QUEBEC LABRADOR FOUNDATION INC

Working Locally, Sharing Globally

aka QLF/Atlantic Center for the Environment   |   Ipswich, MA   |  https://www.qlf.org

Mission

The program mission of the Quebec-Labrador Foundation – U.S. (QLF) is defined in two parts: a regional component (New England and Eastern Canada), and an international component, which ties our regional model to a global network. QLF exists to promote global leadership development, to support the rural communities and environment of eastern Canada and New England, and to create models for stewardship of natural resources and cultural heritage that can be shared worldwide.

Ruling year info

1964

President & CEO

Elizabeth Alling

Main address

4 South Main St

Ipswich, MA 01938 USA

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EIN

13-6155399

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

International Exchanges (Q23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CONSERVATION AND STEWARDSHIP

In 2020, QLF’s Conservation and Stewardship Initiatives consist of the following programs and projects: 1) The Sounds Conservancy Marine Research Program; 2) Biodiversity Conservation Program with its projects, Aquatic Species At Risk, Habitat Stewardship for Species at Risk, Marine Bird Conservation; and Protected Areas Stewardship; 3) The National Park Service Stewardship Institute with its projects, Stewardship Today, New Parks/New Partnerships, and the Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network; 4) Conservation Exchange Programs to include the East Asia Conservation Exchange Program with Conservation Leaders from Mongolia and New England and The Great Flyways, A Middle East Conservation Exchange Program along the Rift Valley/Red Sea Flyways; and 5) The QLF Global Program with its projects to include Stewardship in Latin America, Privately Protected Areas with the International Union for Conservation of Nature, World Heritage Convention, Special Conservation Assignments, Special Edition on PARKS the International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation.

THE SOUNDS CONSERVANCY MARINE RESEARCH PROGRAM – The Sounds Conservancy is a marine research program along the six Sounds, estuaries, and coastal waters of southern New England and New York. From south to north, the Sounds are Long Island, Fishers Island, Block Island, Rhode Island, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket. The program is dedicated to conserve, protect, and steward the Sounds and its coastal waters, and to support marine research, environmental policy, and environmental education. Each year, QLF awards supplemental research grants to graduate students, Fellows, and practitioners in marine conservation. As well, each year, QLF staff update The Sounds Conservancy’s 200-page electronic publication, which documents twenty-five years of work by the program’s Fellows.

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION - QLF’s Biodiversity Conservation Program is managed by a Senior Program Consultant in Massachusetts with QLF staff members. The goals of the program are to encourage local communities to take an active role as citizen scientists, promote initiatives that secure sustainable development, steward and conserve ecosystems, and lead biodiversity conservation initiatives as a strategy to mitigate the impacts of a changing climate. 2020 projects are:

Aquatic Species at Risk – The Government of Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans awarded QLF a four-year grant secured by a QLF Senior Consultant who is recognized worldwide for her pioneering work in community-based conservation. The project contributes to the recovery of endangered and threatened marine species by reducing threats caused by fisheries such as entanglement with fishing gear, ingestion of plastics, and by-catch mortality.

Habitat Stewardship for Species at Risk – For a decade, QLF has been working with communities, fish harvesters to reduce threats to marine species such as accidental catch, entanglement in fishing gear, and ingestion of plastic debris. QLF works in collaboration with the fisheries in coastal communities to serve as stewards of marine ecosystems off Newfoundland and Labrador allowing for marine species to travel unencumbered by accidental catch and/or marine debris.

Marine Bird Conservation: Renewing Seabird Conservation on the Quebec North Shore – 2020 marks the first year of a two-year project, Marine Bird Conservation, which is managed by a Senior Consultant in Massachusetts. QLF launched this project in communities of the Quebec Lower North Shore, which is home to ten of Canada’s oldest migratory bird sanctuaries. Project goals are to engage residents in activities that protect the important seabird colonies along the Coast and raise awareness of threats to nesting colonies of seabirds and sea ducks.

Protected Areas Stewardship: Conservation and Stewardship of Ecologically Significant Species in New Brunswick’s Protected Areas – The goal of the Protected Areas Stewardship Program is the conservation and stewardship of protected areas in New Brunswick. The program, managed by QLF staff at the Headquarters, is directed in partnership with the Nature Trust New Brunswick, a charitable land conservation organization dedicated to the conservation and stewardship of 60 nature preserves of ecological significance throughout the province, QLF staff contribute to surveys and longitudinal studies of seabirds, sea ducks, and migratory birds as well as flora and fauna across New Brunswick’s protected areas.

THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE STEWARDSHIP INSTITUTE – QLF is the principal partner in the National Park Service Stewardship Institute, which was founded with the conviction that the National Park Service (NPS) has a great public purpose and that its people – charged with the stewardship of some of America’s greatest treasures – should be supported, challenged, and provided opportunities for renewal. Projects consist of the following.

Stewardship Today – QLF staff guided new initiatives under a banner of “Stewardship Today” to include plans for the 250th anniversary of the United States in 2026.

New Parks/New Partnerships – QLF staff and the Stewardship Institute have been working with new-park superintendents and regional staff to define lessons learned on the establishment of new parks and partnerships.

Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network – QLF began a new initiative to develop a strategic plan for the Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network to include parks, wildlife refuges, maritime museums, historic sites and water trails.

CONSERVATION EXCHANGE PROGRAMS – Conservation Exchange Programs foster an exchange of knowledge, experience, conservation and innovation across borders while promoting cross-border, international cooperation between communities and regions worldwide. International Fellows who have participated in QLF’s Conservation Exchanges represent 75 countries and six regions worldwide.

East Asia Conservation Exchange Program with Conservation Leaders from Mongolia and New England – In early 2020, QLF made arrangements to lead the second East Asia Conservation Exchange Program in Mongolia for practitioners from New England and Mongolia representing the public and private sector. This exchange was postponed until travel restrictions are released and until it is safe to travel.

The Great Flyways, A Middle East Conservation Exchange Program on the Rift Valley/Red Sea Flyways – Since 1992, QLF has directed Exchange Programs for conservation leaders from the Middle East, North Africa, and the Gulf States. A focus of the program is the environment, which serves as a bridge to mutual understanding and collaboration across borders, political boundaries, and cultural frameworks. In early 2020, QLF planned for a second Conservation Exchange Program on the Great Flyways to be held on the Rift Valley/Red Sea Flyways in Jordan. The program is postponed until it is deemed safe to travel.

QLF GLOBAL PROGRAM – The QLF Global Program consists of special assignments that promote innovative solutions for local and regional environmental challenges shared worldwide. Projects are:

Stewardship in Latin America – QLF continues to share its model of community-based conservation and stewardship of natural resources throughout Latin America through workshops and initiatives that advance strategic conservation objectives.

Privately Protected Areas with the International Union for Conservation of Nature – QLF’s Senior Vice President chairs a Specialist Group of the World Commission on Protected Areas within the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Its noted publication, Guidelines for Privately Protected Areas, written in collaboration with a QLF staff member, is central to a global effort to conserve privately protected areas. In 2020, and with support from a German Agency, QLF is implementing a series of training workshops, based on the guidelines for privately protected areas.

World Heritage Convention – QLF’s Senior Vice President serves as an advisor to the World Heritage Convention, which recognizes sites of Outstanding Universal Value, and to consult on the governance of sites. The Convention is managed by UNESCO.

Special Conservation Assignments QLF’s Senior Vice President serves on numerous international bodies including the Protected Landscapes Specialist Group; Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy of the International Union for Conservation of Nature; and the joint task force with the Species Survival Commission and Commission on Environmental Law.

Special Edition of PARKS, the International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation – QLF Senior Vice President is co-editing a special issue of PARKS, the International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation, on the impact and implication of SARS-CoV-2 on conservation areas.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Older adults
First Nations of Canada
Multiracial people

Conservation Internship Program – The Conservation Internship Program is managed by staff from the Headquarters in Massachusetts. As conservation leadership is among QLF’s highest priorities and has historically been a hallmark of our programs, QLF invests in the next generation of environmental leaders who are undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals. Each year, QLF supports up to 24 Interns who represent academic institutions worldwide and who are assigned to programs in QLF’s home region: Maritimes, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Quebec North Shore along the Gulf of St. Lawrence; and New England. Internships provide hands-on, experiential training, and field work in Biodiversity Conservation, Marine Bird Conservation, Conservation and Stewardship of Marine Environments, Privately Protected Areas, and Wildlife Conservation. Internships are often directed in partnership with multiple organizations in-region.

Internships based at QLF Headquarters in Ipswich, Massachusetts, focus on communications, new regional and global initiatives, and special conservation assignments. QLF provides an array of experiential learning that often result in a transformative experience lasting a lifetime. The philanthropic impact of the program stretches far beyond a summer, the semester, or the year. Supporting the Conservation Internship Program is an investment in the next generation’s conservation leaders and stewards of our environment.

Investing in the Next Generation’s Conservation Leaders – Based in Massachusetts, QLF manages a three-year program, Investing in the Next Generation’s Conservation Leaders across the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland and Southern Labrador. Throughout the year, staff provide Environmental Education Workshops to more than 300 youth and teachers across the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland and southern Labrador. The program is designed to inspire youth as the next generation leaders. Workshops focus on the impact of climate change on biodiversity conservation; seabirds, sea ducks, and migratory birds; marine mammals at risk; reducing marine debris and restoring marine ecosystems; protection of wildlife and their habitats. This program is managed with several partners in Newfoundland and Southern Labrador.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
First Nations of Canada

Special Projects are managed by QLF President and President Emeritus and consist of research for new conservation programs and initiatives both in-region and overseas; new public/private conservation partnerships; new conservation consulting assignments in-region; and a Strategic Program Plan for the next three years. Special Projects advance the organization’s mission with its current focus on Biodiversity Conservation as a strategy to build resilience in a changing climate. In addition, QLF’s President Emeritus is writing a series of articles and essays on the history of the organization, program accomplishments, and many of the organization’s constituents that have been and continue to be prominent and influential conservation leaders.

Population(s) Served
Adults
First Nations of Canada
Multiracial people

QLF’s Culture and Heritage Program is managed from the Headquarters in Massachusetts. As the organization’s program mission is focused on Biodiversity Conservation, the Culture and Heritage Program becomes less prominent. In the first months of 2020, a program staff member completed the final reports of the recently completed program. In addition, a QLF Senior Consultant managed the Culture and Heritage project, which consisted of a theatrical production on cultural and natural heritage preservation on the Quebec North Shore.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Young adults
Seniors
Older adults
People of European descent

In 2020, QLF established new media and communications to include a webinar series, Voices of QLF, which is broadcast once a month and highlights the accomplishments of Staff and Alumni who are prominent conservation leaders in-region and worldwide. This series is a significant program requiring the time and resources of several staff and communications consultants.

Other communications include the QLF website, social media, and electronic news, online reports and publications. QLF staff continue to write a series of articles documenting the work of QLF’s Global Leadership Network of Alumni and write case studies on the longitudinal studies conducted by staff and Alumni. Articles and Case Studies are posted on the QLF website under the section, Our Impact. Analytics indicate that QLF media and communications are successful with a dramatic increase in viewers.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Older adults
Seniors
First Nations of Canada
Multiracial people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The program mission of the Quebec-Labrador Foundation – U.S. (QLF) is defined in two parts: a regional component (New England and Eastern Canada), and an international component, which ties our regional model to a global network. QLF exists to promote global leadership development, to support the rural communities and environment of eastern Canada and New England, and to create models for stewardship of natural resources and cultural heritage that can be Community-based Biodiversity Conservation programs serve adults, students and youth. Based in Ipswich, Massachusetts, we serve communities in Montréal, Québec; Newfoundland and Labrador; and the Maritimes. QLF shares it's model of Biodiversity Conservation across the globe.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    QLF switched from in-person to online youth conservation programs in Harrington Harbour this year because parents and guardians were concerned about outsiders bringing Covid-19 into their remote community in Quebec, Canada. In the past year QLF has amended Regional Biodiversity Conservation Programs and International Conservation Exchange Programs to include work in the field and work directed remotely in compliance with Federal, State and Provincial directives.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

QUEBEC LABRADOR FOUNDATION INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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QUEBEC LABRADOR FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 6/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms Clare McMorris -- Board Chair, QLF - U.S.


Board co-chair

Mr. Philip Nadeau-- Board Chairman, QLF -Canada

Bayard Brokaw

U.S. Board

Clare McMorris

U.S. Board

Rev. Edward Miller, Jr.

U.S. Board

Frederick Moseley IV

U.S. Board

Susan Peck

U.S. board

Ernest Tracy III

U.S. Board

Jo-Ann Watson

U.S. Board

Elizabeth Alling

U.S. & Canadian Board

Rosemary Furfey

U.S. Board

Lawrence Morris

U.S & Canadian Board

Miller Ayre

Canadian Board

Patricia Middleton

Canadian Board

Stephen Molson

Canadian Board

Kirby Nadeau

Canadian Board

Philip Nadeau

Canadian Board

John Rae

Canadian Board

Bonnie Struthers

Canadian Board

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/19/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.