PLATINUM2023

NYC Outward Bound Schools

aka NYC Outward Bound   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.nycoutwardbound.org

Mission

NYC Outward Bound Schools’ mission is to support NYC young people in developing the knowledge and skills to lead with confidence and curiosity, persist in the face of challenge, and live fulfilling lives. We believe in the interdependence of social-emotional and academic development and bring this to life via a suite of student programming that harnesses adventure and the healing power of the outdoors along with teacher/leader coaching and professional learning to support deeper learning in the classroom. We intentionally serve a diverse population of the City’s young people and put principles of equity and inclusion at the center of our work. By working with networks of schools and partnering with NYC’s Department of Education, we aim to make real and systemic changes in NYC's schools.

Ruling year info

1989

President & CEO

Vanessa Rodriguez

Main address

29-46 Northern Blvd 4 floor

New York, NY 11101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3471084

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the mix of strategies that will allow NYC Outward Bound Schools to have the greatest possible impact on New York City’s public school system and the students it serves in ways that are financially sustainable?a better world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NYC Outward Bound Network Schools

We operate a citywide network of public schools in partnership with the NYC Department of Education that fully embody our educational approach and closely mirror the city’s public schools demographically. Our schools help students develop the social, emotional and academic skills needed to lead their own learning and make meaningful connections to the world around them. We support students to think critically, rather than passively absorb information, and develop the skills necessary to thrive. We coach educators and school leaders to provide relevant and engaging academics and to implement Crew, our signature advisory program. We also provide outdoor adventure programming to students.

Our network is mainly comprised of district schools but also includes one public charter school. All of our schools are “unscreened,” which means that there are no tests or other special requirements for admission. Together they serve as innovation hubs and proof points for our vision.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
Children and youth

We provide a menu of outdoor adventure programs to our partner schools that are designed to increase a student’s sense of belonging and agency. When students feel they are part of a supportive community and have ownership over where they’re headed in the future, this can have a powerful impact on both wellness and academic success. Our programs range from 1-3 days and are adapted to best meet each school’s needs and are one part of a larger suite of supports that we provide to our partner schools. Delivered as part of a more comprehensive engagement with a school, we find that impact is sustainable — the experiences are catalytic and the skills are transferable and foster classroom environments that continue to incubate and grow the skills learned during an outdoor program. Participating in a program led to a:
- 19% increase in sense of belonging
- 22% increase in collaboration
- 17% increase in sense of agency

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Through our proven Select Strategies, developed and established in our Network Schools, we are bringing our most effective work to scale, reaching even more students and their schools. We partner with schools to improve a specific aspect of their practice and/or school culture by adopting high-impact strategies used in our Network Schools. These strategies help students develop the social, emotional and academic skills needed to lead their own learning and make meaningful connections to the world around them. We coach school leaders and educators to engage in practices that support students to think critically, rather than passively absorb information, and develop the skills necessary to thrive.

Typical partnerships involve 12 to 30 days of support, which can include large group professional learning, individualized onsite coaching, and direct student services. In addition, schools may choose to include for students and/or teachers to complement and enhance the core services.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In 2021, we launched our Crew Initiative which is our most ambitious effort to date to bring our powerful educational approach and proven practices to more schools. Crew, our high-impact advisory program, is a proven vehicle for addressing the social-emotional and academic needs of students and for catalyzing inclusive, supportive school cultures. As a key structure in our Network Schools we have repeatedly seen how Crew leads to more vibrant and connected school communities where every student feels a strong sense of belonging that leads to measurable academic outcomes. Through this Initiative we are bringing Crew to over 50 NYC public schools beyond our Network. Crew has the potential to help schools across NYC create communities where all students--and particularly low-income students of color—are well-known, supported, and cared for so that they can successfully reach their academic, career and life goals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

New York Times Company Nonprofit Excellence Award Finalist 2011

Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Related Program

NYC Outward Bound Network Schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We worked with fewer students during the 2020-21 due to the pandemic as we had to cancel all of our Spring field programs and many of our Select Strategies programs.

Percent of students graduating high school on-time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

NYC Outward Bound Network Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are the annual graduation rates for students enrolled in our Network Schools

Percent of graduates enrolled in college within 6 months of high school graduation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Related Program

NYC Outward Bound Network Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our rates have been higher than national average for 7 years. The fluctuation is due to the addition of a very high poverty school to our network.

Percent of students persisting from freshman to sophomore year in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adolescents, Young adults

Related Program

NYC Outward Bound Network Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This rate went down in 2020 because we added a new very high needs school to our network.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal is to establish NYC Outward Bound Schools as a growing and influential educational organization whose schools and programs are consistently excellent and serve as models for others.

Our ultimate aim is to help ensure all students in NYC public schools receive an excellent education that joins together rigorous and engaging learning with an emphasis on community and character to help all students achieve at high levels in college, careers and as active citizens in their community.

1. Grow our footprint in the NYC public school system and build our capacity to disseminate our educational approach.

2. Prioritize diversity, equity and inclusion, and strengthen our capacity to work with Black & Brown students.

3. Adopt an adaptive approach to our work with schools.

Guided by a set of strategic priorities that drive us to be more focused on impact and equity, NYC Outward Bound Schools is strengthening and expanding our work to provide opportunities and critical supports to the young people of NYC and their public schools. These include a network of high-performing public schools that we support with a comprehensive suite of services for teachers, leaders, college counselors, and students; a range of programming for the students and alumni of these schools aimed at postsecondary planning and success; our citywide “Crew Initiative,” which is bringing our distinctive student advisory and support structure to another 50 public schools this year; as well as student and educator programs rooted in our strongest practices, such as team building, project-based learning, and student-engaged assessment. In all, we are poised to work with 100 schools this year alone, reaching over 35,000 students, which represents a significant increase in scale over the 31 schools and 16,000 students we served last year.

The events of the 2020-21 school year—a global pandemic, calls for racial justice, and an unprecedented shift to remote school—have highlighted the challenges and inequities faced by many of America’s young people. Our educational approach and set of supports for schools are well-aligned to meet students' current needs such as ensuring that their social-emotional needs are attended to, what they are learning is relevant to them and racially accurate, and they are well prepared and supported to be successful after high school.

We have established a network of schools that consistently surpass the citywide averages in terms of student achievement outcomes and they continue to make annual progress towards meeting our even higher aspirational goals. Together with our partners at EL Education, we are promoting an expanded definition of student achievement that includes but is not limited to test scores, encompassing mastery of knowledge and skills, character, and high-quality student work.

The graduation rates at our schools routinely surpass the citywide rates overall and by subgroups. The graduation rates for our Black, Latinx and students with disabilities subgroups all surpassed the citywide rate. And 97% of our students were accepted to college.

The work we do in NYC public schools is having an impact not only on individual students and schools but on the City’s public school system. We aim to bring our approach and our most effective and replicable practices to a growing number of public schools and youth-serving organizations outside of our network through our Adventure and Team Building programs and our Select Strategies professional learning services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

NYC Outward Bound Schools
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NYC Outward Bound Schools

Board of directors
as of 10/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gifford Miller

Signature Urban Properties

Mark Abramowitz

Troutman Sanders LLP (retired)

David Dase

Goldman Sachs and Co

LaRue Gibson

Hightower LRG Wealth Advisors

Jane Greenman

Jeffrey Gural

Newmark Grubb Knight Frank

Gifford Miller

Miller Strategies

Jonathan Miller

Miller Ryan LLC

Lisa Moran

Employment Practices Group, LLC

Joel Perelmuth

Perelmuth & Associates

Konrad Schwarz

Capital One

Vicki Foley

Josh Struzziery

Goldman Sachs

Burt Staniar

Knoll (retired)

Allen Burton

O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Quemuel Arroyo

NYC Department of Transportation

Steven Bussey

Alvarez & Marsal

Allison Feldman

Dwight School

Bonnie Klein

Alphonse Lembo

Monadnock Construction

Jennifer Stredler

Amanda Vaughn

Bank of America

Patricia Francy

Old Westbury Funds of Bessemer Trust Co.

Eric Gioia

UBS

Kimberly Grant

Pryor Cashman LLP

Timothy Greensfelder

AIG

Dwayne Andrews

Patrick B. Jenkins & Associates

Liza Burnett Fefferman

Paramount

Allison Feldman

Dwight School

Dwaine Millard

Scholastic

Suzanne Yadav

John Mahoney

Goldman Sachs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/30/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.