PLATINUM2024

Episcopal Actors' Guild

providing assistance to NYC's professional performers "of all faiths, and none"

aka EAG   |   New York, NY   |  www.actorsguild.org

Mission

The Episcopal Actors' Guild provides emergency aid and support to professional performers of all faiths and none undergoing financial crisis. We are also dedicated to helping emerging artists advance their careers through scholarships, awards, and performance opportunities.

Ruling year info

1928

Executive Director

Karen Lehman Foster

Main address

1 E 29th St

New York, NY 10016 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5563397

NTEE code info

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We understand the importance of art and artists in our community. However, we know that it is difficult for the performers we serve to maintain consistent employment due to the nature of the industry (shows closing, short contracts for film and tv projects, reduced theatrical seasons). When a crisis (such as an injury or illness, pandemic, or union strike) hits, it can feel impossible for a performer to stay on their artistic path while keeping a roof over their head and putting food on the table. That's where we come in. Since 1923, EAG has been a safety net for NYC performers in crisis. Not only do we provide an emergency financial grant, we provide a variety of services to support the performer until they can find employment. In the theatre community, we are well-known as a resource where one can receive assistance without judgment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Emergency Aid & Relief Program (EARP)

Since 1923, EAG's primary program has been our EMERGENCY AID & RELIEF PROGRAM (EARP). Through EARP, we provide confidential, expeditious, and compassionate emergency financial assistance and counseling to professional performing artists in New York City. Grants made through our EARP address such crucial issues as rental arrears, eviction, utility shutoffs, emergency medical/dental costs, and sustenance needs. In urgent cases, we can provide a vendorized check on the same day a client applies. We pride ourselves in being one of the only agencies committed to providing IMMEDIATE emergency financial assistance to those in crisis. Funds disbursed through our EARP are outright grants; EAG does not expect repayment, services, or products in return for grants.

EAG helps NYC’s professional performers regardless of religion, race, national origin/ethnicity, gender identity and/or expression, sexual orientation, age, physical/mental ability, political ideology/affiliations, or language.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Economically disadvantaged people

Our program was an early responder to the HIV/AIDS crisis, helping many stricken individuals during those critical first years. In 1998, we further strengthened our support of this community by establishing The HIV/AIDS Program under a separate budget line, ensuring that PWA applicants do not have to compete with other clients for access to our limited resources. Currently, 20% of our Emergency Aid and Relief Program budget is earmarked for our HIV/AIDS clients.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
People with HIV/AIDS
Economically disadvantaged people

The Episcopal Actors' Guild's ACTORS PANTRY started in 2014 in response to an increasing number of our professional performing artist clients--particularly those with children, those over age 65, and those with disabilities--reporting hunger and food insecurity when they applied for financial assistance from our Emergency Aid & Relief Program.

Through this program, clients are eligible to receive free, nutritious, high-quality, nonperishable food items from our onsite food pantry to help them weather their crisis. We will also provide clients with one $25 grocery store gift card per month so they can supplement our shelf-stable items with fresh foods. Those who are homebound due to age or disability are eligible to receive $100 in grocery deliveries placed through Instacart each month.

Our clients are welcome to use the Actors Pantry for as long as their need persists. Because we value their privacy, we make this service available by appointment only.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Economically disadvantaged people

Started in 2012, EAG's annual HEADSHOT PROJECT provides free, professional photographs to performing artists who are previous recipients of assistance from our Emergency Aid & Relief Program, giving them a valuable and necessary tool for advancing their careers. This project grew out of the Executive Director's observation that the headshot photos used by her clientele were often outdated and no longer effective in obtaining work; however, the cost of new headshots was often beyond their means.

The Headshot Project has grown from 3 partial days in April 2012 to 6 full days in May 2022. During the days of the Headshot Project, EAG's headquarters are transformed into a photography studio. Clients are provided a session with a professional make-up artist and a professional photographer. Each client receives all their full color, digital shots via Dropbox (or DVD) with free retouching on one photo. We’ll even recommend options for where to go affordable, good quality reproductions.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Economically disadvantaged people

Each December, EARP provides supplemental $150 grants through our Children’s Holiday Fund to the young children of our clients who are experiencing a crisis during the holidays.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Each year, scholarships are awarded to five students at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, and to one theatre student at the University of Missouri (in honor of George C. Scott).

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Students

Each year, EAG partners with a local theatre company to present staged readings of three new works by emerging playwrights, with one being given a $500 award.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers

Performers are often advised to take classes between gigs to keep their skills sharp, but classes and workshops can be prohibitively expensive, so EAG started ARTIST AFTERNOONS in 2015. Through Artist Afternoons, EAG hosts free career development, performance, and self-care workshops. These classes are geared towards performing artists but open to the community at large and cover a variety of topics from tax tips to audition techniques.

Our Artist Afternoons have become a major piece of our outreach and support strategy, allowing us the opportunity to connect with those we serve and those who may benefit from our assistance.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers

EAG takes pride in our ongoing effort to find new ways to support NYC's performing arts community. Understanding how challenging it is for emerging theatre companies to find affordable space for creating work, we are proud to offer the Open Stage Grant. Through this program, two active and emerging theatre companies are chosen to receive 6 weeks (8 hours per week) of free time in our historic theatre space. With this time, the recipient will be able to rehearse and present a work of their choosing. The residency culminates with 4-8 performances, all of which are ticketed and open to the public, with proceeds being split evenly between the grant recipient & the charitable programs of EAG.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers

Where we work

Awards

Champion Award 2021

New York Innovative Theatre Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Economically disadvantaged people, People with HIV/AIDS, Seniors

Related Program

The Emergency Aid & Relief Program (EARP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

EAG provides IMMEDIATE emergency financial assistance to address crucial issues such as rental arrears, eviction, and housing court stipulations. (Data is for each Fiscal Year ending on March 31.)

Number of people unable to obtain or delaying needed medical care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Economically disadvantaged people, People with diseases and illnesses, Substance abusers, Pregnant people

Related Program

The Emergency Aid & Relief Program (EARP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

EAG provides IMMEDIATE emergency financial assistance for medical bills for surgeries, health insurance, and out-of-pocket medical costs. (Data is for each Fiscal Year ending on March 31.)

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Economically disadvantaged people, People with HIV/AIDS, Seniors

Related Program

The Emergency Aid & Relief Program (EARP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

EAG provides IMMEDIATE emergency financial assistance to address crucial issues such as utility arrears and service termination notices. (Data is for each Fiscal Year ending on March 31.)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For nearly one hundred years, EAG has been helping to bridge the inevitable gaps that happen in performing arts careers so these artists can keep working in the career of their choice. We know that artistic careers are "real" jobs and we provide a toolkit so that NYC's performers can have longevity in their industry.

Our clients are professional performers (actors, singers, and dancers) who have proof of income from an established and ongoing theatrical career of at least 5 consecutive years. (For performing artists who have retired or gone on disability, we consider the active portion of their career.) To qualify for assistance, an individual must live in one of the five boroughs of New York City or in the surrounding metro area and demonstrate their financial need.

We help people regardless of religion, race, national origin/ethnicity, gender identity and/or expression, sexual orientation, age, physical/mental ability, political ideology/affiliations, or language.

Our primary program is the EMERGENCY AID & RELIEF PROGRAM (EARP) which provides emergency financial assistance and counseling to performers, helping to address such crucial issues as eviction, housing court stipulations, utility shutoffs, emergency medical/dental costs, and sustenance needs.

Through our ACTORS PANTRY (est. 2014), clients can select nutritious food staples to help them weather their crisis. People can choose which foods they want as well as how much they receive and how often.

EAG was an early responder to the HIV/AIDS crisis. In 1998, we strengthened our support of this community by establishing our HIV/AIDS PROGRAM. Currently, 20% of our EARP budget is earmarked for those clients living with HIV/AIDS, who require unique, ongoing help, ensuring that these applicants do not have to compete with other clients for access to our limited resources. In 2017, our board voted unanimously to raise the maximum annual grant for our HIV/AIDS, senior, and disabled clients from $750 to $1000. 15% of our overall clientele are living with HIV/AIDS. 14% of our overall clientele are seniors age 65+.

Through our CHILDREN'S HOLIDAY FUND, the EARP provides 50 supplementary $150 grants annually to the young children of our clients who are experiencing a crisis during the holiday season.

We also work to help our clients to achieve their career goals. In 2012, we introduced the HEADSHOT PROJECT, providing free, professional photographs to clients who otherwise could not afford them. In 2015, we started ARTIST AFTERNOONS, a free monthly career development and self-care seminar series. In 2017, we established the OPEN STAGE grant, providing 2 emerging theatre companies with 6-week space grants in our facilities for rehearsal and performance.

All three team members (Executive Director Karen Lehman Foster, Assistant Director Rebecca Lovett, and Office Manager Jamie Soltis) have backgrounds in both arts non-profits and performance and continue to develop their skills via seminars. Because we are a small organization, we are easily accessible and personally responsive to NYC's performing arts community.

EAG is governed by a Council of 36 men and women from different areas of the performing arts community. This group meets 5 times a year to provide oversight on our finances, major programs, fundraising efforts, and budgeting. Between meetings, EAG has a very active committee structure. Our 4 person Grants Committee provides oversight to our primary program, the Emergency Aid & Relief Program. This committee regularly meets with the Executive Director to review the details of every grant disbursed. They are also available via email outside of meetings to provide advice. Our Treasurer and Finance Committee regularly meet and review the unaudited financial report provided by staff monthly.

EAG also has a membership base (687 people) that supports our mission through individual giving, volunteering, and spreading the word about EAG. Membership starts at only $30 per year and is open to anyone interested in celebrating the talent and dedication needed to sustain a career in the performing arts.

For nearly 100 years, the Church of the Transfiguration (aka The Little Church Around the Corner) has provided our historic theatre/office space to EAG free of charge. (Value: $85,000 annually)

EAG is part of a coalition of performers’ charities that include the Actors Fund, MusiCares, and Musicians Foundation. This coalition meets monthly to provide the maximum amount of assistance to our shared clients. We also are part of a group that receives federal funding through United Way’s Emergency Food and Shelter Program (EFSP). We work with other EFSP agencies such as Catholic Charities and the Salvation Army.

We make fundraising a priority and have received recognition from organizations such as NY State Council on the Arts, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, United Way NYC, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, The Shubert Organization, the Valentine Perry Snyder Fund, Waldman Foundation, and Sermoonjoy Fund.

EAG has been a steady force for good in the performing arts community for 100 years. We believe we are meeting our criteria for success every day. No qualified professional performer who has asked us for help has ever been turned away.

We work expeditiously and compassionately to ensure that our clients’ needs are being addressed. We pride ourselves on being one of the only agencies committed to providing immediate emergency financial assistance. In urgent cases, we can provide the client with a vendorized check on the same day they apply and advise them on additional assistance for which they can apply.

In our most recently completed fiscal year (April 1, 2022-March 31, 2023), we gave 461 grants to NYC’s performing artists. We gave 210 grants for rental arrears keeping families safely housed. We helped with 145 grants for utility arrears, so the lights stayed on and phones and high-speed internet remained connected. We gave 67 grants for sustenance needs such as MetroCards, food, or clothing. And we helped 40 people with medical bills for surgeries, health insurance, and out-of-pocket medical expenses so needed care was not delayed or discontinued. During that same time, we saw 540 visits to our pantry. (This is down from pandemic highs of 942 visits in FY21-22 and 902 visits in FY20-21, but nearly DOUBLE the 286 visits we saw in FY19-20.)

We are always listening to our clients and looking for ways to help them achieve their goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people

Financials

Episcopal Actors' Guild
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Episcopal Actors' Guild

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Anthony Newfield

Jennifer Fouché

Peter Von Berg

Fr. John David van Dooren

Eric Stamm

Bernadette Fiorella

Mr. Mierre

Glauco Silva Araujo

Meryl Goodfader

Joan Kane

Sondra Lee

leslie Shreve

Jo Yang

Anstice Carroll

Chris Chinn

Laurel Lockhart

Leslie Middlebrook

Betsy Ross

Margot Astrachan

Ruthann Daniels

Claudia Dumschat

Steven Hayes

Tyrone Mitchell Henderson

Mervyn Kaufman

Richard Arthur Olson

Margaret Goodman

Reynaldo Piniella

Rachel Leslie

Gary Sloan

JoAnn Yeoman

Teri Black

Patricia McNamara

Bob Ost

Craig MacArthur Doležel

Johnny Culver

Ariel Estrada

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/2/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/25/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.