants, operational and capacity grants, healthcare partnerships, and a Mobile Pantry Program.

Food Grants – As the first pillar of our member investment strategy, we’re increasing both the quantity and frequency of our food deliveries, focusing on communities hit hardest by the pandemic. This includes areas like the Bronx, where a recent report found that one in 10 residents had visited a food pantry or soup kitchen due to COVID.

Operational and Capacity grants – Along with providing our members with more food, we’re also helping to provide the operational means to get that food to their communities. La Jornada food pantry in Queens, for example, was awarded a capacity grant to buy a forklift to increase distribution efficiency.

Healthcare Partnerships – Healthcare providers are often the first to identify the signs of food insecurity and its link to costly, and preventable chronic conditions like obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. So, we’re investing in Food Bank’s long-standing relationships with local hospitals by bringing them into our member network.

Mobile Pantry Program – As discussed earlier, we’re also pouring money and resources into our new Mobile Pantry Program, which will visit different sites each week to provide meals and shelf-stable goods to people where they live.

We’re also innovating new ways to leverage technology to help address ongoing safety concerns around social distancing. This includes creating a new “contact-free” client intake and registration solution for all our member agencies engaged in direct service, including food distributions. Food Bank will provide barcode scanners, software and training for sites to be able to give every registered client an ID card with a unique barcode. The scanners will allow them to check-in clients from a safe distance, minimizing contact between staff, clients, and other surfaces.

For decades, Food Bank’s multi-pronged approach has included supporting low-income families to afford more food and other necessities. Our strategy includes equipping our 925 member agencies to better address the critical needs of those who rely upon them on an ongoing basis. Going forward, we are focusing a wealth of resources, including training, capacity grants, technology, and technical assistance, to equip hundreds of emergency food providers across the city to be better able to move the most vulnerable residents closer to food security and financial stability.

2020 has been a year like no other, both for our organization and the world. As the city’s largest hunger relief organization, we’re used to providing millions of meals a year to our neighbors in need. But the challenges of this pandemic have shown us that our capacity to give extends far beyond providing meals and shelf-stable goods to our clients, though those obviously remain important to us and our mission to fight hunger.

To address the growing and nuanced needs of this pandemic, we deployed a multi-faceted emergency response to safely distribute food and other resources more quickly than ever before by working closely with our partners in the public, private, and non-profit spheres. Since the start of our response, we’ve provided over 100 million free meals to our neighbors across the five boroughs. In January 2021 alone, we distributed nearly 6 million meals, marking a 36 percent increase compared to last January’s distribution. We’ve also collaborated with other hunger relief organizations in the city that aren’t in our member network; in fact, nearly 7 million meals have been provided in partnership with organizations like the Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA), Women in Need (WIN), Administration of Children Services (ACS), Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP), and New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).

In addition to food distributions, we’ve also worked to take our mission online through workshops on nutrition education and financial empowerment. In the past year, we’ve provided virtual nutrition education to SNAP-eligible populations through our SNAP-Ed nutrition education programs, which normally serve over 12,000 K-5 students across the city. We’ve also modified our community-based direct nutrition education workshops to operate virtually as well as outdoors. So far, we’ve conducted 48 in-person, socially distanced workshops and 48 virtual workshops with over 1,000 participants. As of this writing, we’ve held 44 virtual workshops on financial empowerment, which have been attended by well over 800 individuals. And as always, we’re offering free tax filing to the working poor to ensure that they receive their maximum refunds without having to worry about tax prep fees.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Low -income New Yorkers and the organizations who provide food assistance programs to support them.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through recent surveys and nonprofit partner self reporting, Food Bank has learned about the increased needs to sustain food assistance programs who are seeing an increase of up to 60% more visits to over the last 12 months. Food Bank has increased general operating support, food and capital equipment resources.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It's helped Food Bank demonstrate our commitment to take the learnings from partner feedback to create greater access to resources.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Food Bank For New York City
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Food Bank For New York City

Board of directors
as of 5/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Seraina Macia

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Reverend Henry Belin

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Jack F. Fritts

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Lee Brian Schrager

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Gloria Pitagorsky

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Kevin Frisz

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Lauren Lauren

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Katie Lee

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Seraina Macia

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Nicolas Poitevin

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Lary Stromfeld

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Pastor Michael Walrond

First Corinthian Baptist Church

George Garfunkel

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Kyra Sedwick

Actor, Producer and Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.