Citizens Committee for Children of New York

Every Child Healthy, Housed, Educated and Safe

aka CCC   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.cccnewyork.org

Mission

Citizens' Committee for Children of New York (CCC) is a nonprofit and nonpartisan child advocacy organization. We educate and mobilize New Yorkers to work towards a city in which every New York City child is healthy, housed, educated and safe. CCC accomplishes its mission through three pillars: data analysis and research to better understand the issues facing children and identify community-driven solutions to address those needs; advocating for budgetary, legislative, and policy proposals that will improve the well-being of children and their families; and educating and mobilizing the public to become effective child advocates and active citizens. To remain an independent and honest broker among public and private stakeholders, CCC does not accept government funding.

Ruling year info

1945

Executive Director

Dr. Jennifer March PhD

Main address

14 Wall Street Suite 4E

New York, NY 10005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-5618593

NTEE code info

Children's Rights (R28)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (H01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the city endures unprecedented public health and economic crises, we are fully committed to ensuring that children, families, and communities’ needs are met, and that the City and its residents don’t just recover from these crises but thrive. We are focused on addressing risks that existed before the pandemic and are exacerbated now, including decreased engagement in well-child visits, immunization and early intervention; unprecedented unemployment levels especially for women and youth; learning loss and increased risk of child welfare involvement and domestic violence, among a host of known and emerging issues. This multitude of experiences are profoundly troubling, as children are particularly susceptible to trauma which can, when undiagnosed or untreated, have a life-long impact.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Every Child Healthy, Housed, Educated and Safe

CCC is a multi-issue child advocacy organization and covers the following areas, among others: child welfare; early childhood education, education; financial stability; health and mental health; healthy and affordable food;, housing and homelessness; juvenile justice; and youth services.

CCC accomplishes this mission through three pillars: research through the collection and analysis of administrative and qualitative data to understand and illustrate the issues facing 1.7 million New York City children and their families and communities; civic engagement through adult and youth child advocacy courses, peer to peer and organizational trainings, and work with the media; and policy, budget and legislative analysis and advocacy, including the leadership of issue-specific coalitions and campaigns.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of adult and youth trained through our unique advocacy and community leadership courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Every Child Healthy, Housed, Educated and Safe

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of youth and adults that participate in our Community Leadership Courses and our YouthAction program, including the number of youth reached by our youth peer trainers.

Number of media citations of advocate research or products

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Every Child Healthy, Housed, Educated and Safe

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Media hits that were direct quotes or the result of our organization providing background

Number of testimonies offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Every Child Healthy, Housed, Educated and Safe

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As New York City endures unprecedented public health and economic crises, we are fully committed to ensuring that children, families, and communities’ needs are met, and that the city and its residents don’t just recover from these crises but thrive. We are also committed to pandemic recovery efforts that confront the drivers of inequity and systemic racism, ensuring that all children, families, and communities have access to the infrastructure, support and services that are proven to promote equity, justice, and well-being.

In response to unprecedented challenges facing children and families, CCC’s policy and advocacy strategies across areas will continue to advance policy, regulation, legislation and budget proposals essential to recovery and mobility – advancing proposals that lift incomes; stabilize housing and increase affordable housing; promote high quality health, behavioral health and developmental supports; reconnect children to early care, youth services and education support to address learning loss; and strengthen primary preventive services in child welfare and youth justice.

CCC’s research and data will include reports that address inequities experienced by communities of color, as well as projects that leverage our established methods of community-based research to inform program development and design. We will build upon our Keeping Track Online database, which continues to be a platform to turn data users into advocates for New York’s children and families. We will also leverage findings from our participatory research projects last year, including our citywide, cellphone-based survey of youth and our citywide and statewide survey of child welfare providers, to inform budgetary, legislative, and policy advocacy during the coming program year. This will be supplemented by new participatory research projects with caregivers of young children in northern Manhattan, with household heads who have lived experience of housing insecurity and the shelter system, and with caregivers and service providers for whom child care enrollment has been impeded.

Our civic engagement will build public dialogue around the needs of New York City children, families and communities and mobilize New Yorkers around solutions that promote equity and well-being. We will continue our annual Community Leadership Course to help participants better understand the needs of children and families, and the systems and programs designed to address those needs; and our YouthAction programming, which will provide scaffolded opportunities for high school students to learn the tools of effective advocacy. Finally, CCC will develop new opportunities to host or participate in workshops, webinars, and other events to raise awareness of our data expertise and policy priorities, and host a series of convenings to engage New York’s key decision makers in discussions about child and family well-being and opportunities to advance equity and recovery for New York children and families.

As a multi-issue organization, dedicated to ensuring that every New York child is healthy, housed, educated and safe, CCC is optimally placed to explore the interconnected nature of the challenges and barriers facing children and families. As such it can address the root causes of inequity and illustrate how health, housing, education, safety, and economic conditions are intertwined for parents, children, and communities.

All of CCC’s activities are led by facts and data. We collect and analyze data sourced from city, state and federal agencies to produce reports, data resources, community needs assessments and advocacy briefs that deepen public understanding of how New York’s children are faring and what public policies are needed to reduce risk factors and improve mobility and well-being. Additionally, we undertake participatory data projects to better understand the lived experience of New York’s children and families in both the identification of needs and of solutions. These data put facts into the hands of policy makers, philanthropists, and direct service professionals and inform statewide, citywide, and community-specific opportunities for progress.

During the past year CCC has created a constant drumbeat of analysis and products that have driven public dialogue and influenced decisions made by city and state leaders.

At the city level, we successfully advocated to increase the value of rent subsidies, expand 3-K in every district, bring additional child care seats to communities most in need, and dramatically expand access to summer enrichment programming. Our advocacy with leaders in Albany helped to ensure that federal stimulus dollars and state investments were leveraged to protect and expand resources for behavioral health, housing supports, education, child care, cash aid, child welfare, and more.

We also ended the calendar year with several historic pieces of state legislation being enacted, including legislation that would:
· Raise the lower age of juvenile delinquency from seven to twelve, establish multiple services and programs for children, and provide New Yorkers who have been denied youthful offender status a chance to reapply.
· Alleviate the financial stress experienced by child care providers by streamlining the system for payments and requiring local districts to offer them a direct deposit option.
· Extend the term and expand the scope of the Child Care Availability Task Force charged with identifying opportunities to expand child care statewide.
· Create a Covered Lives assessment that would assess an annual fee from insurance providers who routinely reject Early Intervention claims. This will help increase supports available for young children with disabilities and their families.
· Establish a Child Poverty Reduction Advisory Council that would develop a plan to cut poverty in half in 10 years by evaluating, monitoring and expanding on statewide poverty reduction programs and initiatives.
· Continue the ability of Licensed Mental Health Practitioners to diagnose for behavioral health services, eliminate restrictions on telehealth services, and ensure credentialed and certified peers are reimbursed for telehealth services.

Financials

Citizens Committee for Children of New York
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Citizens Committee for Children of New York

Board of directors
as of 2/8/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Arlette Ferguson Mathis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2022,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.