Hispanic Federation Inc.

Taking Hispanic Causes to Heart

New York, NY   |  www.hispanicfederation.org

Mission

The Hispanic Federation (HF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit federation that works in tandem with 400+ Latino community-based organizations (CBOs) on its mission to empower and advance the Hispanic community. From its New York City Headquarters to offices in Connecticut, Washington, D.C., North Carolina, Florida, and Puerto Rico, HF works to uplift millions of Hispanic children, youth, and families locally and nationally through building the capacity of Latino nonprofits, public policy advocacy, and a portfolio of innovative community programs.

Notes from the nonprofit

Below are just some highlights of what the Hispanic Federation was able to accomplish in 2020: • Expanded HF's influence to 40 states in the areas of health, immigration, environment • Grew our operations to educate, register and mobilize 3.5million Latino voters during the general elections, helping Latinos play a critical role in swing states such as Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Georgia, and Florida. • Provided 215,382 children and families with direct educational, immigration, financial, health, and other services. • In 2020, we served a community of 800 students across eight colleges in four states, including New York, Florida, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Ruling year info

1991

President

Mr. Frankie Miranda

Main address

55 Exchange Place 5th FL Suite 501

New York, NY 10005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3573852

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Voter Education/Registration (R40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hispanic Federation (HF) seeks to support Latino families and strengthen Latino institutions through work in the areas of education, health, immigration, civic engagement, disaster relief, economic empowerment, philanthropy and the environment. HF uplifts Latino families locally and nationally through three essential service pillars: membership services/grant making, advocacy and community programs. What we aim to solve: Hispanic Federation aims to address the issues that affect Latino communities including health and education access, underemployment, immigration, economic empowerment and civic engagement, among others. Its goal is to give a voice to Latino causes across the United States and in Puerto Rico.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Technical Assistance Programs

Since the launch of our Entre Familia Institute five years ago, HF has convened and provided professional development training and learnings to 11,644 Latino nonprofit leaders. Training include crisis management, working remotely, virtual advocacy, managing finances, housing, unemployment, how to apply for a federal PPP loan, hosting virtual fundraising events, which were among the topics covered.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Families
Children and youth

Hispanic Federation launched a Covid-19 Emergency Assistance Fund in March 2020 to support Latino communities throughout the nation, and the institutions that serve them locally. With a focus on helping the most vulnerable and impacted segments of our community - seniors, children and families living in poverty, undocumented immigrants, farmworkers, day laborers, people without health insurance, and migrant families and refugees - the Hispanic Federation committed over $20 million across 40 states & Puerto Rico to over 1,000 nonprofits and small businesses.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Children and youth
Immigrants and migrants

In response to the immense devastation caused by Hurricane Maria in September 2017, Hispanic Federation (HF) convened government, community and philanthropic institutions and leaders to create the UNIDOS Disaster Relief and Recovery Program. In 2020, Puerto Rico faced a new series of unexpected emergencies that required a large-scale, full community response. From providing Covid-19 assistance to supporting agricultural and renewable energy projects, HF helped lead humanitarian efforts across the island. We scaled our relief and recovery aid through grants, cash assistance, and direct goods. HF awarded $4.55M to 92 organizations on the island. Distributed 1.8 million coffee seedlings to 1050 farmers to help them revive their coffee harvests. Completed the installation of over 2,000 solar panels. We have ensured health access for more than 100,000, low-income people with a combined energy cost savings of more than $24,000 a month across four energy plants.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

Advocacy services focus on advancing the interests and aspirations of Latinos and their community-based organizations through, among other things, coalition building, policy research, public education, advocacy, and voter mobilization. In 2020, much of Hispanic Federation's advocacy work focused on the U.S. Census participation & voter mobilization. Over 750,000 total calls and messages were sent out to Latinos across the nation to make sure they were counted in the 2020 census. Also, 3.5 million Latino voters were engaged in multiple states and 91% of our targets who requested an absentee ballot voted before Election Day.

Population(s) Served
People of Latin American descent
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Families
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Technical Assistance Programs

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Assistance Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Meals provided to vulnerable individuals and families impacted by the pandemic.

Number of people received immigration service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Assistance Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Immigrants received citizenship assistance, ESL, civics classes, legal defense and Know Your Rights trainings.

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

UNIDOS Disaster Relief and Recovery Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Coffee seedlings distributed to 572 farmers in 41 municipalities to help them revive the coffee harvests in Puerto Rico.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Technical Assistance Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Latino nonprofit leaders were provided professional development training through 42 online webinars in 2020.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, Families, Health, Sexual identity

Related Program

Community Assistance Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HF’s overarching goal is to strengthen Latino children, youth, families, and whole communities and create a sustainable Latino nonprofit sector by developing grass root and grass top coalitions involving community-based organizations (CBOs), foundations, corporations, individuals, government, and media partners. HF will use these coalitions to create advocacy and service programs that aim to improve Latino outcomes in the areas of education, health, immigration, civic engagement, disaster relief, economic empowerment, philanthropy, and the environment.

Goal 1: Alleviate Poverty and Help Latino Families Thrive. Hispanic Federation (HF) promotes the social, political, and economic well-being of the Latino community through scaling direct service programs on a regional and national level. HF community assistance supports and uplifts children, youth, and families through the provision of direct social services in the areas of K-12 education, college access and success, workforce training, citizenship and naturalization, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), General Education Diploma (GED) and Adult Basic Education (ABE) classes, financial literacy, hunger relief, and health. Through these programs, HF is committed to decreasing disparities and advancing equity.

Goal 2: Create a Sustainable Latino Nonprofit Sector to Support Latino Families: Hispanic Federation is committed to reinvigorating Latino grassroots institutions that are the mainstays of Latino life: early childhood centers, immigration service providers, arts groups, community-health clinics, shelters, after-school hubs, workforce centers, civil rights agencies, and others. HF works every day with these nonprofits to advance policies and create programming that touch the lives of people, families, and communities we collectively serve. And we provide community-based organizations with organizational development assistance and capacity-building grants that allow them to strengthen their programs and operations to serve our community more efficiently and effectively.

Goal 3: Shape a Shared Advocacy Agenda to Strengthen Latino Communities: Hispanic Federation’s federal and state advocacy efforts advance the interests and generates resources for Latinos and allies through coalition-building, convening cross-sector institutions, and public education campaigns, winning tens of millions of dollars for people of color-run nonprofits in locations, such as New York City, Connecticut, Florida, and Puerto Rico.

The Hispanic Federation exists to empower and advance the Latino community, support Latino families, and strengthen Latino institutions. To achieve its mission, the Federation works at local, state, regional, and national levels and employs four key strategies:

Grantmaking: In 2020, HF provided a record $19.25 million to strengthen Latino communities nationwide, providing essential support to 350 nonprofit organizations, 798 small businesses, and more than 1,000 households.

Organizational development: Since the launch of our Entre Familia Institute five years ago, HF has convened and provided professional development training and learnings to 11,644 Latino nonprofit leaders.

Community assistance: HF programs and services that provide new opportunities for children, youth, and families, and bring to scale a portfolio of innovative community initiatives.

Public education and advocacy: HF promotes public policies that enhance life opportunities for Latinos.

The Hispanic Federation works with 350+ Latino nonprofit member organizations and a broader network of nonprofits that partner with us to deliver programs in 25+ states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. United Way has described the Hispanic Federation as "a model for other communities in their efforts to build the capacity of their organizations."

Headquartered in New York, the Federation has field offices in Connecticut, Florida, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, and Washington, DC, and is opening offices in Pennsylvania and Illinois. These offices work locally, statewide, and regionally.

The Hispanic Federation ecosystem of the board, staff, member agencies, and partners have a single-minded determination to better the lives of our Latino communities, nonprofits, and families. There is no Latino organization—indeed, no one organization in general—that combines a near-perfect mix of grassroots base-building with national reach, long-term strategic thinking with unparalleled on-the-ground responsiveness, and solo organizational effectiveness with success in creating impactful allyships. Because of the Hispanic Federation, many Latino communities have dramatically changed for the better.

One year can change everything. 2020 ushered in unimaginable loss and suffering across our nation and globe with the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. A swarm of earthquakes that struck Puerto Rico in January and two devastating hurricanes that hit Central America in November provided telling bookends to what has been the most challenging of years. While 2020 tested us as never before, it also showed what we’re made of. Thanks to the indomitable commitment to service our network of nonprofit institutions, board, staff, and donors, the Hispanic Federation (HF) led extraordinary actions to provide support, care, sustenance, and hope to hundreds of thousands of vulnerable households. Much like we did with our emergency earthquake operations in Puerto Rico, HF created the most far-reaching Latino Covid-19 relief effort in the nation partnering with over 400 community nonprofits to respond to urgent calls for help from New York to California, from Florida to Oregon. To make these efforts possible, we invested over $20 million and massively scaled up our humanitarian assistance in 40 states and Puerto Rico.

Crisis necessitates change. The need to launch virtual services accelerated HF’s system modernization, enabling us to reach and engage the communities of people we care for and serve via online workshops and webinars, a phone-to-action system, and many virtual platforms. We were able to pair this new technology with our on-the-ground efforts to reach and encourage 7 million Latinos to participate in the U.S. Census. We also grew our operations to educate, register, and mobilize 3.5 million Latino voters during the general elections, helping Latinos play a critical role in swing states such as Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Georgia, and Florida.

HF also provided 215,382 children and families with direct educational, immigration, financial, health, and other services. In short, we expanded our essential work to meet this moment. Our eyes are now squarely on 2021 as we gear up for an unprecedented mobilization to defeat COVID-19, defend and uplift our shared values, and effect lasting change that strengthens communities, in every part of our nation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Focus on helping the most vulnerable and impacted segments of our community - seniors, children and families living in poverty, undocumented immigrants, farmworkers, people without health insurance, and migrant families and refugees.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Hispanic Federation Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hispanic Federation Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Manuel Chinea

Popular Bank

Term: 2022 - 2019

Nathalie Rayes

Latino Victory

Miguel Centeno

Healthfirst

Manuel Chinea

Popular Community Bank

Margaret Lazo

Univision Communications Inc

Dean Aguillen

Ogilvy

Indrani Franchini

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Frank Sanchez

Rhode Island College

Carlos Santiago

Santiago Solutions Group

Inez Stewart

Johns Hopkins Health System

Marcos Torres

RBC Capital Markets LLC

Juan Otero

Comcast/NBCUniversal/Telemundo

Joan Steinberg

Morgan Stanley

Hector Mujica

Google.org

Yrthya Dinzey-Flores

WarnerMedia

Frankie Miranda

Hispanic Federation

Jessica Herrera-Flanigan

Twitter

Julie Crommett

Disney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability