HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL OF NEW YORK

The voice of the human services community

New York, NY   |  www.humanservicescouncil.org

Mission

HSC strengthens New York's nonprofit human services sector, ensuring all New Yorkers, across diverse neighborhoods, cultures, and generations reach their full potential.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Allison Sesso

Main address

130 E 59th Street

New York, NY 10022 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3620059

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Founded in 1991, our primary goal is to improve the lives of New Yorkers, from all walks of life and across diverse neighborhoods, cultures, and generations. We do this by strengthening New York's nonprofit human services industry, an
economic engine whose more than 200,000 employees deliver services that improve the physical, emotional, economic health and wellbeing of individuals, and help communities fight prejudice and violence, recover from disasters, and create pathways to opportunity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Government Relations and Advocacy

HSC's budget and policy unit unites the sector and brings collective problems to the attention of government officials at the State and City levels. We fight against cuts to programs and bring systemic and regulatory problems to the forefront of the political debate by shedding light on the effect these issues have on our most vulnerable citizens.

By developing and maintaining strong relationships with key policy makers, HSC protects and strengthens the investments and policies that define New York's human service delivery system.

HSC's policy team continuously monitors City and State budget and legislative processes as they relate to human services, providing in-depth budget analyses as well as information on key decision makers.

HSC's work has proven to be instrumental in maintaining funding for these vital services that so many New Yorkers depend on. Year after year, we ward off cuts to the sector and push for targeted new investments through our strong advocacy efforts. HSC also strives to ensure that legislation and regulations serve the interests of human service agencies.

Working as a liaison between government and the provider community, HSC will continue to maximize the resources dedicated to the delivery of human services by demonstrating the soundness of these public investments.

Population(s) Served

Builds a stronger human services delivery system by advocating for greater government investment in the human services workforce

Population(s) Served

Works on the continuous improvement of the business relationship between government and the nonprofit human services sector through policies that ensure meaningful collaboration in program design, appropriate funding, and contractual flexibility so that nonprofits can best serve their communities.

Population(s) Served

Responsible for helping HSC determine ways to address structural inequities, such as racism, in the human services sector as it relates to social policies, communities, and the delivery of human services.

Population(s) Served

Develops practices and policies that will help the sector to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters; build partnerships between our sector and government to improve coordination; provide guidance on mechanisms to share information, and promote HSC’s role in enhancing the sector’s emergency preparedness

Population(s) Served

Supports HSC’s ability to be more responsive and engaged with the needs of its existing members and strategizes ways to grow the size of HSC’s membership to better position it to accomplish the critical policy changes needed to strengthen the sector.

Population(s) Served

Advisory body elected by the membership to guide HSC’s policy agenda:
•Provide a broad forum for discussion of substantive issues to inform HSC’s agenda and strategy;
•Offer feedback to government on new approaches, policies, etc. being considered that cut across the sector; and
•Identify new trends and offer ideas for new approaches and suggestions of issues HSC should consider addressing

Population(s) Served

Cohort of advocates from 25 member direct service providers who play an active role in advancing the agenda of the human services sector to City and State government by participating in legislative meetings, contributing to media efforts, and assisting in public actions

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of advisory councils the organization is a part of

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Government Relations and Advocacy

Context Notes

Nonprofit Resiliency Committee, NYC Service Board Development Coalition, Hurricane Sandy Houses of Worship & Charitable Organization, Ahead of the Curve Committee

Estimated number of funding dollars secured for the sector

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Government Relations and Advocacy

Context Notes

Sustain our Sanctuary Campaign (over $380 million investments from NYC to human services), and Strong Nonprofits for a Better New York Campaign ($20 million in investments from NYS to human services).

Number of meetings with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Government Relations and Advocacy

Context Notes

Over the years, HSC's political clout has grown. HSC regularly meets with the NYC and NYS administrations as well as New York City Council members and NYS Assemblymembers and State Senators.

Number of government officials who publicly support the advocacy effort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Government Relations and Advocacy

Context Notes

Legislators from New York City and New York State often support our City and State advocacy campaigns by appearing at press conferences, rallies, and issuing letters of support.

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Context Notes

HSC's work has been featured in Crain’s, Politico, Gotham Gazette, New York Daily News, NBC 4 News, Times Union, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Newsday, and Capital Tonight.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HSC strengthens New York's nonprofit human services sector, ensuring New Yorkers from all walks of life, across diverse neighborhoods, cultures, and generations reach their full potential. HSC fosters a diverse network of human service organizations. Together, we discuss ideas and take collective action on issues that impact the entire sector and those they serve. Through advocacy and collaboration, we support member organizations and their leaders in addressing their concerns of public policy, economic trends, and the regulatory environment. The human services workforce encapsulates 200,000+ providers in subsectors including: housing access, childcare, elder care, shelters, food pantries, mental health counseling, and disaster response. As the voice of the human services community, we highlight the struggles of those we serve, and amplify the need for a strong, well invested sector.

I. Strengthening government relations and advocacy
HSC watches and analyzes government actions and raise concerns when attempts are made to reduce resources that support important programs.

II. Improving sector visibility and recognition (non-government)
HSC shifts public perception from viewing human services organizations as charities and recognize their crucial role in the public-private partnership.

III. Convening stakeholders, recruiting allies, and building coalitions
HSC brings together sector and non-sector partners to identify needs and issues, brainstorm possible solutions, and present those solutions to the groups that can implement the changes.

IV. Building the capacity of the human services sector
HSC strengthens the capacity of the sector and the sector's workers through informational, networking, and training opportunities. HSC empowers organizations themselves to advocate on behalf of their clients and themselves.

HSC receives funding and in-kind grants from foundations and our members to cover our operating expenses and programs. By bringing together sector and non-sector partners to identify collective needs and issues, HSC is able to optimally convene stakeholders, recruit allies, and build coalitions that contribute to the growing number of members in our organization. To ensure HSC's sustainability, we are constantly looking to maintain and strengthen our infrastructure.

We prioritize retaining our current funders, as well as building and cultivating relationships with foundations and other human services nonprofits. We are also always looking to pursue new growth opportunities. By maintaining and refining this strategic plan, HSC aspires to continue working toward achieving systemic change in government policies and funding for the human services sector.

HSC's past and future accomplishments aim to shift public perception from viewing human services organizations as charities and instead, recognize their crucial role in the public-private partnership that provides New Yorkers with a bridge out of poverty. That being said, HSC has been committed to protecting and enhancing the resources dedicated to the human services sector. We have successfully advocated for a number of programs and policies that directly benefit the sector, such as Cost-of-Living-Adjustments for workers and contracts, the creation of HHS Accelerator and HS Data, and a number of the reforms and suggestions in the Nonprofit Revitalization Act and NYC Lobby Law Reforms. Despite all these accomplishments, we are not done. We are currently working with government partners to improve Disaster Planning and Preparedness between our sector and our government partners.

Financials

HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL OF NEW YORK
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL OF NEW YORK

Board of directors
as of 7/2/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeremy Kohomban

The Children's Village

Term: 2016 - 2019

Louisa Chafee

UJA - Federation

Margaret Crotty

Partnership with Children

Nathaniel Fields

Urban Resource Institute

David Garza

Henry Street Settlement

Katy Gaul-Stigge

Good Will Industries of Greater NY and Northern NJ

Christina Greer

Fordham University

Mark Hoenig

Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

Karen Kasner

Thomas Krever

Hetrick-Martin Institute

Maria Lizardo

Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation

Paulette Lomonaco

Good Shepherd Services

Ronald Richter

JCCA

Gustavo Schwed

NYU Stern

Ariel Zwang

Safe Horizon

Frederick Shack

Urban Pathways

Damyn Kelly

Lutheran Social Services

Julissa Ferreras-Copeland

Dianne Morales

Phipps Neighborhoods

Mitchell Netburn

Samaritan Daytop Village

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No