COVENANT HOUSE ALASKA

aka CHA   |   Anchorage, AK   |  www.covenanthouseak.org

Mission

The Covenant House mission is to serve the suffering children of the street with absolute respect and unconditional love.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Ms. Alison E Kear

Main address

755 'A' Street

Anchorage, AK 99501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3419755

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Organization-Sponsored Eatery or Agency (K35)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to “serve the suffering children of the street and to protect and safeguard all children." Covenant House Alaska meets our kids where they are, often on the streets, and develops a trusting relationship. On the streets our youth have few choices and are at a high risk of being exploited, victimized and trafficked. Alaskan youth who become homeless struggle with three issues similar to many families in the nation: mental health and substance abuse issues; education or employment failures; and lack of affordable housing. But, Alaska's youth experience the added challenges of living in a state that is geographically isolated, has a harsh, dark, arctic climate eight months a year and has one of the nation's highest rates of alcohol abuse, domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault and suicide. Covenant House provides the safety net and resources to bring kids off the street and give them a new hope for the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Engagement Center (YEC)

Covenant House Alaska serves over 3,700 runaway and homeless youth, ages 13-20, per year. Our programs include: Street Outreach four days/nights a week on the streets of Anchorage, and one in the Mat-Su Valley Crisis Center - a 40 hour a week Drop-In Center where any youth can use the phone, restrooms and eat, a 60-bed youth emergency shelter, Employment & Educational Services - job development and placement for youth, Advocacy - providing a voice for youth, Youth Enrichment Program - providing leadership, recreation & art activities, and Pastoral Ministry - providing spiritual guidance to youth seeking it.

Population(s) Served

CHA's transitional living programs provide homeless youth with a safe, stable environment while assisting them in learning skills for independent living. Youth can stay up to 18 months, depending on their need.

Rights of Passage is a 14 bed facility with young adults ages 18-21.

Passage House is a residential home for five young mothers and their children.

Population(s) Served

A TLP for youth ages 18-24, with 25 beds. It is similar to dorm-style living, where youth do their own laundry and prepare their own meals, with common spaces for them to interact, make and share meals together. ROP Case Managers help them to manage their finances, and they pay a proportionate amount of rent if employed or need to be job searching or in school.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Young adults
Young adults

A TLP for pregnant or parenting young women ages 16-24, and their babies. It is a five bedroom house where, in addition to the aforementioned independent living skills, they learn about healthy child development, parenting skills, stress management tools, and are connected to mentors.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

A five bedroom house but is structured differently than a TLP. It is a therapeutic group home for young men ages 17-19 who have mental health and/or severe emotional disturbance diagnoses that have impeded their success at independence in the past. The Program Director stays on-site and helps youth to learn how to manage their specific mental/emotional health challenges so that they can graduate to independent living.

Population(s) Served

Anchorage received a grant from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development to design and implement new programs to address youth homelessness. Our progress is being observed at the Federal level to help inform possible nationwide strategies to end youth homelessness across the country. The two projects in YHDP that Covenant House Alaska operates are Rapid ReHousing and our team of Permanency Navigators.

Population(s) Served

Participates in the city-wide Coordinated Entry efforts (described below) to house youth identified as "the most vulnerable." We have developed relationships with landlords around the city with whom we work to get youth into one of a network of scattered-site apartments that meet their needs. Our Rapid Rehousing Case Managers stay in close contact with each youth for up to a year in order to help them remain successful in their housing situation.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Young adults
Young adults
Young adults
Young adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With a mission “to serve suffering children of the street, and to protect and safeguard all children," Covenant House Alaska (CHA) opened its doors in 1988 as a shelter for homeless youth (ages 13 to 20) in Anchorage. Over the years CHA has grown from an emergency shelter to an organization that provides a system of transformative care that helps youth attain self-sufficiency. More than 26,000 youth have walked through our doors. Some come for just a bed for the night, but many also receive medical care, help getting back into school, family reunification, or services that lead to independence through education and employment.

Most services are delivered at our Youth Engagement Center (YEC), a multipurpose facility that houses our continuum of care. The primary program is a 60-bed emergency shelter which is open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. The shelter provides a safe place to meet the basic needs of homeless, trafficked and at-risk youth: shelter, food, clothing and crisis resolution. A non-residential Drop-In Center provides walk-in services to youth including employment and education assistance, on-site health care, counseling, phone and mail services and case management. A Street Outreach Team operates out the of YEC and provides basic services to youth on the street to help meet their immediate needs while providing a gateway to our shelter services or other stable, safe places to stay. Three transitional living programs operate off-site; one is for single youth (ages 18-21) and two other programs are for single young mothers (ages 18-21) and their children. Other programs include Education + Employment Services, a Wellness Center (primary health care clinic), substance abuse and mental health counseling, life skills training and youth enrichment including art, music, and physical activity. All services are delivered through a positive youth development framework and are trauma-informed, utilizing evidence-based practices with all staff receiving ongoing training.

CHA's vision is to provide a system of transformative care for homeless, runaway, and trafficked youth -- a system that includes a continuum of services and actively evaluates the effectiveness of our efforts. Services begin with street outreach as our first point of engagement, to emergency shelter, and when youth are stable enough, participation in transitional housing program(s) and aftercare. Support services such as medical, behavioral health, education, employment including financial literacy, legal, youth leadership/advocacy and access to art, music, and physical activity are provided onsite at our 42,000 sq.ft. Youth Engagement Center. We've committed to working with partners in the community and encouraging them to deliver their services in our Youth Engagement Center, on-site to minimize duplication of efforts, the barriers to access our youth traditionally experience, and to be deliberate about engaging in the efforts truly needed to end youth homelessness. CHA has a long history of providing shelter and support services to homeless, runaway and trafficked youth in Alaska and has developed a rich continuum of residential and support services to equip youth to move from a state of surviving to one of thriving.

CHA has been working with homeless, trafficked and at-risk youth since 1988, and we provide a robust continuum of services that address all of the domains of a young person's life. Over the years CHA has grown from an emergency shelter to an organization that provides a system of transformative care that helps youth attain self-sufficiency. More than 26,000 youth have walked through our doors. All services are delivered through a positive youth development framework and are trauma-informed, utilizing evidence-based practices with all staff receiving ongoing training.

Covenant House Alaska's innovative methods and leadership have gained the attention and investment of other funders. Last year, CHA received a prestigious grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation as part of their national Learn and Earn to Achieve Potential (LEAP) Initiative to bolster our Education + Employment Services program. CHA was one of 10 organizations chosen out of over 200 applicants in the U.S. to implement this initiative. Through the LEAP Initiative, CHA has implemented Jobs for America's Graduates (JAG), an evidence-based curriculum designed to help youth graduate and then transition into quality jobs. The JAG model is geared toward youth who are not in school, with a focus on youth from foster care and juvenile justice systems. JAG has been implemented in 32 states, and in 2013-2014 it demonstrated a nationwide graduation rate of 93%.

In 2018, Anchorage was honored to be one of 10 cities nationwide selected by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to implement its new Youth Homelessness Demonstration Project (YHDP), a national two-year pilot program which includes $1.5 million in funding each year for Anchorage organizations to target unaddressed gaps in resources that contribute to youth homelessness. Covenant House Alaska led the processes and community conversations that led to Anchorage's application for this award, and has been identified as the Lead Agency. Along with other youth service providers in the community, the goal is to identify new, innovative programs and strategies to end youth homelessness that will be a model for communities across the nation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CHA serves young people in Alaska ages 13 to 24 who are experiencing homelessness, trafficking and exploitation. Over 50% of the young people we serve on an annual basis are Alaska Native. There are a high proportion of young people who are involved in child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Young people have consistently requested more decision-making roles. CHA spurred the creation of Anchorage’s Youth Task Force (YFT), an advocacy group comprised mostly of young people who have experienced homelessness and were clients of Covenant House Alaska. The YTF was instrumental in Anchorage receiving one of the nation’s first Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program awards. The Task Force identified two new, innovative projects that were implemented by CHA: Permanency Navigators and Host Homes. The YTF approved Anchorage’s Community Plan to End Homelessness, which included these projects, before being submitted to HUD (a requirement of HUD). To support the sustainability of YTF, CHA created an Americorp VISTA position to sustain and elevate the work of the Task Force.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Based on feedback from the young people we serve, CHA created formal decision making bodies led by young people. The first one was the Youth Task Force, which continues to advise CHA and the Anchorage Coalition to End Homelessness. CHA created a Youth Champion Fellow, who will report to CHA’s Director of Equity and Inclusion and will serve as a voting member on the CHA Board of Directors. They will champion client voices to ensure their interests are at the forefront of CHA decision-making. CHA also changed hiring practices to prioritize youth with lived experience. To facilitate this, CHA allows for years of lived experience as substitution for education or job experience. We value the unique insight that young people have gained through their experiences with homelessness, trafficking or

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

COVENANT HOUSE ALASKA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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COVENANT HOUSE ALASKA

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Amy Miller

Providence Health & Services


Board co-chair

Mrs. Carol Gore

Cook Inlet Housing Authority

Judith Crotty

Wells Fargo

Lisa Rieger

Cook Inlet Tribal Council

Mike Mills

Dorsey & Whitney, LLP

Scott Medlock

St. Patrick's Catholic Church

Maureen Moore

GCI

Carol Gore

Cook Inlet Housing Authority

Bob Flint, Esq.

Community Volunteer

Grace Greene

TOTE Maritime Alaska

Lisa Bruner

ConocoPhillips

Denali Kemppel

Hilcorp Alaska

Kate Slyker

GCI

Carl Swanson

Kurt Parkan

Julie Sullivan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data