Asian American Federation Inc

Raising the influence and wellbeing of the pan-Asian community in NYC

NEW YORK, NY   |  www.aafederation.org

Mission

Established in 1989, the Asian American Federation's (AAF) mission is to raise the influence and well-being of the pan-Asian American community through research, policy advocacy, public awareness, and organizational development. We are a New York city based nonprofit leadership organization that represents and supports a network of 70 nonprofits which serve low-/moderate-income households through programs in health & human services, education, economic development, civic participation, and social justice.

Ruling year info

1991

Executive Director

Ms. JoAnn Yoo

Main address

120 WALL STREET 9TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3572287

NTEE code info

Community Coalitions (S21)

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Y01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Asian Americans are 16% of New York city’s population, and the fastest-growing ethnic group. Yet, they continue to encounter significant obstacles to their wellbeing and success. • 70% are immigrants. • 25 % live in poverty and that number grew by 44% from 2000 to 2016 • Poverty rates are higher for Asian immigrants, as 1 in 4 Asian immigrants arrived in the United States less than 10 years ago. • Of immigrants in poverty, 70% of Asian immigrants have limited English proficiency, with Chinese and Korean seniors having almost 90% limited English proficiency • The poverty rate for Asian seniors went up from 23.5% in 2000 to 24.8% in 2016. • Asian child poverty rates increased from 2000-2016 by 1.4%. • Mental health issues are particularly acute in the community. In NYC, Asian Americans are the only racial group for which suicide was one of the top 10 causes of death from 1997-2015.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Small Business Revitalization Program

AAF works with 100+ Asian small business along the Union Street corridor in Flushing, New York, to help them promote their businesses through marketing campaigns, beautification projects and technical assistance training. Our goal is to re-establish the historic Union Street district as a shopping destination and build capacity for small business support for the Asian community.

Population(s) Served
People of Asian descent
Immigrants and migrants

Mental health issues are particularly acute in the Asian American community. In New York City, Asian Americans are the only racial group for which suicide was one of the top 10 causes of death from 1997 to 2015. In New York State, suicide is the second leading cause of death for Asian Americans ages 15 to 24 and the third leading cause for those ages 10 to 14 and 25 to 34. We have been using the findings in our 2017 original policy report "Overcoming Challenges to Mental Health Services for Asian New Yorkers", to advocate for greater investment in mental health and education that is tailored to the languages and cultures of the pan-Asian community. In order to avert what is quickly becoming a public health concern, AAF is determined to build the capacity for linguistically and culturally competent mental health services for Asian communities. We expect our project will build the related capacity of 15-20 organizations; train 75-100 staff; and assist over 5,000 clients.

Population(s) Served
People of Asian descent
Immigrants and migrants

One of AAF’s core program areas is to provide technical assistance to Asian-serving, Asian-led organizations to help them build their capacity. Our Strengthening Nonprofit Leaders Program for executive directors and Leaders in Training Program for senior directors develops their leadership skills and builds a community of practice among nonprofit leaders to share resources with one another.

Population(s) Served
People of Asian descent
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Estimated number of funding dollars secured for the sector

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meetings or briefings held with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Improving Access to Mental Health for Asian Americans

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded in 1989, the Asian American Federation (AAF) is one of the strongest leadership voices advocating for better policies, services, and funding that lead to more justice and opportunity for Asian immigrants, one of NYC’s poorest and most underserved communities. AAF aims to overcome the significant obstacles that the Asian-American community faces in New York by empowering a network of over 70 pan-Asian nonprofits to better serve their communities through advocacy, policy transformation, economic empowerment, better mental health care, and safety against anti-Asian racism and violence. Our leadership role helps give a collective voice to the more than 20 national groups—diverse in language, culture, and religion—that make up New York’s Asian community. We use our research to gather and make the data about our community visible and organize members and advocate with city and state elected officials, corporations, and the media on behalf of the community’s needs. In addition, our goal is to ensure that Asian American voices are included in public policy discussions about immigrant rights, mental health, anti-Asian racism, and community safety, and economic development. We have extensive experience securing, managing, and regranting funding to support initiatives that lead to equity and justice for marginalized communities. We work to support our 70 member organizations as they bring these programs to scale in order to strengthen the well-being of our community.

An example of our work is our Hope Against Hate campaign which was launched in response to the anti-Asian hate that was unleashed against Asian communities during the Covid-19 pandemic. Nationally, from March 2020 to December 2021, there were 10,905 reports of anti-Asian incidents, according to Stop AAPI Hate. During that same period, in New York City, there were 2,736 reported incidents and 3, 215 incidents in New York State since March 2020. The NYPD, in particular, reported more anti-Asian hate crimes during the first quarter of 2021 than in all of 2020, making the city home to the greatest number of assaults in the nation. The year-to-year growth (Oct. 2019 to Sept. 2021) was 384% for anti-Asian hate crimes reported to the NYPD. Hate crimes research in the Asian community indicates that fewer than 10-30% of actual cases are reported, suggesting the true number of assaults, verbal and physical, is likely many times more. In response, AAF under it's Hope Against Hate campaign umbrella coordinated a multi-pronged strategy to address anti-Asian violence through media communications, community education, safety training, victim support, and elected official engagement. From safety training and information sessions attended by thousands of community members, to rallies and vigils attended by thousands of New Yorkers, AAF is building the infrastructure for a community-informed, community-centered safety plan to tackle this crisis.

AAF’s mission is to raise the influence and well-being of the pan-Asian American community through research, policy advocacy, public awareness, and organizational development.

● Research: Our reports provide hard data and highlight issues (mental health, poverty, economic opportunity) affecting the Asian American community and provide policy recommendations to address challenges.
● Advocacy: We convene policy-focused meetings with the aim of explaining our findings and recommendations to elected officials and funding agencies.
● Program Design: We also use our research to design direct services programs that address new or underserved needs. We raise money for these programs and re-grant funds to member organizations who help us implement programs.
● Technical Assistance: We provide ongoing training, capacity building, and mentorship activities to organizations in our network, enabling them to implement best practices in nonprofit management that allow them to thrive.

As a non-profit that has been working for Asian New Yorkers for the last 33 years, the Asian American Federation (AAF) has deep experience in leading the charge on important civil rights, social justice and equity issues impacting our community. As a statewide intermediary and coordinating entity, AAF has established relationships with relevant state and city agencies, training consultants, and thought leaders that allow us to roll out programs and bring them to scale across our 70+ member network. In short, our ability to connect community-based organizations with resources to improve service delivery offers far greater impact than any one of our member organizations could have on its own.



AAF’s key accomplishments include:

- Since 1989, AAF has raised more than $15 million to re-grant to Asian nonprofits, empowered nearly 70 small CBOs that serve vulnerable populations , and transformed the lives of tens of thousands of Asian Americans a year.
- Since 2002, AAF has created over 20 original policy documents/research reports on Asian American issues, such as poverty, mental health, economic impact, and social service needs, which have been instrumental in driving policy changes at the city and state levels.
In recent history, AAF’s efforts to advocate for policies that advance marginalized communities have resulted in:
- Robust research and advocacy efforts to highlight the increasingly visible mental health needs of Asian Americans in NYC and to secure resources to build capacity for linguistically and culturally competent mental health programs;
- Leading a citywide consortium to improve mental health services and serve 8,000 Asian New Yorkers to date;
- Since January 2020, leading efforts to address the surge in anti-Asian violence by setting up a reporting tool in Asian languages, providing safety trainings, and distributing safety booklets and videos created in multiple languages to 55,000+ Asians across NY and the nation.
- Raising over 3 million dollars for the community to fight anti-Asian hate through community-led, community-focused safety measures.
- Highlighting the community’s needs through 20+ original policy briefs and research reports, including the first-ever report on the mental health needs of the community. This data has been instrumental in driving policy changes at the city and state levels;
- Establishing the Communities of Color Nonprofit Stabilization Fund to regrant $15 million in city funding to build the capacity of 500 nonprofits;
- Securing the first funding from NYS to provide, through regrants, immigration legal services to 8,000 + immigrants;
- Supporting 100 Asian small businesses through a $3 million NYC grant, including changing an archaic signage law that benefited all small businesses in NYC;
- Working with Latinx and African immigrant groups to increase the required languages offered by NYS and NYC government agencies from 6 to 10.
- Training nearly 70 pan-Asian nonprofit member and partner agencies to fundraise, advocate, and use communications tools more effectively; build leadership capacity at the board, executive, and senior leadership levels; build coalitions to develop resources for the pan-Asian American community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Asian American Federation Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Asian American Federation Inc

Board of directors
as of 05/23/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Majorie Hsu

Formerely Vice President, Network Administration, Verizon Wireless

Muzzafar Chisti

Migration Policy Institute

Stella Aquino

Empire BlueCross BlueShield

Kim Lee

Global Atlantic Financial Group

Chris Kwok

JAMS

Emily Mathews

Blackstone

Jean Siao

Regeneron

Marie Silloway

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability