Arts, Culture, and Humanities

Education Through Music

aka ETM

New York, NY

Mission

Education Through Music (ETM) partners with under-resourced schools to provide music as a core subject for all children, and utilizes music education as a catalyst to improve achievement, motivation for school, and self-confidence. Education Through Music believes: *Every child deserves access to high-quality music education, taught by qualified and well-trained music teachers. *Music should support learning in other key areas, including math, science and language arts. *Engaged parents and school communities are key to the success of students.

Ruling Year

1991

Executive Director

Ms. Penny Swift

Main Address

122 E 42nd St Ste 1501

New York, NY 10168 USA

Keywords

arts, music, education, school, reform, instruction, children, teacher, artist, training, professional development

EIN

13-3613210

 Number

1086619699

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Blog

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Education policy at the national and state levels reflects multiple learning and social benefits of music education: the Every Student Succeeds act of 2015 recognizes music as integral to a well-rounded education, and there is a New York State mandate for music education. Yet, many students lack access to music education. Especially in low-income communities, many schools have excluded music from the curriculum or rely on isolated, fragmented experiences. When schools neglect to offer music instruction, students whose families cannot afford to pursue alternate opportunities outside of school are put at a severe disadvantage. ETM targets this particularly vulnerable group by partnering with schools that serve low-income students and have either no music faculty or a number insufficient to serve all students.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

New York City Partner School Program

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of teachers trained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

New York City Partner School Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

ETM’s services to children are only as good as the music teachers who work in our partner schools classrooms day in and day out. We provide ongoing, customized training, PD, and mentoring.

Number of lessons taught

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years),

Minorities,

At-risk youth

Related program

New York City Partner School Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Partner school students attend general music class as an in-school, core subject. Additionally, students may elect to participate in choir, band or orchestra ensembles, which rehearse 1-3 times/week.

Number of children who have access to education

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

K-12 (5-19 years),

At-risk youth,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

New York City Partner School Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

ETM partners with under-resourced schools to provide all students with access to music education as part of a well-rounded education, where they previously lacked such opportunities.

Number of hours of training

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adults

Related program

New York City Partner School Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context notes

ETM provides training and professional development workshops to music teachers serving our partner school students. Workshops take place throughout the year and are supplemented by mentoring.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

In ETM’s model, all students, including those with special needs, have access to comprehensive, sequential, skills- and standards-based music instruction. We involve the full school community to build support for music as part of a well-rounded education. The ETM model aims to promote growth and achievement in: • Students’ motivation to learn and engage in school. • Students’ social-emotional development. • Music teachers’ abilities to deliver effective, meaningful instruction. • Community and school support for music programs. • Build schools’ capacity to sustain music as a core subject in the long-term. ETM's ultimate goal is for schools to directly provide music education as a core subject to every student. We seek to have more and more teachers hired to school staff so that schools are no longer dependent on ETM and ETM's funders in order to provide services to students.

To sustain music programs at the individual school level, ETM forms close, collaborative relationships with partner school principals, so that they understand and value the program. Our ultimate long-term plan for each school is that they will hire sufficient music faculty to staff to provide in-school music instruction to all students without relying on externally funded staffing. As each school builds more program expenses into its own budget, the dependence on ETM's services and funders is decreased; ETM can then serve in an advisory capacity to these schools and devote the majority of our resources to building new partnerships and reaching additional children. For each school, the transition from having no music program to building the capacity to support direct music education expenses is a long-term process. As such, ETM is committed to partnering with schools for several years and conducts ongoing fundraising to cover the costs that partner schools are not yet able to support.

ETM has over 25 years of experience working in close partnership with under-resourced schools to effect change through music education. Internal strengths include staffing expertise and sound fiscal management. Our executive and program staff members have extensive experience teaching and working in under-resourced schools. We have a dedicated evaluation team, and work hard to stay aware of successes and challenges, to adapt and improve. We pay close attention to organizational structure and finances so that we can be productive and effective in both programmatic and non-programmatic areas. External strengths include a network of partner school principals, and their supervisors at the district/network level, who aid one another in fighting to implement school-wide music education in the face of so many other demands. We continue to reach out to build new networks of supporters in order to raise awareness of the importance of music education as a core subject for all students.

Evaluation is a key part of ETM’s model, one that has allowed us to continue to adapt to the changing landscape of education and drive concrete results in the schools we serve. Through evaluation, we are able to get a clear picture of how program impact aligns with goals. ETM monitors and evaluates programs at each school on an ongoing basis. Recent assessment tools include: surveys of music teachers, classroom teachers, students, parents, and principals; attendance records; and observations of music teachers. Surveys collect feedback on areas including student development, teaching practices, and professional development services. ETM program staff evaluate music teachers using a rubric that rates achievement in areas including lesson planning, classroom management, and integration. Additionally, ETM advises music teachers on evaluating students throughout the year using indicators such as performances, homework, and portfolios. In 2017, ETM embarked on a multi-year evaluation plan, guided by an evidence-based framework, measuring dynamic and static data from students, music teachers, parents/guardians, and principals. Data are collected at multiple points in the school year. Results are shared internally to help guide program design and planning. ETM shares school-level findings with the respective partner principals, and shares aggregated reports publicly. At the organization level, the Board and staff collaborate on strategic planning and goal-setting and check in on status at least once per quarter.

External evaluation in 2005-08 found ETM supports improvements in students' music skills, test performance and general development; music teachers' abilities as educators; and teachers' abilities to collaborate to support learning. Findings from 2015 indicate students in ETM partner schools perform better academically than students in schools with similar demographics that do not have ETM. Participation in music class and performances contributed to creativity and to social and emotional capacities. The program encouraged motivation for school in general. ETM's current evaluation is considering students’ sense of competence, autonomy, and relatedness for learning and engaging in music. Education research has established these as “active ingredients” in developing internalized motivation, which has been found to predict: persistence in learning despite challenges, achievement, and spillover effects into non-musical domains such as school engagement and social-emotional development. Highlights from our recent Impact Report (released in 2019 and available at impact.etmonline.org) show that ETM is: • Expanding music education for students least likely to have access: 40% of students at first-year ETM partner schools reported that they had never had a general music class prior to the current school year, and 54% of families of students at ETM partner schools reported they have had “hardly any” opportunities to get involved with music in their life. • Sparking students’ passion for music: 83% of students across partner schools reported that they love singing or playing instruments, and 77% said they do their work in music class because they are motivated to learn new things. • Providing professional development and mentoring activities that help music teachers be effective and avoid burnout: 80% of music teachers agreed that ETM has helped them become part of a community of peer teachers, and 96% agreed that their ETM mentor was timely and responsive to their needs. • Helping build vibrant school communities: 88% of partner school principals rate ETM as “above average” or “excellent” at integrating the music program into their school culture, and 71% of music teachers agree that their school community collaborated to support their concerts.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), suggestion box/email.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, doe regulations.
What significant change resulted from feedback
In March and April 2019, ETM’s program and evaluation staff led three focus group sessions of music teachers, engaging teachers of varying experience levels to gather from them feedback and insights on training. Feedback revealed that music teachers were interested in having more time to informally network with their peers; teachers were positive about using a tiered model for classroom management and lesson planning sessions; teachers wanted more content focus on working with students with special needs; and teachers valued chances to learn from each other’s best practices. ETM incorporated teacher suggestions into training design for the summer 2019 Academy and subsequent workshops.

External Reviews

Awards

Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination Grant 2005

U.S. Department of Education

Photos

Financials

Education Through Music

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/11/2019

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data