AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Improving the lives of India’s underprivileged, with a special focus on women, children, and youth.

aka AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION (AIF)   |   New York, NY   |  www.aif.org

Mission

The American India Foundation is committed to improving the lives of India’s underprivileged, with a special focus on women, children, and youth. AIF does this through high impact interventions in education, health, and livelihoods, because poverty is multidimensional. AIF’s unique value proposition is its broad engagement between communities, civil society, and expertise, thereby building a lasting bridge between the United States and India.

Ruling year info

2001

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Nishant Pandey

Main address

216 E 45th Street 7th Floor

New York, NY 10017 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-4159765

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

International Relief (Q33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The American India Foundation is committed to improving the lives of India’s underprivileged, with a special focus on women, children, and youth. AIF does this through high impact interventions in education, health, and livelihoods, because poverty is multidimensional. AIF’s unique value proposition is its broad engagement between communities, civil society, and expertise, thereby building a lasting bridge between the United States and India. AIF’s programs emphasize inclusive models that focus on the unique needs of girls and women to achieve gender equity as a basis for sustainable change. Founded in 2001, we work in some of the most remote (or remotest) geographies of India, contributing to many of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Since 2001, AIF has impacted the lives of 6.7 million people, across 26 states with the support of 330 partners including community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI) utilizes a public-private partnership model to reduce maternal and child mortality by providing resources and support, thus empowering local communities to care for their mothers and children while improving the local health systems.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Women and girls

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) provides access to quality education opportunities to children in areas of seasonal migration, while also advocating to communities and governments the universal right to education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Digital Equalizer utilizes technology to bridge the educational and digital divide in India by transforming under-resourced schools into dynamic places to teach and learn through collaborative, project-based learning.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Banyan Impact Fellowship Program in India builds the next generation of service leadership committed to lasting change for underprivileged communities across India, while strengthening the civil sector landscape to be more efficient and effective.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adults

Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) provides underprivileged youth with skills training and access to formal employment opportunities.
As part AIF's Covid response, AIF is launching Project Entre-prerana which will be a systemic transformation intervention aimed at reviving the livelihoods of 1 million street vendors, micro entrepreneurs in India, all of whom have been badly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Ability Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE) trains persons with disabilities and facilitates their entry into the job market through advocacy, promoting inclusive growth in India.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Unemployed people

AIF was one of the first non-profits to provide support to the most vulnerable communities in India. The measures provided include critical life-saving medical equipment, PPEs for frontline health workers, hygiene kits for ASHAs and Anganwadi workers, and ration kits for the needy and elderly, including migrants who lost their livelihoods due to lockdown. Team AIF served more than 500,000 underprivileged people with Covid relief. AIF is now transitioning from relief work to rehabilitation of those badly affected by the pandemic.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Special Jury Award: Covid-19 Relief & Response 2020

IHW Council- CSR Health Impact Awards

Partners Excellence Award 2019

Hero Motocorp

Partners Excellence Award 2019

Aadi Shakti Mission Trust

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of migrant children retained in home village/ school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Migrant workers, Children

Related Program

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Figures in percentage of the total number of children belonging to migration-prone households. Due to Covid, not all seasonal hostels were set-up.

Number of times of improvement in students' competency levels in Language and Math through remedial classes- Average scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Migrant workers, Children

Related Program

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For students of grades 3-5. Figures are number of times of improvement in average scores. In 2020, Endline assessment could not be conducted due to the pandemic-induced lockdown and closure of schools

Percentage improvement in transition rates from Elementary to Secondary grade

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Migrant workers, Children

Related Program

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Figures in percentages

Percentage of improvement in learning outcomes (Math, Science and Social Science)- Class average

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Students

Related Program

Digital Equalizer (DE)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Figures in percentages. External evaluation for 2020-21 results awaited.

Number of student learning hours (Audio-visual room/ lab/ class- number of periods)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Students

Related Program

Digital Equalizer (DE)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Figures in number of hours per student

Number of hours of teachers' training completed on techno pedagogy, project based learning, kit-based education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Teachers

Related Program

Digital Equalizer (DE)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Figures in number of hours per teacher

Number of pregnant and lactating women/ eligible couples reached and counseled by MANSI staff

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of ASHA workers attending training on MoHFW approved home based new born case (HBNC)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of mothers who had at least 3 ante-natal care check ups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of newborns delivered at home who were visited by ASHA within 24 hours of birth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Pregnant people

Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of trained participants who gained employment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Figures are percentages of total trained.

Number of fellows who graduated from the Fellowship Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020, the numbers dipped as US fellows couldn't be included due to the Covid19 restrictions. The virtual heavy program this year was for an all-India cohort.

Number of host organisations (NGOs) partnered with for the Clinton Fellowship Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AIF aims to contribute to building an India, where all people can gain access to affordable education, health care and livelihood opportunities, and where all Indians can realize their full potential. AIF engages, informs, and inspires those passionate about India by building a trusted bridge, and secures a channel for philanthropic funding from the United States and other regions across the world, and its effective investment in the most innovative and scalable projects in India. AIF’s focus on community engagement, emphasizing our commitment towards ensuring sustainable development in India. Our programs create venues for affordable education, healthcare, livelihood opportunities, and leadership development with the support received from community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector.

1. Education

1.a. Digital Equalizer: Through the Digital Equalizer program, AIF transforms under-resourced schools into dynamic places to teach and learn through collaborative, project-based learning (SDG 4) by utilizing technology to bridge the educational and digital divide in India.
1.b. Learning and Migration Program (LAMP): AIF’s Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) provides access to quality education opportunities to children in areas of seasonal migration (SDG 4), while also advocating to communities and governments the universal right to education.

2. Livelihoods

2.a. Ability Based Livelihood Empowerment (ABLE): By training Persons with Disabilities (PwDs), AIF’s Ability-Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE) program facilitates their entry into the job market (SDG 8) through advocacy, and promotes inclusive growth in India (SDG 10).
2.b. Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST): Nourishing the vast potential of India’s youth, AIF’s Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) program provides underprivileged youth with skills training and access to formal employment opportunities.
2.c. Project Entre-prerana: AIF’s Project Entre-prerana is a systemic transformation intervention aimed at reviving the livelihoods of 1 million street vendors, micro entrepreneurs in India, all of whom have been badly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

3. Public Health: AIF’s Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI) program utilizes a public-private partnership model to reduce maternal and child mortality in rural and impoverished areas in India. Covering the states of Andhra Pradesh, Uttarakhand, and Odisha in India, MANSI empowers local communities to care for their mothers and children, while improving the local health systems by providing resources and support.

4. Leadership Development: The AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship provides a platform to young American and Indian professionals to develop their skills, resources and the network needed to become the next generation of leaders with a social conscience. The Fellowship creates a community of socially engaged, global citizens, who represent the leaders of tomorrow.

Since 2001, AIF has impacted the lives of 6.7 million people, across 26 states with support of 330 partners including institutional and government agencies, and private sector. AIF's programs deliver sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods to empower underprivileged children, women and men in India. AIF ensures to uphold principles of secularism, transparency, and accountability in all of our activities by focusing on:

1) Designing programs based on evidence, need and effective approaches, AIF and its teams continue to make efforts to understand communities’ needs and aspirations, and use approaches that have shown to be effective.
2) Monitoring the programs by making mid-course corrections, if required.
3) Field trials of innovations
4) Documenting the program so that the communities can learn, and also evaluating as to what could be done better, and how the program can be made more cost-effective,
5) Contributing towards knowledge management such as new programmatic approaches, new knowledge.
6) Expanding partnerships with existing and prospective partners, considering that low-cost solutions come from partners, and so does sustainability
7) Using advocacy to distribute knowledge gathered to help the development sector in becoming for efficient and effective.
8) Building capacities of key stakeholders and service providers through content development, training the trainers, partners’ meet, industry exposure, sharing of best practices, technical support etc.
9) Proving support services such as financing, institution building, platform building, marketing, up-skilling and entrepreneurship.

With offices in New York and California, twelve chapters across the U.S., and India operations headquartered in New Delhi, AIF is transforming lives across 26 states of India, while addressing development issues on a regional, country, and international scale.
AIF’s programs are aligned with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, a framework for collaboration between the profit and the non-profit sectors with complementary capabilities. Delivering sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods; our teams work hard to reach some of the remotest geographies in India.

1. Diverse backgrounds and vast experiences of the AIF board members, and the teams from US and India: The genesis of American India Foundation (AIF) lies in the leadership demonstrated by corporate leaders and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs in the USA, in response to a call by the former US President Bill Clinton in the aftermath of the Gujarat earthquake in 2001. Resources and support were mobilized quickly, primarily led by the business leaders of Indian origin, for relief and rehabilitation of the Gujarat earthquake victims. Since then AIF has been guided by humanitarian values coupled with corporate principles of trust, transparency and efficiency and has gone on to benefit not just from the support of US-based Corporate leaders of Indian origin but also from India-based business leaders as well business leaders of non-Indian origin too. AIF is further supported by a diverse team of program leaders and team members, who implement various programs to empower underprivileged children, women and men in India. (https://aif.org/about/people/)

2. Learnings gathered and quality outcomes achieved over the last 20 years: Delivering sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods, AIF has impacted the lives of 6.7 million people, across 26 states with support of 330 partners. We ensure to incorporated the learnings gathered over the last 20 years, to implement high impact interventions in education, livelihoods, public health and leadership development. https://aif.org/our-work/

3. Diverse Partnerships: AIF understands that cross-cutting partnerships are crucial to mobilize communities for large-scale change. Poverty is complex, and poor families and individuals face many challenges that are interwoven and manifold. For this reason, partnerships that work across AIF’s thematic areas of education, public health and livelihoods are especially essential for sustainable impact. Since the obstacles AIF seeks to overcome are systemic, multi-dimensional and challenging, multi-year, partnerships are vital for achieving the desired impact.

Since 2001, AIF has impacted the lives of 6.7 million people, across 26 states with support of 330 partners including community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector.

1. Education:

1.a. Digital Equalizer: Since its inception, Digital Equalizer has empowered 4,126,691 students with interactive STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) learning experiences, trained 152,644 teachers in STEM and technology focused pedagogy, and transformed 15,056 schools through innovative teaching and learning practices across 15 states in India.
1.b. Learning and Migration Program (LAMP): Through LAMP, AIF has impacted 583, 877 children with quality education across 2279 villages impacted by migration in 13 states of India. Since its inception in 2004, LAMP has trained more than 63,337 community members on various aspects of the RTE Act such as norms, roles and responsibilities of SMC members, and preparing School Development Plans (SDPs).

2. Livelihoods:

2.a. Ability-Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE): ABLE has trained 16,167 Persons with Disabilities (PwDs) in workplace readiness and industry skills, and created 9730 jobs for PwDs.
2.b. Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST): Through its MAST program, AIF has trained 124,673 disadvantaged young people in workplace readiness and industry skills, created 92,945 jobs across retail, IT, hospitality, electrical, automotive, and other industries.

3. Public Health:
Through Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI) program has treated 133,932 newborns, served 171,897 pregnant women and trained 2940 ASHAs (Community Health Workers) in 3,389 villages from Andhra Pradesh, Jharkhand, Uttarakhand, and Odisha.

4. AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship Program in India: Since the first cohort who assisted in the post-earthquake rehabilitation of Gujarat in 2001, the AIF Clinton Fellowship Program has successfully paired 490 Fellows in service with 214 host organizations across 25 States, thus representing a collective force and organized network dedicated to social change in India.

5. Covid-19 Response- AIF was one of the first non-profits to provide support to the most vulnerable communities in India. The measures provided include critical life-saving medical equipment, PPEs for frontline health workers, hygiene kits for ASHAs and Anganwadi workers, and ration kits for the needy and elderly, including migrants who lost their livelihoods due to lockdown. Team AIF served more than 500,000 underprivileged people with Covid relief. AIF is now transitioning from relief work to rehabilitation of those badly affected by the pandemic.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Listed below is the target population for each of our programs: Digital Equalizer program- Children in grades 6-8 (age group with maximum dropout rates) Learning & Migration Program- Children in areas of seasonal migration. Maternal & Newborn Survival Initiative- Pregnant women (ante natal, during delivery & post natal), Infants- in rural, impoverished areas. Market Aligned Skills Training- Disadvantaged youth Ability Based Livelihood Empowerment- People with disabilities

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Telephonic surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Below are a couple of examples of how our organization uses feedback to make changes: - Digital Equalizer Program: A baseline study revealed that the students had below grade level competencies, based on which we added a remedial component in our intervention. This led to an improvement in learning outcomes at the mid-line stage (2019). -Livelihoods: Since 2020, at the beginning of each intervention in each new geography, we conduct a comprehensive market scan. Through each of these researches, we take feedback from the Govt. authorities, private sector companies (potential employers) and potential beneficiary target segments. This helps us in designing need-based, relevant and effective interventions from the perspective of both demand (employers) and supply (beneficiaries).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Over the years, we believe that our relationship with our beneficiaries has become stronger as our interventions are designed specific to their needs and local context. We have started to shift our decision making strategies to a more data driven approach which has made our beneficiaries, donors and partners more involved in defining our program roadmaps.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Due to Covid, on field data collection has been challenging,

Financials

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 4/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Lata Krishnan

Chief Financial Officer, Shah Capital Partners

Term: 2001 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Harit Talwar

Head of Digital Finance, Goldman, Sachs & Co.

Term: 2019 - 2021

Pradeep Kashyap, Director Emeritus

Community volunteer

Lata Krishnan

Chief Financial Officer, Shah Capital Partners

Diaz Nesamoney

President & CEO, Jivox Corporation

Ajay Banga, CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Executive Chairman, MasterCard

Harit Talwar

Head of Digital Finance, Goldman, Sachs & Co.

Venkat Srinivasan

Managing Director, FountainHead Boston

Vimal Bahuguna

President, Drona Group, LLC

Ashish Dhawan

Founder and Chairman, Central Square Foundation and Ashoka University

Ash Lilani

Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Saama Capital

Rohit Kapoor

Vice Chairman and CEO, EXL

Nishant Pandey

Chief Executive Officer

Raj Sharma

Managing Director of Wealth Management and Head, The Sharma Group

Michael Steinberg

Managing Partner, Steinberg Asset Management

Jay Tambe

Partner, Jones Day

Victor Menezes,CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Retired Senior Vice Chairman, Citigroup

Raj Seshadri

President- Data & Services, Mastercard

Vivek Bantwal

Co-Head Global Financing Group, Goldman Sachs

Tasneem Chipty

Managing Director, AlixPartners

Vijay Vishwanath

Partner, Bain & Company

Shashin Shah

Founder & Managing Partner, Think Investments

Brian Pereira

President & CEO, Visterra

Sumir Chadha

Co-Founder & Managing Director, WestBridge Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/20/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.