DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH

aka The Episcopal Church   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.episcopalchurch.org

Mission

We are the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement, seeking every day to love God with our whole heart, mind and soul, and to love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:36-40). We follow Jesus into loving, liberating and life-giving relationship with God, with each other and with the earth.

Ruling year info

1944

Presiding Bishop

Rt. Rev. Michael Bruce Curry

Main address

815 Second Avenue

New York, NY 10017 USA

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EIN

13-5562208

NTEE code info

Religion Related, Spiritual Development N.E.C. (X99)

Buddhist (X50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Office of Government Relations

The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations represents the public policy priorities of the Episcopal Church to the U.S. government in Washington, D.C. The Office aims to shape and influence policy and legislation on priority issues, highlighting the voices and experiences of Episcopalians and Anglicans globally. All of OGR’s advocacy work is grounded in the resolutions of General Convention and Executive Council, the legislative and governing bodies of the Church. The Office maintains the Episcopal Public Policy Network (EPPN), a network of Episcopalians committed to carrying out advocacy. Become a member of the Episcopal Public Policy Network today and join Episcopalians working for a better world: advocacy.episcopalchurch.org.

Population(s) Served

Christian formation is the lifelong process of growing in our relationship with God, self, others, and all creation. Every experience in our lives can provide us with the opportunity to express our faith; the challenge we face is recognizing these opportunities and learning ways to live a sometimes countercultural life in a secular world.

Population(s) Served

Asian American or "Asiamerican” describes both Asian immigrants in the United States as well as Asian Americans born in the United States – Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Japanese, Southeast Asian (Vietnamese, Laotian, Hmong, Burmese), and South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan). It also describes the relationship of Asians in the United States with the Asian Episcopalians and Asian Anglicans in the global Asian community. The office of Asian American Ministries offers resources on mission work, church revitalization, and racial justice – among and beyond Asian communities in the United States. It assists dioceses to start new Asian congregations and strengthen existing ones, and advocates for Asian empowerment at all levels of the church: among seminarians, women, youth, clergy, and lay leaders.

Population(s) Served

The history of contributions to The Episcopal Church by its black clergy and black congregations is long and inspiring. The church pays tribute to this legacy by supporting and fostering the growth of black congregations through partnerships that reach across ethnic and racial boundaries, from the Episcopal provinces, dioceses, and deaneries to local parishes. Through the Recruitment, Training, and Development Program, black postulants and candidates for ministry are empowered and encouraged to seek vocations in lay and ordained ministries. This program offers an annual conference to provide historical perspectives of black Episcopalians in the church, leadership training, opportunities for networking, and mentoring for ongoing education and spiritual growth.

Population(s) Served

Children's enthusiastic expressions of faith can help transform the church and everyone in it. To assist children in fully participating in their church communities and in exploring their own ministries, we provide imaginative, innovative resources for those who work with children.

The Episcopal Church is serious in its call to love, shelter, protect, and defend children within its own community and in the world. The General Convention of The Episcopal Church adopted the Safe Church Resolution (B008) in 2003 to "Protect Children and Youth from Abuse.”

The Safeguarding God's Children program was developed to prevent and respond to child sexual abuse in everyday life and ministry. By keeping our children safe we can empower them to grow, receiving and responding to God’s love.

Population(s) Served

Groups from around the world have formed official links, finding their rewards in new friendships, mutual learning, and an expanded awareness of the world. Together, they share prayers and fight poverty, both in the United States and abroad.

Groups in companion relationships take on responsibility for each other. Although they come from far-reaching cultures and have differing customs and histories, they see the image of Christ reflected in each other.
There are hundreds of groups worldwide hoping to find partners. Help strengthen the Anglican Communion by reaching across cultural and geographic boundaries.
Partnership in mission is the heartbeat of the church, and is at the heart of relationships in the Anglican Communion and throughout the wider church. The Companion Relationship Program offers domestic dioceses in the United States opportunities to engage in mission activity with dioceses in other parts of the world, as part of the process of developing the cross-cultural nature of the Communion.

Population(s) Served

The Episcopal Church addresses domestic poverty in many ways: through its network of over 600 Jubilee Ministries; one- and two-year Justice and Advocacy Fellowships based on the Anglican Marks of Mission; Asset-Based Community Development; collaboration with diocesan and congregational ministries across the country; and annual block-grant programs for the development (or enrichment) of local ministry. Through these processes and ministries, The Episcopal Church seeks "to preach good news to the poor, to proclaim release to the prisoners and recovery of sight to the blind, to liberate the oppressed, and to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19).

Population(s) Served

The ecumenical movement is The Episcopal Church's response to Jesus' prayer for his disciples in John 17:21 "that they may all be one." The Office for Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Relations offers prayers for unity and participates in formal dialogues to nurture a spirit of understanding and respect, while collaborating actively in mission and ministry opportunities.

Population(s) Served

Care and justice for all creation is a core value of The Episcopal Church. Eco-justice ministries seek to heal, defend, and work toward justice for all God's creation and to respect the kinship and connection of all that God created through education, advocacy, and action.

Population(s) Served

Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM), the refugee resettlement program of The Episcopal Church, lives the call of welcome by supporting refugees, immigrants, and the communities that embrace them as they walk together in The Episcopal Church’s movement to create loving, liberating, and life-giving relationships rooted in compassion. Through EMM, The Episcopal Church is one of nine national agencies working in a public-private partnership with the federal government to resettle children, women, and men who have had to flee their home countries because of war, violence, or persecution. EMM’s desire to honor the inherent value of human connection brings communities together to love their neighbors as themselves.

Population(s) Served

Federal chaplains serve those in the military, Veterans Administration hospitals, and federal prisons, providing spiritual and day-to-day support to service men and women overseas and stateside, veterans requiring medical services, and the incarcerated. They bring spiritual healing and comfort to those with no other faith resources.

If you are interested in federal military or prison chaplaincy, call the office of the Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries; the Deputy Endorser will explain the programs, the application process, and will stay involved with you each step of the way.

Population(s) Served

Ecclesiastical healthcare endorsement is required for certification by certain professional organizations, such as the Association of Professional Chaplains, the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, and the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. The Episcopal Church's ecclesiastical endorser works with chaplains and bishops to facilitate this process.

Population(s) Served

The goal of Native American/Indigenous Ministries is the full inclusion of Native and Indigenous peoples in the life and leadership of The Episcopal Church.

Population(s) Served

Being an advocate does not always involve drastic measures. Every day, we have the chance to stand up and speak when we see the need. Advocates have the opportunity to speak to their elected representatives, friends, family, and congregations about important issues.

The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations cannot advocate for important issues alone. It needs individuals and congregations to write to their representatives, ask for support on social justice issues, and make their voices heard. Working together, we can send a strong message to Congress. Become a member of the Episcopal Public Policy Network today and join committed Episcopalians working for a better world.

Population(s) Served

Latino/Hispanic Ministries guides the church in forming hospitable communities of faith that nourish, strengthen, and develop disciples of Christ in the Anglican tradition within Spanish-speaking communities.

Population(s) Served

"The Heartbeat of the Church is Mission." — the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church
The Mission Personnel Office offers members of The Episcopal Church a chance to enter into relationships with people outside national and cultural borders and to nurture worldwide partnerships.
Individuals who feel called to serve God across cultural boundaries have the opportunity to serve as Episcopal missionaries in over 25 countries around the Anglican Communion, supporting local church communities in their calling to participate in God’s mission. Missionaries are doctors, nurses, teachers, accountants, agriculturalists, computer technicians, administrators, theologians, and communicators. Missionaries are lay and ordained, young and old.

Population(s) Served

We are a growing network of leaders who are committed to nurture faith communities that are making a difference in the local contexts they are called to serve. Some of these networks are challenging traditional church practices by placing greater value on discerning the Holy Spirit’s presence and activity. Some of these networks have chosen to work in more traditional settings while keeping fresh stories of hope and faith at the center of their life together.
"New Church Starts" are often the traditional "tall steeple" model but they can also be storefront ministries committed to regular worship that welcomes all. "Missional Initiatives" may not include public worship but, through mission and evangelism, they engage under-represented groups, including youth and young adults, people of color, poor and working-class people, people with a high-school diploma or less, and/or people with little or no church background or involvement. (This is a quote from General Convention 2012’s solution AO73 - the call to action that funded this position, as well as 38 new ministries across the Episcopal Church).
A significant of our focus is on training leaders to be aware of evidence of the Holy Spirit at work outside the walls of the church - to learn the practices of "hosting conversations that matter," cultivating the safe space to try on risky new leadership behaviors, as each other the courage to say "Yes!" to all that God is birthing in our times.

Population(s) Served

More than one in three Episcopalians is over the age of 65, and another 41% of Episcopalians are between the ages of 45 to 64. That means three of every four members of the Episcopal Church are age 45 or older. In terms of economic stressors alone (retirement age, technology gaps, social services, Social Security, and Medicare) the impact of this demographic group on local congregations is profound.

In recognition of this, the 2003 General Convention passed resolution A007 (link is external), establishing the Task Force for Older Adult Ministries. In 2009, General Convention passed a further resolution, D004 (link is external), recognizing the church's need for Older Adult Ministry and the importance of endeavoring to answer the following questions:

How do we recognize, honor, and utilize the experience, wisdom, and gifts of "older" adults?

How do we develop ministries that integrate and weave multiple generations together spiritually?

How do we cultivate Christ's message of hope and service for older adults, families, and their caregivers?

How do we examine, explore, and create innovative and contemporary liturgical, spiritual, and service ministries by, with, and for all generations in the Body of Christ?

Population(s) Served

The Episcopal Church is committed to welcoming all people, spiritually and physically, which includes becoming more hospitable and accessible to those who are living with disabilities. This also includes encouraging people living with disabilities to become more active church members, to take leadership roles, and to increase awareness of people in the church of the gifts that people living with disabilities contribute.

Population(s) Served

Because the prison system can be a painful and damaging process for inmates and their families, these individuals are often in great need of being treated with dignity and compassion, as our faith calls us to do. Episcopal Prison Ministries works with inter-religious groups and government officials to assist inmates and their families, as well as those on parole, supports summer camp programs for children of people who are incarcerated, and calls for reform not only of the prison system but of the criminal justice system.

Population(s) Served

In the ministry of Racial Reconciliation, there are as many perspectives on what reconciliation looks like as there are Episcopalians. While we share the commitment to justice and equity proclaimed in our Baptismal Covenant, the heartfelt and legitimate differences between us can prevent our listening deeply to one another and seeing Christ in one another. Yet, in the face of these differences and challenges, Episcopalians throughout the Church are engaged in important ministries of reconciliation and healing, and are building loving, inclusive, and resilient communities in a diverse range of social, cultural, and political contexts. This page serves as a resource for all people of faith interested in learning more about the work of racial reconciliation, in the Episcopal Church and beyond.

Population(s) Served

The Office of Research examines local trends and demographics, which can help Episcopal congregations grow and better respond to the needs of their communities. Congregations that are more welcoming to newcomers offer more opportunities for transformation and mission. The "Studying Your Congregation and Community" charts break down social and demographic characteristics of Episcopal churches and their communities by geographical location. Trends in membership, average worship attendance, and financial giving can be used to indicate growth, decline, or stability. The community demographic profile provides an overview of a one-mile radius of a congregation’s physical location.

Population(s) Served

The Office of Social Justice and Advocacy Engagement is responsible for engaging Episcopalians in building, resourcing, and empowering advocacy movements and networks for social justice at a local and community level. Together with people in the pews, lay leaders, and clergy, the office develops and supports diocesan State Public Policy Networks, which build and support locally led coalitions for social change according to the policy positions of The Episcopal Church.
The Office of Social Justice and Advocacy Engagement executes creative leadership initiatives to mobilize Episcopalians on issues of social change, and seeks to build and enhance communities committed to transforming unjust structures in societies, and to accompany and enrich the ministry of Episcopalians working to be catalysts for equality, justice, and transformation within their communities.

Population(s) Served

The Office for Transition Ministry guides individuals (lay and ordained), congregations, and institutions through their times of discernment and calling. Bishops and transition ministers can list their open positions, search the database, receive training, and download helpful forms and publications. Clergy, seminarians, and lay leaders are matched by their skills with ministry opportunities in parishes, diocesan offices, and church-related organizations. Congregations are supported throughout the entire search process, from the listing of the position to creating the parish portfolio while providing interim and search process resources.

Population(s) Served

United Thank Offering (UTO) is a ministry of The Episcopal Church for the mission of the whole church. Through United Thank Offering, men, women, and children nurture the habit of giving daily thanks to God. These prayers of thanksgiving start when we recognize and name our many daily blessings. Those who participate in UTO discover that thankfulness leads to generosity. United Thank Offering is entrusted to promote thank offerings, to receive the offerings, and to distribute the UTO monies to support mission and ministry throughout The Episcopal Church and in invited Provinces of the Anglican Communion in the developing world.

Population(s) Served

In recent years, increasing numbers of Episcopalians in their 20s and 30s have been serving in leadership roles in congregations, on college campuses, in local justice movements, in new Christian communities, and through a year of mission service. The Office of Young Adult and Campus Ministries provides leadership development and networking opportunities for those in leadership with young adults both on and off college campuses.

Population(s) Served

Are you 21 to 30 years old?

Are you ready for an experience that will transform your life?
Do you want to be a part of what God is doing in the world?
Do you want to experience diverse cultures, make a spiritual commitment, and reflect on your vocational possibilities?
If your answer is "Yes!" then you are ready to work with the Young Adult Service Corps (YASC) in a one-year assignment.
Applicants must have a high degree of maturity and possess a faith commitment, the willingness to be a humble guest, and the ability to be an authentic companion. The Young Adult Service Corps brings young adults into the life of the worldwide Anglican Communion and into the daily work of a local community. At the same time, it brings the gifts and resources of the church into the lives of young adults as they explore their own faith journeys.

Population(s) Served

Youth Ministries calls for passion, patience, and faithfulness – pointing out the sacred in the midst of the chaos of adolescence and walking faithfully with young people as they transition from child to young adult. Youth Ministries is a bridging ministry of education, connection, formation, and hopefully, transformation.

Responding to the spiritual needs of teens is about building trusting relationships. The Episcopal Church strives to walk with young people on their journeys from childhood to adulthood, recognizing their gifts for ministry, their questions about spirituality, and their desire to make a difference in the world. The Youth Ministries Office is grounded in the Five Marks of Mission and the Baptismal Covenant, building churchwide networks to invite, inspire, affirm, and equip youth for discipleship and Christian leadership in their lives and their communities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement, seeking every day to love God with our whole heart, mind and soul, and to love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:36-40). We follow Jesus into loving, liberating and life-giving relationship with God, with each other and with the earth.

EVANGELISM: Listen for Jesus' movement in our lives and in the world. Give thanks. Proclaim and celebrate it! Invite the Spirit to do the rest.

RECONCILIATION: Embody the loving, liberating, life-giving way of Jesus with each other

CREATION CARE: Encounter and honor the face of God in creation

Embody the work of two million Episcopalians across 16 countries

Many lives have been reoriented towards the way of Jesus, not self-centered but other-directed.

Financials

DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Board of directors
as of 9/17/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rt. Rev. Michael Curry

See website See website

See list at https://extranet.generalconvention.org/governing_and_interim_bodies/executive_council/roster

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes