The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region

Strengthening our Community through Philanthropy

aka Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region, Inc.   |   Albany, NY   |  http://www.cfgcr.org

Mission

The mission of the Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region is to strengthen our community through philanthropy. We do this in collaboration with donors and community partners who share our vision for community transformation through stewardship of charitable endowments, superior donor services, effective grantmaking, and leadership to address community needs.

Ruling year info

1968

President and CEO

Mr. John Eberle

Main address

Two Tower Place

Albany, NY 12203 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Community Foundation for the Capital Region

EIN

14-1505623

NTEE code info

Community Foundations (T31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1968, the Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region has worked to improve the quality of life in the region by promoting and facilitating effective philanthropy. Our success is directly related to our generous donors who invest through the Community Foundation in our area’s most effective nonprofit organizations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SCHOLARSHIPS

The Community Foundation offers a number of scholarships, established by donors to help others realize their dream of an education. Most scholarships benefit students from the Capital Region. Unless otherwise noted, scholarships are paid directly to the institution in which the student is enrolled. Enrollment and good academic standing are verified each semester prior to the release of scholarship funds. Award amounts are determined annually, based on the Foundation?s Spending Policy.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region grants funds from a collection of 400+ different charitable funds and many different channels. Each year, the Foundation awards nearly $5 million in grants to nonprofit organizations and scholarships to local students.

While the majority of the Foundation's grantmaking focuses on the communities of New York's greater Capital Region, we award grants to nonprofit organizations across the United States and internationally, in partnership with our donors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

As part of its mission, the Community Foundation for the Greater Capital provides leadership to address community needs by engaging a broad array of residents and leaders in all fields in philanthropy and supporting the not-for-profit sector through a variety of initiatives. We are delighted to work with many individuals and organizations to help them meet their charitable goals and, in turn, help thousands of nonprofit organizations carry on their good work.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Foundations Accredited

National Standards for US Community Foundation Accreditation 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Grants for Nonprofit Organizations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2020 was an extraordinary year in philanthropy and our Foundation and fund advisors answered the call of the nonprofits on the front lines, distributing more than $1M in immediate relief grants.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Grants for Nonprofit Organizations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Total number of gifts to the Foundation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Total dollar amount of gifts to the Foundation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Foundation received final payments of more than $11.6M in Q4 2021 to complete the funding of the Hortense and Louis Rubin Community Health Fund.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Community Foundation empowers nonprofits organizations, philanthropists, business leaders, and public officials to build a region that benefits everyone. We do this by partnering and sharing advice with donors, mentoring nonprofits, convening leaders, and in our own grantmaking. As the region continues to grow, our goal is to expand our impact and partners to benefit the quality of life in our entire region.

The Foundation is the center of overlapping partnerships and networks of generous and dedicated people, working together to make life better in our region. We provide high-impact, flexible giving opportunities for donors, major funding for nonprofits and scholarships for students, and leadership around key community issues.

The Community Foundation is governed by a Board of Directors and staffed by a small team of local experts, representing diverse backgrounds, interests, and professional expertise. Foundation staff members are community and philanthropic experts that work closely with donors, grantees, community leaders, government agencies, and businesses to ensure the Community Foundation effectively meets community needs.

The Community Foundation’s assets currently total more than $110 million. These charitable assets are professionally managed to safeguard principal and yield a competitive rate of return. Oversight of endowed assets is provided by a volunteer Investment Committee which includes top financial and investment experts.

Since 1968, the Foundation has awarded over $100M in grants and scholarships and maintains over $110M in assets under our care. In addition, the Community Foundation continues to lead, support and participate in several regional level initiatives that are changing the game for the Greater Capital Region. These include the Upstate Alliance for the Creative Economy, Capacity Building Training and Grants for Nonprofits, Green and Healthy Homes Initiative, partner with local private foundations, regional community healthcare initiatives with the Hortense and Louis Rubin Community Health Fund, the local Community Indicators, and the Capital Region Coalition to End Homelessness.

In 2019, the Community Foundation launched a partnership with the Institute for Nonprofit Leadership and Community Development at the University at Albany to conduct an assessment of nonprofit board diversity and inclusion throughout the Greater Capital Region. The goal of the assessment was to understand current demographics, identify organizations with policies and procedures related to diversity, and evaluate attitudes around diversity. The report identified challenges nonprofits face when recruiting a diverse pool of candidates and recognized the obstacles community members of diverse communities encounter when serving on boards.

Focused on the assessment’s key findings, the Community Foundation convened community stakeholders to share the findings and identify actionable next steps. In August 2020, the Foundation created and convened the Capital Region Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Action (IDEA) Collaborative – a steering committee comprised of diverse community experts looking to tackle the issue of diversity on nonprofit boards. The IDEA Collaborative led the Foundation through three key equity initiatives in 2020/2021:
1. The Catalysts for Change Leadership Program, an 8-week board development series that will focus on increasing inclusiveness and diversity on nonprofit boards.
2. The Nonprofit Board Inclusion Series, a 3-part training series on creating inclusive and welcoming cultures representative of diverse, traditionally underrepresented communities. The series was tailored to current nonprofit leaders looking to foster inclusive leadership within their organizations.
3. The Foundation conducted a survey; inviting nonprofit organizations to share their information to be included on a list of IDEA-committed organizations seeking to increase diversity on their boards. The listing is a user-friendly and up-to-date Google spreadsheet that can be downloaded and sorted to suit the user’s needs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Fund Advisors Nonprofit Community Community Partners Scholarship Students

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Open an ongoing dialogue with our constituents has been a fundamental part of our work.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2019, the Community Foundation launched a partnership with the Institute for Nonprofit Leadership and Community Development at the University at Albany to conduct an assessment of nonprofit board diversity and inclusion throughout the Greater Capital Region. Through this assessment, the Foundation convened regional leaders to form the Inclusion, Diversity, Equity & Action (IDEA) Collaborative. In partnership with the Community Foundation, the IDEA Collaborative developed programming to address three issues highlighted in the report: Lack of diversity on nonprofit boards, creating welcoming spaces for board and executive leadership from diverse communities and connecting interested individuals with board service opportunities.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By soliciting feedback, we have empowered those we serve to feel more involved in our decision-making, particularly when it comes to our Community Leadership Initiatives and how we utilize our discretionary resources. We have seen increased dialogue and open, ongoing conversation about how to best service our community.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region

Board of directors
as of 03/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Egan

Capital Region Chamber

Term: 2020 - 2022

Jessica Brand, Esq.

Bethlehem Central Community Foundation

Kevin O'Bryan

Community Leader

Jan Smith

Castle Rock Ranch Group

Mark Eagan

Capital Region Chamber of Commerce

Robert Hennes

Hugh Johnson Advisors

Alicia Lasch

Adirondack Funds

Murray Massry

Tri-City Rentals

Chet Opalka

John Rodat

Public Signals, LLC.

James Sidford

Austin & Co., Inc.

Frank Slingerland

The Freddie Institute

Christopher Cimijotti

Marvin and Company

Eileen McLoughlin

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Robert Reynolds

Whiteman, Osterman & Hanna

Dorcey Applyrs, Dr.PH.

City of Albany

Belinda Hilton

Business Council of New York State, Inc.

Meaghan Murphy, Esq.

Lavelle & Finn, LLP.

Fran'Cee Brown-McClure, Ph.D.

Union College

Robert Audi, CPA

Community Leader

David Craft, Esq.

Albany Law School

Aimee Dake

AIM Services

Heidi Knoblauch, Ph.D.

University at Albany & Plumb Oyster Bar

Cecil Stodghill

Doane Stuart School

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.