Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

Clubhouse International

Creating Community: Changing the World of Mental Health

aka Clubhouse International is a d/b/a of International Center for Clubhouse Development   |   New York, NY   |  www.clubhouse-intl.org

Mission

Clubhouse International is dedicated to ending social and economic isolation for people with mental illness by growing the number and quality of Clubhouse programs worldwide. We envision a world with people with mental illness recover and are an integral part of society.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Mr. Joel D. Corcoran MEd

Chief Operating Officer

Mr. Jack Yatsko MSW

Main address

747 Third Ave., 2nd Floor

New York, NY 10017 USA

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Formerly known as

International Center for Clubhouse Development

EIN

13-3778633

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Mental Health Association, Multipurpose (F80)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One in four adults worldwide will experience a mental illness at some point in their life. Four of the top ten leading causes of disability worldwide are neuropsychiatric disorders, representing 23% of all years lost - more than cancer and HIV combined. And by 2020, mental illness will be the leading cause of disability worldwide. Yet, people with serious and persistent mental illness are isolated, stigmatized and marginalized in virtually every country on earth. But not where there is a Clubhouse. At a Clubhouse, members come together in community to find hope, opportunity and recovery. Organized around the concept of a work-ordered day, Clubhouses provide meaningful interaction, purpose and connection to people with serious mental illness. Nearly 100,000 people with serious mental illness access Clubhouse services every year, at 297 Clubhouses in 32 countries on six continents.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clubhouse Accreditation

Accreditation is the essential cornerstone of Clubhouse International. It is a formal accreditation process for Clubhouse Model programs interested in quality improvement and demonstrating a commitment to excellence in recovery oriented services for people living with mental illness. An objective peer review process, Accreditation visits are conducted on-site by an expansive group of volunteer colleagues - staff and members from the most successful Clubhouses. Clubhouse International staff time includes managing the process, data collection and reporting. Budgeted costs include staff time, travel and faculty training.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Another cornerstone of our efforts, New Clubhouse Development expands the Clubhouse network around the globe. In addition to ongoing virtual mentoring and support provided by Clubhouse International staff, we offer New Clubhouse Development Workshops, which are two-day programs for groups interested in learning how to start and support an Accredited Clubhouse program in their local community. In 2018, Clubhouse International staff worked with 50 start-up groups in 18 countries. Budgeted costs include staff time and travel for New Clubhouse Development training.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$0

There is an alarming paucity of effective programs and strategies that address the needs of people living with mental illness in low income/developing countries. The four primary reasons for this are the prevalence of other health-related priorities (infectious diseases, nutrition, HIV/AIDs etc.); cultural and economic stigma against those with mental illness; lack of adequate funding by government and private care facilities; and the shortage of skilled health care providers Globally, the lifespan of people with severe mental disorders is shorter compared to the general population, but the degree to which this is true is much greater in the poorest countries. For people in developing countries, who lack social, professional and economic support systems for their emotional and mental needs, mental illness is usually not diagnosed or dealt with, making quality of life decrease drastically. Clubhouse International seeks to expand opportunities for healthcare professionals, government representatives, community leaders and other champions from select low income countries to participate in Clubhouse training so that they can learn the best practices as applied in more than 30 countries and adapt these proven methodologies to their unique situation.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$0

Clubhouse International and its Clubhouses have been extremely successful in helping members return to paid employment in integrated work settings through both Transitional Employment and Supported Employment programs. At U.S. Clubhouses, virtually all members are low-income, or "no income" when they arrive, so Clubhouses foster relationships with potential employers near the Clubhouse to facilitate employment opportunities for members. In this critical work, Clubhouses serves as a broker between the various companies and our members who seek opportunities to be re-integrated into the work force. This model has been successful in large part because of the trust developed in the Clubhouse staff by both members and employers. The model has also proven successful outside the U.S., where supported employer relationships enhance the likelihood of member success. Budgeted costs include program quality assurance and training delivery.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$0

People living with serious and persistent mental illness, particularly in countries where healthcare is not nationalized, are not accessing primary healthcare to the same degree as the general population. The co-occurrence of serious health concerns and premature death is at an alarmingly higher and disproportionate rate to those without mental illness. The lifespan of people with severe mental disorders is shorter compared to the general population. Although the majority of Clubhouse members have some kind of insurance or entitlements that technically allow them access to healthcare, our studies demonstrate that there remain many challenges related to utilization and compliance. It is often difficult for members to set up, get to, or keep appointments. Additionally, barriers like stigma and discrimination from providers and other patients, poverty, lack of transportation, poor wellness education, fear, and lack of assistance from concerned friends or family often prevent members from getting early intervention. From those previous surveys and information sharing with members we have identified a number of specific obstacles to better health for members. In response, we have developed a Wellness program to help Clubhouses work with local healthcare providers in priority regions and recommend strategies for engaging and relationship building. We also educate national healthcare provider associations about Clubhouses and how we can help them with our members. We are currently seeking funding to develop a comprehensive Wellness Toolkit to roll out across the Clubhouse network.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$0

Data collection and objective verification of the efficacy of the Clubhouse model is essential to the ongoing success of Clubhouses everywhere. The Program for Clubhouse Research (PCR) is an affiliation between the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) and Clubhouse International. The Program for Clubhouse Research coordinates, promotes, and conducts Clubhouse research projects that are congruent with Clubhouse philosophy. In addition, it evaluates the effectiveness of Clubhouses and/or describes the services that Clubhouses provide for their members. The Program for Clubhouse Research also acts as a clearinghouse for Clubhouse research with the capacity to provide effective communication, dissemination of information and assistance to Clubhouses and researchers considering participation in Clubhouse research projects.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$0

Where we work

Awards

Hilton Humanitarian Prize Laureate 2014

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Total Member Clubhouses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric is the total number of local Clubhouses who belong to the network of Clubhouse International. To be a member, they must abide by our International Standards for Clubhouse Programs(TM).

Percentage of Member Clubhouses that are Accredited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric represents the PERCENTAGE of the total Clubhouse membership that have achieved Accreditation, a rigorous peer-led process to ensure quality.

Number of Groups Trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric indicates the number of Clubhouse groups from the around the world who accessed a training program of some kind.

Total Training Hours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019 is the first year we have calculated the total number of hours of training provided in the Clubhouse network.

New Member Clubhouses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric indicates the number of new Clubhouses that are opened in communities around the world.

Number of Individuals Trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

We envision a world where people with mental illness recover and are an integral part of society. That vision will require a Clubhouse in every community, dedicated private and public funding, and most critically, ending the social and economic stigma and isolation experienced by people with mental illness.

Our strategic priorities fall into five mission-critical categories: Expansion: accelerate the growth of Clubhouses so that more people with mental illness in more communities around the world can find and receive the help and support they so desperately need. Quality: through Training and Accreditation, ensure the continued consistency and quality of the Clubhouse experience for members, no matter where they are. Public Awareness: be a leading voice helping to end the stigma surrounding mental illness, and promote the cause of Clubhouse around the world. Government Advocacy: promote public support and funding for the Clubhouse model around the world, and for mental health services in general. Fundraising: Increase our fundraising capacity to make all other strategic priorities possible.

Clubhouse International carries out its mission using a small paid staff and approximately 250 volunteers from member Clubhouses and interested mental health advocates across the world. Our work is accomplished through a coordinated set of Working Groups as described below. All of the Working Groups are comprised of colleagues - members and staff from member Clubhouses - whose time is given pro-bono by their organization in support of our mission and work. Working Groups: Board of Directors: The governing body of Clubhouse International, is comprised of board members from Clubhouses around the world; prominent members of the world community who believe deeply in our mission and can contribute to its support; Clubhouse members. Clubhouse Advisory Council: Dedicated members and staff from strong and Accredited Clubhouses around the world. The Council is responsible for advising, supporting and providing perspective to the Board of Directors and the Clubhouse International staff. Faculty for Clubhouse Development: The faculty is comprised of colleagues from a broad base of Accredited Clubhouses internationally. They conduct Accreditation visits and assessments, and are responsible for the formal quality assurance and improvement of the Clubhouse Accreditation process. Training Base Group: Authorized Clubhouse International Training Bases are located in the US (New York, Massachusetts, South Carolina, Missouri and Utah); Ontario, Canada; London, England; Helsinki, Finland; Oslo, Norway; Seoul, South Korea; Hong Kong; and Queensland, Australia. The Training Base Group is responsible for providing consistent training in the Clubhouse model to members , staff and board members from around the world. Board of Advisors: The purpose of the Board of Advisors is to assist and advise the Corporation with respect to matters that may affect the Corporation's achievement of its mission to promote and facilitate the rehabilitation of people with mental illness through the Clubhouse program. This would involve drawing on expertise form various disciplines, including, but not limited to, science and research in mental Program for Clubhouse Research: The Program for Clubhouse Research (PCR) is an affiliation between the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) and Clubhouse International. The Program for Clubhouse Research coordinates, promotes, and conducts Clubhouse research projects that are congruent with Clubhouse philosophy. In addition, it evaluates the effectiveness of Clubhouses and/or describes the services that Clubhouses provide for their members. The Program for Clubhouse Research also acts as a clearinghouse for Clubhouse research with the capacity to provide effective communication, dissemination of information and assistance to Clubhouses and researchers considering participation in Clubhouse research projects.

The Board of Directors and staff evaluate monthly Key Performance Indicators for: • Financial Performance - including fundraising • Membership • Training Participation • Accreditation - both completed and in process • Advocacy - measures include formal partnerships, progress in government relationships, etc. • Board Activity • Research In addition, we have a rolling three-year Strategic Planning process that guides our operational focus.

Although we celebrate our 25th year in 2019-2020, we are reminded that while we have made a great deal of progress in expanding the Clubhouse network, much work remains to be done. The achievements of the three-year period of 2015-2018, however, were instrumental to future growth ahead: • 488 groups trained (more than 28% increase over the goal of 380) • 57 new Clubhouses (nearly double the initial goal of 30) • More than 1,200 registrants trained in three separate seminar events • 234 Accreditation Visits (an increase of 56% over the initial goal of 150) • 223 Accredited Clubhouses (more than 10% above the goal of 200) • 108 trained Faculty The model itself has proven effective in a number of measures: • Employment, with longer on-the-job tenure for members engaging in Clubhouse Transitional Employment 1 • Cost effective, compared to other mental healthcare approaches (The cost of Clubhouses estimated to be one-third of the cost of the IPS model; about half the annual costs of Community Mental Health Centers; and substantially less than the ACT model.) 2 • A significant decrease in the number of hospitalizations, as a result of membership in a Clubhouse program. 3 • Reduced incarcerations, with criminal justice system involvement substantially diminished during and after Clubhouse psychosocial program membership. 4 • Improved Well-Being compared with individuals receiving psychiatric services without Clubhouse membership. Clubhouse members were significantly more likely to report that they had close friendships and someone they could rely on when they needed help. 5 • A recent study suggests that service systems should prioritize services that offer ongoing social supports like Clubhouses, as they enhance mental and physical health by reducing disconnectedness. 6 ¹Sources: ¹ Macias, Kinney and Rodican (1995). ² McKay, Yates, and Johnsen (2005); IPS model reported by Clark et al (1998); ACT model reported by Macias et al (2001). ³ De Masso, Avi-Itzak and Obler (2001). 4 Johnson and Hickey (1999). 5 Warner, Huxley and Berg (1999). 6 Leff and colleagues (2004). Clubhouse International (ICCD Clubhouses) are included in the USA Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices. Clubhouse International is a co-recipient of the 2014 Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize, given to an international non-profit organizations making substantial progress in alleviating human suffering. WHAT'S NEXT We continue to evolve the Standards of Accreditation as the needs of the membership and developing best practice evolve. We're looking at ways to leverage technology in supporting faculty and Clubhouse members to achieve economies of scale; of utmost importance is retaining the level of quality in our trainings. In addition, we have stretch goals for new clubhouse development and fundraising.

Financials

Clubhouse International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Clubhouse International

Board of directors
as of 6/12/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nicholas Ratut

Aquila Inc.

Term: 2017 - 2021

Norma Arnold

New York, NY

Beatrice Bergamasco

Milan, Italy

Fred Carpenter

Greenville, SC

Martin Dives

London, United Kingdom

Jeffrey Geller MD

Boston, MA

Mark Glickman (Emeritus member)

San Diego, CA

Anette Goelet

Baltimore, MD

Lorna Graev

New York, NY

Esko Hanninen (Emeritus member)

Helsinki, Finland

Hanne Juul (Emeritus member)

Storvorde, Denmark

William Madaus (Emeritus member)

Plymouth, MA

Steven Manning

Ft. Wayne, IN

Thomas Manning

Boston, MA

Nicholas Ratut

New York, NY

Julia Scott (Emeritus member)

New York, NY

Knut Stubben

Honefoss, Norway

Jennifer Tedesco

New York, NY

A. Baker Woolworth Jr.

New York, NY

Joel Corcoran

New York, NY

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/24/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/24/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

Mental Health, Mental Illness, Clubhouse