University Community Social Services Inc

We are more than just meatloaf.

aka University Community Social Services   |   New York, NY   |  www.meatloafkitchen.org

Mission

Our goals are to serve the needs of New York's less fortunate, hungry, and homeless people for food and the vital social services that will give them a springboard back to the mainstream of life. 

Every Saturday we prepare and serve a continental breakfast for approximately 120 guests and prepare and serve, as in a restaurant, a early afternoon dinner for approximately 340 guests. Simultaneously with our food preparation we also provide social services and a job readiness program. We feel strongly that our food program and our additional social services help establish a caring community which advances mutual respect among those who have and those who have not and makes our environment more humane. There is not one paid position in our operation; everything is done by volunteers.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Joseph J. Montano MA, LMSW

Main address

PO Box 20930

New York, NY 10009 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

University Community Soup Kitchen

EIN

13-4043507

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Congregate Meals (K34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Computer Skills Building Program

With donated hardware and software our guests can build their computer skills through our network of wireless computers.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Volunteers overseen by a professional social worker assist our guests with advice and referrals for their housing, healthcare, employment, legal and other social service needs. The Kitchen also partners with other local community groups to provide direct services to our guests, including food stamp registration, vision screening, cardiovascular screening and drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Guests are empowered to volunteer of their time at our Emergency Food Program popularly known as The Meatloaf Kitchen, assisting with food preparation, cooking, bussing tables, waiting tables, serving and clean up.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

University Community' Social Services' Emergency Food Program, now in its 28th year of operation.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Bimonthly food pantry supplying our guests with shopping bags brimming with fresh produce and pantry items to take away with them.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Emergency clothing distribution with personalized volunteer shoppers who assist the guests in finding their sizes and styles.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A drop-in for guests open at 8 am every Saturday providing indoor shelter from the outside weather and a lending and giveaway library.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

Legal assistance provided by pro-bono lawyers

Population(s) Served
Adults

Promoting children's literacy

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Certificate of Excellence 2009

United Way

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

University Community Social Services is aiming to alleviate the suffering of New York's neediest by providing nourishing meals, pantry items and a place of respite for our guests where they can obtain, social services, emergency clothing and computer user support with the goal of finding additional services, employment and housing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Hungry and homeless New Yorkers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Enacting changes to the meal distribution during the pandemic based on guests' feedback.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It creates a real sense of community which is an integral part of the name of our organization. We nurture and foster that as much as possible.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

University Community Social Services Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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University Community Social Services Inc

Board of directors
as of 5/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joseph Montano

No Affilation

Term: 2006 -

Catherine Woods

No Affiliation

Angela Kim

No Affiliation

Aklima Baksh

No Affiliation

Susan Shannon

No Affiliation

Michael Cunningham

No Affiliation

Steven Sakson

No Affiliation

Yulun Wang

No Affiliation

Joseph Montano

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability