Doe Fund, Inc.

Work works!

aka The Doe Fund / Ready, Willing & Able   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.doe.org

Mission

The Doe Fund's mission is to develop and implement cost-effective, holistic programs that meet the needs of a diverse population working to break the cycles of homelessness, addiction, and criminal recidivism. All of The Doe Fund's programs and innovative business ventures ultimately strive to help homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals achieve permanent self-sufficiency.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please note that The Doe Fund's FY 18 audited financial statement for 7/1/18 - 6/30/18 was uploaded 12/13/18.

Ruling year info

1988

President

Ms. Harriet McDonald

Main address

345 East 102nd Street, #305

New York, NY 10029 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3412540

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Transitional Care, Half-Way House for Offenders/Ex-Offenders (I31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Currently New York City is faced with 58,000 to 60,000 homeless people on any given day. At The Doe Fund's three transitional residences in Central Harlem and Central Brooklyn, the 660 men we work with each day have multiple factors contributing to their being homeless, in addition to skyrocketing housing prices. In FY18, 58% of our residents had not completed high school, 79% reported substance abuse issues, 100% were unemployed, and 32% had just been released from incarceration in the past 180 days. Incarceration for all admitted averages over 11 years of imprisonment per person - a number that continues to escalate. Twenty-six percent were age 30 or under, 82% were African American / Black, with the remaining percentage almost entirely Hispanic.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Doe Fund - Ready, Willing & Able

Paid job training and work programs, housing, supportive services and business ventures, homeless services, workforce development, prisoner reentry, low-income and special needs housing, Ready, Willing & Able.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Incarcerated people, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Doe Fund - Ready, Willing & Able

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average hourly wage of clients who became employed after job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Incarcerated people, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Doe Fund - Ready, Willing & Able

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of graduates who maintain their job for at least 3 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Incarcerated people, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Doe Fund - Ready, Willing & Able

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage decrease in recidivism rates of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Adults, Incarcerated people

Related Program

The Doe Fund - Ready, Willing & Able

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A 2018 study by the NYS DCJS found the 3-year felony conviction rate of formerly incarcerated graduates was 62% lower than demographically identical individuals who dropped out after 60 days or fewer.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Doe Fund's mission is to break the cycles of homelessness, addiction, and recidivism to help New York City’s highly vulnerable homeless and formerly incarcerated individuals achieve permanent self-sufficiency.

The Doe Fund has stood out from most non-profits serving the homeless in these areas:

1. A culture of work: A resident has the opportunity to earn a paycheck on day one at The Doe Fund for participating in work preparation and in-depth skill training.

2. Wraparound services for multiple issues: In addition to paid training and work, The Doe Fund provides computer training, education, 12-steps with weekly testing to prove abstinence, case management, medical services, child support payments, daily meals, housing and job placements, and other resources to build self-sufficiency.

3. Social enterprises that create paid training and work: The Doe Fund creates public/private partnerships for social enterprises that result in paid on-the-job training and employment opportunities. Social enterprises include:
- Street cleaning for BIDS and parks
- On-the-job construction training
- Pest control "Pests at Rest" business
- "Dishes by Doe" catering and farmers' market business

The Doe Fund operates 3 transitional residences in Central Harlem and Central Brooklyn for 660 per day, and has built and now operates 7 permanent affordable / supportive / scattered site housing developments for another 500+ residents.

Our unique "Ready, Willing & Able" paid training program for our 660 transitional residents is made possible by public / private social enterprise partnerships with over 50 businesses to create paid on-the-job training and jobs:

- The Doe Fund contracts with Business Improvement Districts and Public Parks for our paid work preparation street cleaning program.

- We contract with NYC Economic Development Corporation (EDC) to hire 100 employees each year from our pool of residents and from the surrounding communities to work in public facilities.

- We serve as a recruitment site for Workforce1 particularly for maintance and construction hiring.

- We ensure trainees are prepared - in FY18 trainees earned 567 industry recognized certifications.

FY18 outcomes for The Doe Fund's transitional residence program:

• # admitted to 3 residences: 1,258
• # in "Ready, Willing & Able" work preparation and advanced occupational training: 1,107
• # industry-recognized certifications earned: 567 (FY17)
• # trainees who obtained jobs: 262
• % 6-month job retention: 66%
• # placed in housing: 340

Recidivism: A 2010 study by Dr. Bruce Western at Harvard University showed that RWA reduces future felony convictions by 60% and the risk of police contact of any kind by one-third. In 2017, The Doe Fund studied a sample of 446 RWA program graduates from 2009-2015 with prior incarcerations in New York State. Of this sample, 385 (86.3%) showed no instances of recidivism in NYC within three years of graduating from RWA. That data is now being validated by New York State.

National expansion: The Doe Fund's first launch of "Ready, Willing & Able America" in Philadelphia is now becoming an independent 501c3 as we prepare to replicate in new cities

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Doe Fund was formed as a New York State (NYS) not-for-profit corporation in 1987. The primary goal of TDF since its inception has been to help clients achieve maximum levels of economic self-sufficiency. It helps individuals with histories of homelessness, substance use, criminal justice system involvement, and persons living with HIV/AIDS. Many clients belong to more than one of these populations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently added a Carpentry and Welding training program and did so in response to feedback from participants in our program that they wanted skilled trades.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It shifted our relationship in the sense that they feel empowered and valued. When those you serve feel that way it makes for a much better relationship.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Doe Fund, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Doe Fund, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Steve Koppel

Attorney (Partner), Sidley Austin LLP

Term: 2020 -

Harriet McDonald

The Doe Fund

Nadia Block

Block Family Foundation

Christian Diez

Two Sigma Private Investments

Frank Gribbon

FDNY

Melique Jones

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

Sunil Kapadia

Google

Steve Koppel

Sidley Austin LLP

Rob Morse

PDT Partners

Julian Riley, Jr.

Harlem Blue Premium Beer

David Shapiro

KPS Capital Partners

Bill Thompson

Siebert Cisneros Shank & Co., LLC

Jesse Wilkins

Preston and Wilkins, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.