PLATINUM2023

Violence Intervention Program, Inc.

aka VIP Mujeres   |   New York, NY   |  www.vipmujeres.org

Mission

Violence Intervention Program's mission is to lead Latina victims of domestic violence to safety, empower them to live free of violence and to help them reach and sustain their full potential. We pursue our mission by raising community awareness, engaging in activism and providing culturally competent services.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Margarita Guzman

Main address

Triborough Station, PO Box 1161

New York, NY 10035 USA

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EIN

13-3540337

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Communications and Outreach

Each year, VIP’s robust Communications and Outreach Program reaches over 10,000 people in our target communities at community fairs, churches, schools, health care facilities, special events and through local businesses. In Fiscal Year 2019, we reached 10,366 individuals through community outreach efforts, participated in 375 outreach activities, and gave out 38,690 outreach materials. We also participate in grassroots and neighborhood-based events across the city to increase visibility about resources for victims of domestic and sexual violence. In addition, the Communications and Outreach team connects the hidden population of immigrant survivors to needed resources, provides youth prevention education workshops that center the experience of immigrant youth, and mobilizes a community of survivor-activists based on the Promotora model of peer outreach and education popular throughout Latin America.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

VIP's 24-hour live-operated bilingual hotline provide an array of services, including over-the-phone crisis counseling, safety planning, emergency shelter information, and referrals to housing and other community-based social service providers as needed.

Our cultural and bilingual capability eliminates barriers, allowing for greater reach and impact as well as the continued support of the Latin@ community, and of all other communities requiring intimate partner and domestic violence services.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

Our emergency shelter, Morivivi, is an option for survivors as they move forward establishing violence-free lives. Families are housed in scattered site apartment for up to 180 days and receive a range of services including individual and group counseling, advocacy, and case management.

Residents of our shelter programs are encouraged to build a sense of community and belonging. They have access to all of our non-residential services during and after their time in shelter. We work with clients to provide economic education and long term management skills that allow them to secure permanent housing, understand their housing rights, maintain a budget, and navigate the tenant-landlord relationship.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

At Casa Sandra we provide eligible families coming out of domestic violence shelters up to two years of transitional/supportive housing. Clients are referred via New York City’s network of emergency domestic violence shelter or other community-based organizations.

Residents of our shelter programs are encouraged to build a sense of community and belonging. They have access to all of our non-residential services during and after their time in shelter. We work with clients to provide economic education and long term management skills that allow them to secure permanent housing, understand their housing rights, maintain a budget, and navigate the tenant-landlord relationship.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

VIP's three community-based programs provide crisis counseling and safety planning, intensive case management, individual and group therapeutic counseling, accompaniment to criminal and civil legal court dates, as well as advocacy to obtain and maintain public benefits, file orders of protection, apply for crime victim assistance funds. We also provide long-term management skills training that empowers survivors to secure permanent housing, understand their housing rights and navigate the tenant-landlord relationship.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

Recognizing that economic security is central to continued self-determination for survivors, VIP is heavily invested in developing models for economic security that are inclusive of all survivors, regardless of immigration status. Our Economic Justice Program not only helps survivors develop essential financial literacy skills but also, through our ArteSanando initiative, supports survivors in developing their own small businesses. In addition, VIP launched New York City's first worker co-operative business exclusively owned and operated by 18 immigrant survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded by grassroots activists in East Harlem in 1984, VIP’s mission is to lead Latinx victims of domestic violence to safety, empower them to live free of violence and reach and sustain their full potential. Our culturally specific, three-pronged approach to ending domestic violence is unique among the City’s domestic violence organizations. VIP’s overarching goals include providing:
• holistic, survivor-informed and evidenced-based direct services to support those in immediate need;
• community outreach and education to raise awareness and deepen understanding about the dynamics of abusive relationships, and address root causes
• survivor-led community organizing to make a positive and transformative impact on Latinx communities.

With five locations in New York City, VIP’s programs are community-driven and located in low-income, heavily Latinx immigrant communities in East Harlem, Queens, and the Bronx. VIP is deeply rooted in the communities it serves and a highly trusted resource.

VIP provides a holistic spectrum of life-saving and transformative services including emergency shelter and homelessness prevention, crisis management, culturally affirming mental health services to help families heal from trauma, and innovative programs to help survivors achieve long-term economic stability. VIP’s community engagement team raises awareness and reaches 10,000+ people annually by mobilizing a cohort of Latinx survivors and community organizers called Promotoras, who serve as trusted and effective messengers about VIP’s services. As prior VIP clients, Promotoras use their own survival stories to reach the hidden population of immigrants who may never otherwise access help to end D/SV. Central to VIP’s strategy since the days of our founding, is uplifting Latinx survivors in its staff and leadership, including on VIP’s board of directors. With powerful ties within the communities VIP is located and serves, VIP’s leadership reflects our target population at every level.

As the only organization in New York City providing culturally-specific support and advocacy to Latinx survivors of domestic and sexual violence, VIP not only fulfills a unique need that no one else does, it is uniquely qualified to do so. As a Culturally Specific Organization:

• VIP is integrated with the communities we serve. The vast majority of VIP staff + leadership are survivors of gender-based violence, 1st, 2nd or 3rd generation Latinx immigrants, LGBTQ, and/or Spanish-speaking.

• VIP understands and is deeply trusted by our target population. Our reputation and credibility within marginalized immigrant communities is a critical bridge for survivors seeking access to trusted and culturally relevant services.

• VIP’s approach to meeting the needs of our community is holistic, trauma-informed, and survivor-centered.

• VIP plays a vital role in advancing racial equity in New York City and beyond, the importance of which cannot be overstated in an era of profound, persisting racial inequities.


VIP was established by Latinx and Black survivors of domestic violence who did not see themselves reflected in the staff at traditional domestic violence organizations in NYC. Available services lacked cultural and linguistic relevance to their experiences. Since then, nearly four decades ago, VIP has grown alongside the changing and expanding landscape of Latinx communities in New York City, and our staff and leadership continue to embody the rich racial and ethnic diversity of the communities we serve.

VIP is proud to be an organization that fosters leadership among Latinx communities, especially women, and where our staff experience an upwardly mobile professional path. VIP’s continued commitment to fostering leadership among people of color has been successful in yielding a diverse and dynamic leadership staff.

In addition to its diversity, VIP’s management team is skilled at leading through the adversity of the anti-immigrant and anti-Latinx political climate, works together to address trauma and crisis, and continually cohere a powerful message of unity, efficiency, and integrity.

Founded in East Harlem in 1984 by Black and Latina grassroots activists, Violence Intervention Program (VIP) New York City’s only culturally specific organization dedicated to addressing domestic and sexual violence (D/SV) against Latinx survivors.

Today, VIP has more than 60 staff members and 5 locations in heavily-Latinx neighborhoods in East Harlem, Queens and the Bronx. Each year, VIP provides direct services to 4,000+ survivors and their children, answers more than 5000 phone calls via VIP’s live, bilingual 24/7 domestic violence hotline, and reaches more than 12,000 community members via our community outreach and education programs. Last year, VIP:

• Provided safe housing in our Emergency Shelter for 200+ survivors and children
• Provided 1025 survivors with 4600 counseling sessions
• Over 500 survivors found healing and support in 100+ group counseling sessions
• Granted micro-grants to 15 survivors to support the growth of their small businesses
• Engaged 1,200+ NYC teens in intimate partner violence workshops to increase awareness and prevent domestic and sexual violence
• Reached over 17,000 New Yorkers with our educational, awareness-building materials.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Violence Intervention Program, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Violence Intervention Program, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Betsy Mallow

NYS Homes and Community Renewal

Term: 2015 -

Milga Morales

Brooklyn College

Susan Migliaccio

Consultant

Mayra Oviedo

Consultant

Erika Soto Lamb

Comedy Central

Manuel J. Velez

Mayer Brown LLP

Linda Aristondo, Esq.

RDJ Refugee Shelter

Vanessa Ramos, Esq.

NYC Commission on Human Rights

Veronica Rodriguez

Vanessa Santiago

Girls, Inc

Linda Schechter Manley

NYS Division of Homes and Community Renewal

Julie Sandoval

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/13/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.