American Heart Association, Inc. HQ

aka AHA   |   Dallas, TX   |  http://www.heart.org/

Mission

The American Heart Association’s mission is to be a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. The organization’s goal is: Every person deserves the opportunity for a full, healthy life. As champions for health equity, by 2024, the American Heart Association will advance cardiovascular health for all, including identifying and removing barriers to health care access and quality. The Association is the nation's oldest, largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke, powered by over 32 million volunteers and supporters. The AHA is a leading funder and curator of heart and brain research; fights for public health policies; provides lifesaving tools and information; and creates science-based treatment guidelines to help ensure quality health care.

Ruling year info

1949

Chief Executive Officer

Nancy A. Brown

Main address

7272 Greenville Avenue

Dallas, TX 75231 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5613797

NTEE code info

Heart and Circulatory System (G43)

Professional Societies & Associations (E03)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world and stroke ranks second. Many other conditions, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, create risk for both diseases. Millions die too young or face disability. Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease combined. Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability. In addition to the emotional toll, these diseases cost Americans hundreds of billions of dollars. There has been great progress against these diseases since the Association’s founding in 1924. But not for everyone. Statistics show Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and Asian people often suffer disproportionately. The lack of health equity – the chance for all people to be healthy – is an urgent problem. Social factors, geography and race contribute to inequities. Many in rural America do not have access to medical resources. And the historical and systemic problems of structural racism drive health disparities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Science and Technology

The American Heart Association is the largest private not-for-profit funder of research into heart disease, stroke and related conditions.

This research investigates the causes, and seeks solutions to promote prevention and treatment for these diseases, with the aim of saving and improving lives. This work is crucial because heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world, and stroke is second. Over the years the Association has funded work by 14 Nobel Prize winners, and research leading to breakthroughs such as the first implantable pacemakers, the first artificial heart valve, CPR techniques and cholesterol-lowering medications. The organization has committed $100 million in new research aimed at removing barriers to health equity. The biggest investment so far is $20 million for the Health Equity Research Network on Prevention of Hypertension. Other key investments include nearly $5 million in new grants to research structural racism, health equity and health disparities.

Population(s) Served
Researchers
Women
Ethnic and racial groups
People with diseases and illnesses
Social and economic status

The American Heart Association provides lifesaving information and tools for patients, and helps people understand nutrition, exercise and health factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol.
The Association raises awareness with an expansive reach through media, advocacy, companies, , and million volunteers and supporters. Campaigns about smoking, vaping, maternal health, high blood pressure and COVID-19 vaccinations are key examples.
The Go Red for Women movement helps women understand heart disease is their greatest health threat, and the EmPOWERED to Serve initiative works for health equity through community-led health solutions in under-represented and under-resourced populations.
The organization trains over 23 million people in CPR annually. Hands-Only CPR kiosks have made it easy to learn and practice this lifesaving skill.
The Association’s CEO Roundtable is working for health equity by helping employers identify policies and procedures contributing to inequities.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Women
Ethnic and racial groups
Researchers
Social and economic status

The American Heart Association is the premier provider in quality, evidence-based science and continuing education for millions of health care professionals annually, primarily through training courses, peer-reviewed journals and scientific meetings.

The Association is the leader in resuscitation science, education and training, publishing CPR guidelines and training over 23 million health care professionals, caregivers and the public yearly.

Through 10 scientific conferences, including the flagship Scientific Sessions, attendees are eligible for Continuing Medical Education credits. CME credits also are available through a wide variety of online courses.

Thirteen revered scientific journals, including Circulation and Stroke, provide researchers, doctors and other medical professionals the latest in heart and brain science.
As an industry thought leader, the organization publishes scientific statements and clinical treatment guidelines for medical professionals.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
People with diseases and illnesses
Women
Social and economic status
Researchers

Work within communities – and led by people in communities – is crucial to the American Heart Association’s mission.
Through the National Hypertension Control Initiative, the organization helps educate health teams and engage under-resourced patients in communities across the country
Community-led solutions include investment in people and organizations who best understand the health needs where they live, empowering changes in nutrition insecurity, housing insecurity and more.

The Association leads nonpartisan advocacy campaigns supporting public policies. Advocating at the local, state and national levels has helped enact hundreds of measures including prevention of tobacco use, improved access to quality, affordable health care, and ensuring governments address communities’ health concerns.
The Association works with 2,500 hospitals across the country to help ensure health teams follow science-based treatment guidelines and trains over 23 million people in CPR annually.

Population(s) Served
Researchers
Women
People with diseases and illnesses
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of votes for or against specific policies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes implementation of policy changes at the state and local levels. Some of these include smoke-free ordinances, CPR in schools legislation, and additional taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The American Heart Association is striving to save lives, improve lives, and help to build a world free of heart disease and stroke in which all people have an equitable chance to be healthy.

This AHA pursues this vision by working toward this goal:

Every person deserves the opportunity for a full, healthy life. As champions for health equity, by 2024, the American Heart Association will advance cardiovascular health for all, including identifying and removing barriers to health care access and quality.

The organization has long pursued health equity, but the turmoil that brought historical inequities to the forefront in 2020 prompted an even more intense focus. Now the Association is working to achieve health equity through bold actions called the “10 Commitments.” The organization is investing over $200 million to fulfill them by 2024.

Here are highlights of the 10 Commitments. (Full text and progress toward this work can be found at heart.org/10.)

1. Investing $100 million in new research programs and grants focused on science-based solutions to health inequities and structural racism.

2. Raising and investing at least $100 million to invest in community-led solutions to address health inequity and structural racism.

3. Improving access to and the quality of health care for under-resourced populations and those in rural communities, as part of our focus on Medicaid expansion.

4. Leveraging our advocacy, science and news media enterprise against companies targeting individuals in disadvantaged communities with unhealthy products including sugary beverages and tobacco.

5. Launching, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a $121 million nationwide hypertension initiative to address a main source of poor cardiovascular health in Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous communities, funded by the federal government.

6. Using our extensive clinical registry programs to capture data and create new scientific knowledge on the health effects of social determinants of health and health care quality variances among racial and ethnic groups.

7. Collaborating with our CEO Roundtable to architect a road map, conceptual framework, and related tools for employers to identify and dismantle workplace practices and policies that contribute to structural racism and health inequities.

8. Creating a digital learning platform for clinicians, health professionals, and scientists with courses on issues of reversing structural racism and improving health equity.

9. Elevating the focus of our scientific journals on disparities, anti-racism, health equity, community engaged/community based participatory research and implementation science.

10. Increasing the diversity of our workforce, including leadership. We are committed to filling at least one-third of hires with diverse individuals.

The American Heart Association is following multiple strategies to reach the organization’s aggressive goal:

Every person deserves the opportunity for a full, healthy life. As champions for health equity, by 2024, the American Heart Association will advance cardiovascular health for all, including identifying and removing barriers to health care access and quality.

The Association measures the success of this aspirational goal by improvement in health equity in areas where major health impact can be achieved relatively quickly. These critical areas are:
• High blood pressure control
• Tobacco-free living (including vaping)
• Health care access
• Health care quality

Here is a closer look at each of these areas:
The centerpiece of the organization’s high blood pressure work is the National Hypertension Control Initiative. Through this $121 million initiative, in partnership with and funded by the federal government, the Association works with hundreds of health centers in communities around the country. These centers focus on evidence-based education for health teams and engaging under-resourced patients to control hypertension. In addition, the organization continues to fund research to learn more about high blood pressure, advocate for public policies that can help with hypertension control and spread awareness about the dangers of high blood pressure.

The Association has long worked for public policies banning tobacco and nicotine products, and continues to fund research into the health effects of smoking and vaping. The organization is now also more intensely and directly opposing companies that target people in disadvantaged communities with tobacco products (including e-cigarettes) that contain addicting flavors and menthol.

The Association continues to work toward improved access and quality of care for all, and particularly for under-resourced populations and people living in rural communities. This effort is part of the Association’s 50-state focus on Medicaid expansion. The organization’s advocacy and community resources are working to secure this coverage in all states lacking expanded access by 2024.

Another way quality of care will be improved is through the Association’s Get With The Guidelines® programs, which help health care professionals follow science-based approaches to treatment based on patient data registries. In place at about 2,500 hospitals across the country these quality-improvement programs have been proven to build health equity by eliminating or decreasing disparities in care and biases. The organization is using the patient registries (with no personal information disclosed) to capture data and create new scientific knowledge on the health effects of social determinants of health and health care quality variances among racial and ethnic groups. This data will be reported on regularly.

As the nation’s oldest, largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke, the American Heart Association has a nearly 100-year track record of saving and improving lives based on scientific expertise.

Since its founding in 1924, the Association has played a major role in important health developments – including the dramatic reduction of death rates from heart disease and stroke.

Powered by more than 32 million volunteers and supporters, and collaboration with major health organizations, the Association is a catalyst to achieving equitable health and well-being.

The Association is the largest private not-for-profit funder of research into heart disease and stroke – the leading causes of death. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization put its scientific expertise to work by urgently advancing research into this new disease.

The organization has funded work by 14 Nobel Prize winners, and breakthroughs such as the first implantable pacemakers, the first artificial heart valve and cholesterol-lowering medications. The organization drives dialogue through peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences.
.
The Association is the leader in resuscitation science, education and training, publishing CPR guidelines and training over 23 million people yearly.

The Association works with 2,500 hospitals to help health teams adhere to science-based treatment guidelines. When hospitals and doctor’s offices follow these programs, care becomes equitable for all patients.

Harnessing the power of its science leadership, the Association in 2021 committed $100 million in new research to remove barriers to health equity. That funding is for one of the Association’s “10 Commitments”—bold actions aiming to make health equity a reality.

The Commitments, with an investment of over $200 million to fulfill them by 2024, include work in communities, advocacy, awareness and beyond. The organization has long pursued health equity, but the turmoil that brought historical inequities to the forefront in 2020 prompted an even more intense focus.

One Commitment is a nationwide effort to control blood pressure, a main source of poor cardiovascular health in Black, Hispanic and Indigenous communities. The $121 million initiative, in partnership with and funded by the federal government, engages health centers around the country. The aim is to educate health teams and engage under-resourced patients.

Building healthier communities is key to health equity, which is why the Association funds community-led solutions. Through the Bernard J. Tyson Impact Fund and the Social Impact Fund, health solutions come from local entrepreneurs and organizations – who best understand a community’s health needs.

The Association advocates for public health at the local, state and federal levels. For over four decades the organization has supported hundreds of measures that have decreased public smoking, built healthier environments and much more.

As the largest not-for-profit funder of research into heart disease, stroke and related conditions, the American Heart Association has contributed greatly to major advances in the fight against devastating diseases.
Heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of death in the world, but since the Association’s founding in 1924 those death rates have declined dramatically. The organization has helped develop significant new treatments, helped ensured patients are treated with the best science-based treatments and protocols available and supported new laws protecting the public health.
The Association has funded work by 14 Nobel Prize winners, and research leading to breakthroughs such as the first implantable pacemakers, the first artificial heart valve, CPR techniques and cholesterol-lowering medications.
For more than four decades, the AHA has led nonpartisan advocacy campaigns in support of public policies that improve cardiovascular health. The Association has helped enact hundreds of polices that prevent tobacco use, increase federal funding for medical research and public health programs, improve access to quality health care and much more.
The Association has provided significant awareness and education to patients, consumers, businesses, health care professionals and scientists – thanks to its expansive reach through media, advocacy, companies, schools and a network of over 40 million volunteers and supporters. Campaigns about smoking and vaping, high blood pressure and COVID-19 vaccinations are key examples.
The Go Red for Women movement has helped women understand heart disease is their greatest threat, and the EmPOWERED to Serve initiative has provided community-led health solutions among under-represented and under-resourced populations. The Association has worked with 2,500 hospitals to help ensure health teams follow science-based treatment guidelines and trained over 23 million people in CPR annually.
What’s next? The American Heart Association will continue its work to save lives, improve lives, and help to build a world free of heart disease and stroke in which all people have an equitable chance to be healthy.
The Association is focusing on health equity – the condition that would exist if almoving toward alll people had having the opportunity to enjoy a healthy life. In fact, it’s the focus of the organization’s new goal: Every person deserves the opportunity for a full, healthy life. As champions for health equity, by 2024, the American Heart Association will advance cardiovascular health for all, including identifying and removing barriers to health care access and quality.
Work toward health equity will continue through bold actions called the “10 Commitments,” with over $200 million invested to fulfill them by 2024. Work toward these Commitments will include groundbreaking science, community-led solutions, aggressive advocacy for public health, quality health care initiatives, awareness, education and more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    As the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to a world of equitable heart and brain health for all, our mission serves a wide variety of people and organizations. We provide consumers and patients with lifesaving health information, programs to control blood pressure, CPR training and advocacy for healthy public policies in communities across the nation. We support scientists, researchers and medical teams through science-based treatment guidelines, research funding, professional education and scientific publishing. We serve hospitals through CPR instruction and evidence-based programs that improve the quality of health care. We serve businesses through workplace health information, and we serve educators and students through health-focused fundraising events.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our work within communities, in the science world and with women’s programs offer key examples of how we respond to feedback. Local teams seek local feedback about health needs regularly – and shift our work as merited. For instance, we increased our focus on nutrition security after receiving community feedback. The COVID-19 pandemic propelled our scientific conferences to shift to a virtual platform – while still providing best-in-class educational content and engagement. We improved these experiences after feedback from attendees. In our work for heart and brain health among women, we regularly seek feedback to shape our work and priorities. For example, we responded to a recent survey exploring women’s top health concerns by launching a research study focused on weight change in.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, researchers and scientists,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    People within communities are often in the best position to understand and address community problems. That’s why we invest in community ownership and solutions. The Social Impact Fund, Bernard J. Tyson Fund and the EmPOWERED To Serve™ Business Accelerator are examples of our support for community-led solutions. We also use feedback to develop content and platforms to reach women, as well as new areas of women’s health research. We’re investing in research focusing on increasing awareness among women in under-represented racial and ethnic groups, and the health impact of weight gain during menopause. We routinely adjust professional education offerings and scientific meetings based on feedback from participants, shaping the content as well as virtual and in-person options.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It can be difficult to understand the needs of those we have not served already. ,

Financials

American Heart Association, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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American Heart Association, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Raymond Vara

Donald Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM, FAHA

Marsha Jones

Michelle Albert, MD, MPH, FAHA

Bertram Scott

Mitchell Elkind, MD, MS, FAHA

Lee Shapiro

Mary Ann Bauman, MD

Regina Benjamin, MD, MBA

Douglas Boyle

Keith Churchwell, MD, FAHA

Shawn Dennis

Linda Gooden

Tom Greco

Ron Haddock

Robert Harrington, MD, FAHA

Joseph Loscalzo, MD, PhD, FAHA

Cheryl Pegus, MD, MPH

Ileana Pina, MD, FAHA

James Postal

Marcella Roberts, Esq

Jorge Saucedo, MD, MBA, FAHA

Lee Schwamm, MD, FAHA

Svati Shah, MD, MS, MHS, FAHA

John Warner, MD, FAHA

Thomas Windsor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/1/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.