PLATINUM2022

AHRC NEW YORK CITY FOUNDATION INC

Realizing Potential.

New York, NY   |  http://ahrcnycfoundation.org/

Mission

Through its grants, the Foundation aims to empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to
• Make choices and decisions based on their own aspirations.
• Live as independently and be as productive as possible.
• Participate fully in their communities.
We envision a world in which people with disabilities will
• Share ordinary places in their local communities (such as stores, gyms, libraries and museums) at the same time and in the same ways as their neighbors.
• Develop a support network that includes a wide range of personal and social relationships.
• Fill valued roles in and make contributions to their communities.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Jennifer Goodwin

Main address

83 Maiden Lane

New York, NY 10038 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3779611

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

Single Organization Support (P11)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Through its grants, the Foundation aims to empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to • Make choices and decisions based on their own aspirations. • Live as independently and be as productive as possible. • Participate fully in their communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grant Awards

Based on the needs created by government funding cuts, new ideas about service delivery and increases in the incidence of certain disabilities (autism, for example), the Foundation currently focuses grant making in four areas:

• Job training and employment. We believe productive activity is a key to independence and self-esteem. We believe that everyone who wants to work should have a job that suits both his or her abilities and interests and the needs of the employer.

• Education. The earlier children with special needs begin attending school, the more likely they are to overcome delays and the less likely they are to need services later on in life. In addition, the higher the level of education young people with disabilities attain, the greater the likelihood they will secure employment.

• Camping and Recreation. For children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, camping and recreation are more than an opportunity for fun and relaxation (as important as that is). They also offer opportunities to learn new skills that build self-confidence and increase independence—for example, horseback riding, swimming and boating.

Equally important, camping and recreation programs provide a much-needed respite for families of both children and adults who live at home.

• Professional development of the workforce. Scientists, medical professionals and scholars are constantly bringing to light new information about intellectual and developmental disabilities and the most effective methods of teaching and treatment. The more quickly this information is disseminated to teachers and direct-support professionals and best practices are implemented, the more immediate and significant the benefits to children and adults with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

Grant Awards

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through its grants, the Foundation aims to empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to
• Make choices and decisions based on their own aspirations.
• Live as independently and be as productive as possible.
• Participate fully in their communities.

The AHRC New York City Foundation's grant making is strategic and targeted. We make grants for projects and programs that have clearly defined goals and directly benefit people with disabilities. Sometimes the grants are for innovative programs that advance methods of delivering services. Sometimes they sustain valuable programs when government funds are cut. In all cases there is a reasonable budget—not excessive, yet sufficient to do the work envisioned.

We follow up to make sure grant funds are used as proposed. We find out whether funded programs were successful and apply what we learn to future grant making.

Grant decisions are made from a business perspective. All AHRC New York City Foundation board members are successful business persons, active or retired. Our board includes members who also have investment and legal expertise

The AHRC New York City Foundation has a distinguished board of directors with a long-term record of giving and successful fundraising. The board includes individuals with investment expertise and legal expertise. All staff members have served 10 or more years and among them have expertise in event management, planned giving, foundation grants,direct mail and individual giving. The Foundation retains event-management, public-relations and web-development consultants and has a management agreement with AHRC New York City that gives the Foundation access to AHRC's large and expert supporting-services staff, including finance and accounting, human resources and IT. The Foundation's major fundraising events have been in existence for 20 to 35 years.

The Foundation's long-term goal is to empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to make choices and decisions based on their own aspirations, live as independently and be as productive as possible, and participate fully in their communities. The Foundation has made grants to a number of programs that are making progress toward that goal. For example, the Foundation underwrote a quality-assurance program at AHRC New York City that led to accreditation by the Council on Quality and Leadership (CQL), the primary organization that accredits agencies serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The accreditation process required that AHRC interview people being served. The interviews are designed to discover their dreams and level of satisfaction with various aspects of their lives, so AHRC can design individualized services accordingly. Using specific methods provided by CQL, people being served by AHRC rate the support they receive from the agency in meeting their goals. AHRC's scores are part of a national database maintained by CQL and are compared with those of other agencies.

Financials

AHRC NEW YORK CITY FOUNDATION INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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AHRC NEW YORK CITY FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 02/17/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Joel Isaacson

Joel Isaacson & Co.

Term: 2019 - 2022


Board co-chair

Jeanne Sdroulas

Fred Alger Management, Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2022

Kenneth Arbeeny

Sullivan & Worcester LP

MItchell Bloomberg

International Lights, Inc.

Kenneth Fisher

Fisher Brothers

Caroline Hirsch

Carolines on Broadway

Stephen Riggio

Elizabeth Wright Kahane

Milestone Partners

Michael Happel

Rubenstein Partners

Michael Rosen

Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP

Andreas Chrysostomou

Duff & Phelps

Gary Green

Alliance Baseball; Alliance Building Services

Angelo Aponte

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/17/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/07/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.