PLATINUM2023

Asian American Writers Workshop Inc

New York, NY   |  http://www.aaww.org

Mission

The Asian American Writers’ Workshop is devoted to creating, publishing, developing, and disseminating creative work by Asian American and Asian Diasporic writers. Since our founding in 1991, we have worked to provide an alternative literary arts space at the intersection of migration, race, and social justice.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Jafreen Uddin

Main address

112 W 27th St Fl 6

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3677911

NTEE code info

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the past thirty years, The Asian American Writers’ Workshop (AAWW) has supported Asian American writers and their readers, and become an essential hub for community. In its expansive work, AAWW projects a radical inclusivity of both who is a writer and who is Asian. After a ten-year period of rapid growth, and a leadership transition in early 2020, it was time for the organization to think strategically about its future, its new size and responsibilities, and the possibilities of its work moving forward.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Margins - Online Magazine

The Margins is our award-winning magazine of literature, arts, and ideas, dedicated to inventing the Asian American creative culture of tomorrow. As the editorial arm of AAWW, it draws upon a commitment to social justice to imagine a vibrant, nuanced, multiracial, and transnational Asian America. The Margins is visited by an average of 3,000 people weekly, and has received over a million views since its launch in 2012.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of attendees each year to our in-person and virtual reading series in NYC.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AAWW fulfills its vision—to amplify Asian American literary culture to mobilize for a more just future—by carrying out its mission, made up of two primary goals:

(1) Cultivate a community of Asian American writers and their readers.
(2) Project a radical inclusivity of who is a writer and who is Asian.

AAWW uses four main strategies to reach its goals of cultivating and supporting a community of Asian American writers and their readers and projecting a radical inclusivity of who is a writer and who is Asian.

(1) Reimagine cultural representation
(2) Champion social justice movements
(3) Shape the literary field
(4) Work at global & local scales

The AAWW is the nation's preeminent organization in amplifying marginalized voices. We are a publisher, an incubator for emerging writers, a sanctuary space for readers and ideas. We are a community of activists who use our artistry to advocate for and center the voices and ideas on the margins. Our public space is designed for gathering communities and building critical dialogue between literature and movement culture.

FELLOWSHIPS

In January 2020, we welcomed a new cohort of five Open City Fellows, who have begun their nine-month fellowship writing on Asian and Muslim immigrant communities across NYC. We also welcomed a new cohort of four Margins Fellows who are at work on book-length works of fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction. Fellows' projects include a family history that also investigates conflicts over land and sovereignty in Martha's Vineyard; a collection of “reversible poems,” drawing on the centuries-old tradition in Chinese poetry to examine the circularity of melancholy and migration; a novel that explores the meeting points of immigration, political ambition, love, and violence; and a project that chronicles on writer's journey as a survivor of abuse, a teen parent, a witness testifying for a criminal trial, and an inpatient in psychiatric units.

MAGAZINE

Our online magazine The Margins was awarded a 2019 Whiting Foundation Literary Magazine Prize, which recognizes literary magazines that publish extraordinary writing with verve and flair, support talented writers on the page and in the world, connect with readers, and advance the literary community. The judges' citation for the award reads: “An indispensable incubator for audacious intellect and human complexity, The Margins reshapes literature even as it creates space for nuance, voice, imagination, and connection. As an institution, it has a profound impact on our cultural consciousness: the legion of writers The Margins has nurtured redefines our understanding of what it is to be Asian American in this country, and in the world.”

Since July 2019, we have published 145 pieces on The Margins, including essays by Adiba Talukder, Julia Shiota, Julian Saporiti, and Nina Sharma; interviews with Ishmael Reed, Monique Truong, E.J. Koh, and Poupeh Missaghi; poems by Khaty Xiong, Jess Rizkallah, Michael Prior, and Sham-e-Ali Nayeem; fiction by Bishakh Som and Ji Hyun Joo; and more.

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

From July 2019 through February 2020, we hosted 27 live events in our performance space in New York City, including five editions of our open mic Mouth to Mouth series. In March 2020, we made the difficult decision to cancel all live programming and close our public space indefinitely in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since then, we have shifted to a more robust slate of digital programming and virtual readings.

Financials

Asian American Writers Workshop Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Asian American Writers Workshop Inc

Board of directors
as of 07/28/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Anne Ishii


Board co-chair

Jin Auh

Manan Ahmed

Mariko Gordon

Hua Hsu

Kirby Kim

Jennifer 8. Lee

Matt Paco

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/28/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.