WOLF CONSERVATION CENTER INC

aka WCC   |   South Salem, NY   |  www.nywolf.org

Mission

The Wolf Conservation Center's mission is to promote wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment, and the human role in protecting their future.

The WCC is an environmental education organization dedicated to conserving wolves and their habitat through education and direct participation in two federal wolf recovery programs. By providing science-based education programming with Ambassador wolves, we allow wolves and humans to better coexist, improve our efforts to successfully restore endangered wolves to their ancestral homes in the wild, and encourage a philosophy of respect for all living things. Nature is essential for the physical and emotional health of children and adults, our wolves help forge that connection.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Maggie Howell

Main address

PO Box 421

South Salem, NY 10590 USA

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EIN

13-4073912

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Onsite Eduation

Steeped in myth, the wolf has become a misunderstood predator who too often evokes fear. The WCC education programs open the door to understanding what wolves really are and offer direct exposure to an elusive predator people might not ever see in the wild. Through wolves we teach the broader message of conservation, ecological balance, and personal responsibility for improved human stewardship of our World.
All WCC programs are designed to conform to New York State Standards for Science Education and touch on a variety of disciplines from biology to history.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In the short time since wolves were reintroduced to the American West, scientific research has confirmed that they have restored stability to ecosystems. Wolves were once federally protected, but now they can be hunted again, making their future more controversial than ever before. Although critically endangered subspecies of wolves remain federally protected, they also face unique challenges that impact their wild future. Despite the vast effort, resources and support invested in reintroduction, the future of the wolf and its proven benefits to ecosystems remains at risk.

In recognition of this crisis, the Wolf Conservation Center has become a catalyst for change among a new generation of stewards who can reverse this trend before it is too late. "Interdisciplinary Curriculum in Wolf Education: Tracks to the Future” partners with educators in the implementation of a unique unit of study that affords elementary and middle school students differentiated opportunities to learn and master many of the required common core academic standards in Language Arts, Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies and the Arts while using the theme of wolf conservation as its integrating theme. It goals encourage students to pose and answer relevant questions about wolf recovery and conservation while they simultaneously acquire new knowledge, tools and the critical thinking skills that they will need as life-long learners, in general.

"Tracks to the Future” is an academically robust, relevant, and innovative "living curriculum.” It emphasizes cooperative learning, research and project-based learning, critical thinking and discussion, hands-on activities, and integrated service learning opportunities. Students develop and practice leadership skills by working in teams, listening to and accepting diverse opinions, solving problems, considering the long-term view, promoting actions that serve the greater good, and connecting with the community to make a difference.

While promoting broad academic achievement, Tracks to the Future has five guiding objectives: (1) nurturing an understanding of the critical role that the environment plays in human survival and the sustainability of the earth’s resources, (2) fostering an understanding of the scientific and cultural principles that guide wildlife conservation in America, (3) teaching the value of predators, specifically wolves, as ecosystem managers, (4) providing authentic opportunities for students to exercise citizenship and demonstrate their knowledge by educating others and advocating for positive changes in policies that affect wolves, and (5) increasing students’ awareness of the proactive role they can play in government to encourage change.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The WCC also participates in the Species Survival Plan (SSP) and Recovery Plan for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi). The Mexican gray wolf is among the rarest mammals in North America; at one time this species was completely extinct in the wild. Presently, there are approximately 400 Mexican gray wolves remaining in the world, the majority living in captivity within the network of facilities participating in the SSP.
Every one of these captive endangered wolves is a part of something bigger than their pack or the facilities that house them, they are integral parts of the recovery of their rare species. Many of these wolves contribute as "Ambassadors," living on view at a variety of zoos throughout the United States to help educate people about the importance of their wild counterparts. Some of these animals also contribute to the revitalization of their species as participants of the SSP captive breeding program. Gamete cryopreservation efforts allow even deceased wolves to contribute to wolf recovery via artificial insemination. The most fortunate fraction of captive wolves, however, contribute as candidates for release into the wild.

As the pre-eminent facility in the eastern United States for the captive breeding and pre-release of endangered wolf species, the WCC aims to become the National model in SSP standards and train other SSP’s to expand our mission impact and results.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The WCC participates in the Species Survival Plan (SSP) and Recovery Plan for the critically endangered red wolf (Canis rufus). The red wolf is among the rarest mammals in North America; the species at one time went completely extinct in the wild. Presently, there are approximately 300 red wolves remaining in the world, the majority living in captivity within the network of facilities participating in the SSP.

Every one of these captive endangered wolves is a part of something bigger than their pack or the facilities that house them, they are integral parts of the recovery of their rare species. Many of these wolves contribute as "Ambassadors," living on view at a variety of zoos throughout the United States to help educate people about the importance of their wild counterparts. Some of these animals also contribute to the revitalization of their species as participants of the SSP captive breeding program.

Gamete cryopreservation efforts allow even deceased wolves to contribute to wolf recovery via artificial insemination. The most fortunate fraction of captive wolves, however, contribute as candidates for release into the wild.
As the pre-eminent facility in the eastern United States for the captive breeding and pre-release of endangered wolf species, the WCC aims to become the National model in SSP standards and train other SSP’s to expand our mission impact and results.

Population(s) Served
Adults

WCC believes that every voice raised in support of wildlife and wild places can make a difference. And when we all work together we can make big things happen. In that vision, WCC urges our supporters in taking action via the Wolf Conservation Center's active advocate campaigns. Consistent, professional effort has resulted in over 2 million people following our work on Facebook or on our website where they are alerted to ways they can help save wolves locally and across North America. WCC also advocates through effectively communicating with their elected representatives, encouraging personal responsibility for improved human stewardship of our World.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Onsite visitors participating in educational programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Reproductive success of Critically Endangered Red Wolves and Mexican Gray Wolves

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mexican Gray wolf Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people WCC have mobilized to contact policy makers on both state and federal levels regarding habitat and wildlife protection.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We hope to foster a culture where wolves once again thrive in the wild; where they are valued as important contributors to a healthy ecosystem; given centuries of state-sponsored killing combined with a negative portrayal in literature – the Big, Bad, Wolf – has greatly diminished their standing.

To meet this goal, we employ three strategies education, advocacy and species preservation. Our educational programs have reached hundreds of thousands of people of all age ranges. In addition to a “classroom" portion, every educational program includes a visit to our four “ambassador" wolves, where visitors (behind fences) can observe first-hand wolf behaviors and biology. Advocacy efforts make use of our very active world-wide supporters and social media outreach; we inform advocates of upcoming legislation and how to make their voices heard. Lastly, as a member of two federal recovery programs, we have become a leader through a successful captive breeding and release program in which minimal interaction with humans prepares wolves for release.

Our education programs are a wonderful “first Introduction" to wolves. We have a team of educators who are also ardent conservationists; they lead programs and introduce visitors to our ambassador wolves. The success of our advocacy programs is reliant upon the WCC's advocacy staff, who carefully follows legislation, and alerts and mobilizes our very active cadre of activists. The WCC's 28-acre campus has ample room for a total of ten enclosures to house critically-endangered Mexican gray and red wolves, situated so that their interaction with humans is kept to a minimum.

In the WCC's short existence it has become a national leader in wolf education, advocacy and recovery. We recognize that the WCC has a long journey towards meeting its ultimate goals. Wolves are still viewed negatively by many people, and legislators are often swayed by local interests that are often not on the side of wolves.

Financials

WOLF CONSERVATION CENTER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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WOLF CONSERVATION CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Martha Handler

Jeffrey Blockinger

Och-Ziff

Martha Handler

Helene Grimaud

Dean Travalino

Susan Freund

Tripp Killin

Jeniam Foundation

Shari Wolf Ruckh

Claudia Neary

Cristian Civetta

Scott Kantro

Tracy Kraft

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes