Catholic Relief Services, Inc.

faith. action. results.

aka Catholic Relief Services - USCCB   |   Baltimore, MD   |  http://www.crs.org

Mission

Catholic Relief Services carries out the commitment of the Bishops of the United States to assist the poor and vulnerable overseas. We are motivated by the Gospel of Jesus Christ to cherish, preserve and uphold the sacredness and dignity of all human life, foster charity and justice, and embody Catholic social and moral teaching as we respond to major emergencies, fight disease and poverty, and nurture peaceful and just societies. We assist people on the basis of need, not creed, race or nationality.

Ruling year info

1946

CEO & President

Mr. Sean L. Callahan

Main address

228 West Lexington Street

Baltimore, MD 21201 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5563422

NTEE code info

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Roman Catholic (X22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a religious organization.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the official overseas development agency of the Catholic Church in the United States, we help Catholics in parishes, diocese and schools live their faith by participating in programs that work to end poverty and injustice around the world. Focusing on innovative programs in agriculture, health and emergency response, our partnerships with communities and Church institutions continue to grow. Our over 75 years of experience have enabled us to address urgent needs and develop sustainable solutions that help end poverty now - and for future generations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HIV and AIDS

Catholic Relief Services' HIV and AIDS programming is a central and growing component of our efforts to relieve suffering in the world.

Population(s) Served

Catholic Relief Services continues to provide lifesaving food and supplies to fortify countless survivors of natural disasters as they rebuild their lives.

Population(s) Served

Catholic Relief Services works through local partner agencies to implement agriculture and environment programs for the poorest families and rural communities worldwide.

Population(s) Served

Catholic Relief Services take an integrated approach to health assistance.  To promote lifesaving interventions in each of the countries in which we serve, CRS engages a variety of partners, including the local Church and ministries of health.

Population(s) Served

CRS and its partners promote and support access to quality basic education for all.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2013

American Institute of Philanthropy 2013

Association of Fundraising Professionals 2013

Philanthropy 400 2013

Association of Fundraising Professionals 2013

Charity Navigator 2013

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2013

InterAction - Member 2013

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2013

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

127 million people in 114 countries around the world benefited from Catholic Relief Services programs in 2018.

Number of projects directly realted to Emergency Response and Recovery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018 CRS spent 379 million on 196 disaster-related programs in 57 countries. We work with a network of partners to provide vital necessities in the aftermath and to help rebuild over the long term

Number of Agriculture-related projects

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Agriculture

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018, CRS spent $116 million on Ag projects in 49 countries that help small-scale farmers and their families recover after natural and man-made disasters, and adapt to a changing global climate.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In remote and underserved communities, we address social inequities and work with families to prevent disease, provide better maternal care, and improve health and well-being for vulnerable children.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops founded Catholic Relief Services (crs.org) in 1943 to carry out the Gospel call to love and serve poor and vulnerable people through acts of charity and the pursuit of justice. Since then, CRS has evolved into an international humanitarian organization of more than 5,000 people. In 2017, we served 136.4 million people worldwide.

In collaboration with approximately 1,951 partner organizations, we work across seven program sectors: emergency response and recovery, agriculture, health, education, justice and peacebuilding, water and sanitation, and microfinance. Our programs are need based, and reach poor and vulnerable women, men, girls and boys overseas without regard to race, sex, nationality or religion.

Since the early 2000s, CRS has applied a theory of change grounded in the concept of integral human development, which promotes the good of the whole person and every person. Rooted in Catholic teaching, integral human development supports the ability of each individual to realize their full human potential in the context of just and peaceful relationships, a thriving environment and solidarity with others. This goal for individuals and society is a long-term, dynamic process. It occurs when civil society and the public and private sectors work collaboratively at individual, family, community, regional, national and international levels to:

• Protect human life and dignity by caring for poor, vulnerable and marginalized people

• Increase resilience by protecting, building and maximizing family and community human, social, political, physical, financial, natural and spiritual assets

• Promote right relationships among all people, and within and across families, communities and nations

• Increase equitable and inclusive access to—and influence—structures and systems at all levels

CRS contributes our unique expertise and relationships to the realization of IHD through the following actions:

• Building capacity of our partners and CRS potential by supporting families and communities in moving from vulnerability to resilience through equitable and inclusive livelihood strategies

• Prove and scale up evidence-based approaches that respond to local needs and foster local leadership

• Cultivate strong relationships that support effective collaboration, mutual learning, joint leadership and local innovation across the global network of Catholic organizations and individuals that share our vision of IHD

• Build connections across the public and private sectors and civil society to create lasting solutions to poverty and injustice

• Influence policies and practices that promote integral human development

The goals of our 5-year strategic plan for 2014‒18, at crs.org/agency-strategy/, are to:

• Increase to 150 million the number of poor and vulnerable people we serve overseas by continuously improving programs that respond to emergencies, strengthening the health, well-being and livelihoods of families and communities, and nurturing peaceful and just societies

• Inspire and engage more than 10 million Catholics in the United States to take action in solidarity with poor and vulnerable people overseas as an integral part of our faith

The following four strategic priorities will help us achieve these goals:

• Attain leadership in signature program areas for greater impact and influence

• Deepen expertise in five targeted core competencies across CRS

•Strengthen engagement in the United States and overseas with other Catholic Church organizations and individuals to promote integral human development

•Reinforce an organizational culture of high performance and accountability

We continue to align and mobilize our resources toward these priorities.

Since 1943, Catholic Relief Services has been a force for lasting, positive change in the world. Built on the faith, compassion and reach of the global Church and the generosity of our donors, we are uniquely qualified to serve the poor and vulnerable. With a global workforce of 7,000, and a deep and broad network of local and international partners, we are recognized for our holistic approach, expertise and results across seven program sectors that respond to humanitarian needs and advance human development.

CRS considers the following core competencies critical organizational capabilities:

• Collaborating with and supporting partners: Only through strong collaborative relationships across civil society and the public and private sectors can lasting, positive solutions to poverty and injustice be achieved. CRS has worked for many years to “connect the dots" among myriad stakeholders—from local partners and governments to small-scale farmers and international businesses—to promote collaborative, mutually beneficial relationships. As a faith-based, private organization, CRS is committed to supporting local civil society actors, including Catholic Church and community-based organizations, to strengthen their capacity to contribute to lasting and meaningful social change. CRS has particularly strong expertise in capacity building and institutional strengthening.

• Integrating justice and peacebuilding: At the heart of the social mission of the Catholic Church is a call to work for justice and peace. Cultivating just and peaceful societies is part of our mission statement and an essential component of integral human development. We are committed to strengthening our efforts to integrate justice and peacebuilding into our work—by promoting equity and inclusion regardless of sex, age, ethnicity, race and religion.

• Monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning: Our commitment to operational and programmatic excellence demands continuous improvement in our ability to document, analyze and apply learning at the project, sector and agency levels, and to share that learning with stakeholders, practitioners and policymakers.

• Information and communications technology for development: ICT4D harnesses the potential of technology to improve both programs and operation. CRS is an emerging leader in this area. Our capabilities developed—and continue to develop—rapidly, as needs and ideas emerge in the field, and through thought leadership and technical support sourced internally and from a broad base of partners.

• Emergency Response and Recovery: In 2017 CRS assisted more than 12.4 million people through 201 projects in 55 countries, including humanitarian services to people displaced by both natural and man-made disasters—including war.

In collaboration with eight local partners, the SAFERR project - which stands for Shelter and Access for Empowerment and Risk Reduction- provides comprehensive support to refugee women and children in Greece, Bulgaria, Macedonia and Albania. In Athens, the CRS shelter team identifies buildings to rent and upgrade for some 60,000 refugees stranded in Greece.

• Agriculture: Our projects served more than 6.2 million people in 2017 through 124 projects in 53 countries.

Small-scale farmers in Africa are learning climate-smart techniques to cope with problems like drought and erratic rainfall, as well as innovative ways to store and protect their crops. In Latin America, our Borderlands project is connecting coffee farmers with international markets, ensuring they receive prices that recognize the value of their superior beans.

In Malawi, CRS led a nine-member consortium recognized in a recent study for increasing food security and resilience. The 5-year WALA program - Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement - featured community-led watershed restoration as the foundation for success. During the 2016-17 growing season, when severe drought affected the area requiring a major emergency food aid response. Despite the severity of the drought, 19 out of 24 communities implementing WALA did not require food assistance during the crisis.

• Health: We served more than 93 million beneficiaries in 2017 through 119 projects in 42 countries.

CRS has distributed more than 22 million insecticide-treated bed nets in The Gambia, Guinea and Niger. We've trained more than 5,500 people to share prevention messages, and we're working with our partners to deliver preventive malaria medication to more than 2.8 million children under age 5 in the Sahel. Our efforts have helped reduce The Gambia's malaria cases by 50 percent - putting us on track to eliminate malaria in The Gambia by 2020.

Our AIDS prevention and treatment work also focuses on children—a high-risk group. In Mufulira, Zambia, we're reaching out to families through multiple channels with the goal of enabling 300,000 more children living with HIV to receive antiretroviral therapy.

For more information about CRS, visit crs.org, crsespanol.org

Financials

Catholic Relief Services, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Catholic Relief Services, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/21/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Most Rev. Gregory Mansour

Bishop of the Eparchy of Saint Maron of Brooklyn (New York)

Mary Jane Creamer

Barrington, RI

Kevin Farrell

Farrell Mudd Development

Most Rev. George Lucas

Archbishop of Omaha (Nebraska)

Most Rev. Arthur Serratelli

Bishop of Paterson (New Jersey)

Charmaine Warmenhoven

Trustee, Catholic Foundation

Most Rev. Edward Burns

Bishop of Juneau (AK)

Patricia Dinneen

Senior Advisor, EMPEA

Most Rev. Felipe Estevez

Bishop of St. Augustine (FL)

Christopher Policinski

President and CEO, Land O'Lakes

Most Rev. Kevin Rhoades

Bishop of Ft. Wayne-South Bend (IN)

Most Rev. Thomas Wenski

Archbishop of Miami

Tom Arndorfer

Jesuit High School, Portland, OR

Monsignor J. Brian Bransfield

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Rise Jones Pichon

Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara

James Johnston

Bishop of Kansas City - St. Joseph (MO)

Jeri Eckhart Queenan

The Bridgespan Group

Mark Rauenhorst

Marren Properties, LLC

Joe Vasquez

Bishop of Austin, TX

Paul Coakley

Archbishop of Oklahoma City (OK)

Jermoe Listecki

Archbishop of Milwaukee (WI)

Gregory Parkes

Bishop of St. Petersburg (FL)

Stephen Walsh

Boulder, CO

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes