LUNG CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Living. Breathing. Science.

aka LCRF   |   New York, NY   |  https://www.lcrf.org/

Mission

The mission of the Lung Cancer Research Foundation is to improve lung cancer outcomes by funding research for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Dennis Chillemi

Main address

501 Seventh Avenue Suite 401

New York, NY 10018 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

14-1935776

NTEE code info

Private Grantmaking Foundations (T20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Despite the fact that lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, it receives far less funding than other types of cancer. The Lung Cancer Research Foundation (LCRF) is helping to close this gap, bringing hope to people with lung cancer. LCRF’s mission is to improve lung cancer outcomes by funding research for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer. Lung cancer research has made steady progress over the past decade, leading to improved patient outcomes. Through the notable achievements of our investigators and our diverse portfolio of scientific research projects, LCRF has contributed to this remarkable progress. We are at a pivotal time to accelerate support for research across all areas of unmet need. The progress being made is remarkable and is resulting in increased survival rates for certain lung cancer patients. Through our investments in scientific research, we are well on our way to bringing these improvements to all lung cancer patients.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Scientific Grant Program

Despite being the leading cause of cancer mortality, lung cancer receives far less research funding per death. Lung cancer receives $2,462 per death compared to breast cancer at $16,405, prostate cancer at $7,469, and pancreatic cancer at $4,326. That is why funding from non-governmental organizations is so critical. The Lung Cancer Research Foundation (LCRF) plays a pivotal role in this funding landscape, supporting early-career investigators who, if not for our funding, may not receive funding at all.

Since 2005, The Lung Cancer Research Foundation, and its progenitor organizations, has been committed to funding cutting edge research that transforms the lung cancer treatment landscape. When we first opened our doors, our mission was simple: provide hope by funding the best research and help bring it to people. We have been wildly successful. In 15 years, we have become one of the largest private funders of lung cancer research— enabling earlier detection, deeper understanding of the mechanisms that allow lung cancer to form, and new and expanded treatment options that have saved many lives. Simultaneously, our Scientific Advisory Board has become one of the preeminent bodies in the lung cancer research community. Furthermore, our investment in early career investigators continues to allow new talent to thrive and grow in the space as is demonstrated through follow-on funding many have received since receiving their LCRF grant.

To date, LCRF has provided 383 research grants totaling nearly $36 million, the largest amount provided by a non-governmental organization dedicated to funding lung cancer research. The support within the patient community, researchers, strategic partners, and industry partners is key to our present successes as well as achieving our future vision to find an eventual cure for lung cancer.

During 2020 we funded eight (8) research grants for two years at $150,000 each. Four (4) research grants were funded through the LCRF Pilot Grant Program which funds innovative projects across the full spectrum of basic, translational, clinical, epidemiological, health services, and research focused on a myriad of topics. The projects funded span three countries and topics including:
• Identifying risk factors for lung cancer predisposition through systematic evaluation of environmental carcinogens’ activation by the respiratory tract microbiota
• SNF2 Histone Linker PHD RING Helicase as a novel tumor suppressor gene and risk factor in lung adenocarcinoma development
• Targeting the IL-1beta pathway for lung cancer treatment
• Targeting APOBEC3A induction as a new therapeutic strategy to prevent acquired drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.
An additional four (4) research grants were funded through the LCRF Disparities in Lung Cancer Program which funds research that addresses certain disparities that include but are not limited to race and gender-dependent differences; social and biological risk factors; never smokers; equity and access to health care; and impacts of geography, age, and socioeconomic status on outcomes. The projects funded span two countries and topics including:
• Development of risk prediction models to ensure equitable eligibility for lung cancer screening in minority populations
• Understanding the immune landscape of non-small cell lung cancer in African Americans
• Contributions of tobacco exposure, NNK, and stress to lung cancer risk disparities between AA and CA male smokers
• Determining differences in immunotherapy outcomes and immunobiology in African American patients with NSCLC.
In addition to the direct research funding provided through the LCRF pilot and LCRF disparities grant tracks, the foundation is currently administrating research partnerships with Pfizer Global Medical Grants and the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

The LCRF and Pfizer Global Medical collaboration to fund over $1 million in research grants through a Competitive Research Grant Program was started in 2019 and will continue through 2021. The research grant opportunity focused on understanding ways to improve clinical practices for side effect management for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving targeted therapies. This is the first collaboration of its kind in lung cancer and could have an impact on patient care. The collaboration between LCRF and Pfizer funded four (4) research grants covering topics such as:
• Real-time monitoring and modeling of symptoms and adverse events in lung cancer patients receiving oral targeted therapies for tumors with oncogenic driver mutations
• Development and implementation of 4R care sequences in patients with NSCLC receiving targeted therapies
• Implementation strategies for monitoring adherence in real-time (iSMART)
• Proactive monitoring of treatment-related adverse events through a mobile application in NSCLC patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors: the “Empower Me” Digital Therapeutic Study.
LCRF’s partnership with the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC) dates back to 2011 covering three clinical trials. The LCMC2 clinical trial enrolled 1,000 patients via a network of fourteen (14) notable domestic clinical research sites. The clinical trial studied the Impact of Smoking and TP53 Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients with Targetable Mutations. The LCMC3 clinical trial began in 2017 and has enrolled 1,000 patients via a network of five (5) domestic clinical research sites. LCMC3 is designed as a neoadjuvant and adjuvant trial of immune checkpoint blockade for stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Final reporting from this clinical trial should be completed in alter 2021 or early 2022. Launched in late 2020, LCMC4 will be a study of 1,000 patients via a network of 25+ domestic clinical research sites. The goal of the clinical trial is to determine the feasibility of comprehensive molecular profiling to detect actionable oncogenic drivers in patients with suspected early-stage lung cancers scheduled to undergo biopsies to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer.

In 2020, our research investment was funded without the need for deficit spending, and we are poised to grow our research investment in the coming years.

Population(s) Served

PATIENT EDUCATIONAL PORTFOLIO
The overall goal of the Lung Cancer Research Foundation (LCRF)’s Patient Educational Portfolio is to provide relevant and accurate information on lung cancer using patient-friendly language. Patients and caregivers need information at all steps in the continuum of care, from diagnosis through treatment and beyond. The Lung Cancer Research Foundation has a portfolio of educational resources to help patients and their families better understand lung cancer and learn about their treatment options. Helping patients to understand new treatments and the hope offered by these treatment advances are key objectives of our educational materials. We also have materials designed to educate the public about the magnitude of lung cancer as a health care problem and ways to identify symptoms of the disease.

In 2020, LCRF distributed over 70,000 educational materials to lung cancer patients, caregivers, advocates and healthcare professionals across the nation in both print and digital format. Our website also contains links to information and resources, which receives on average over 10,000 unique impressions annually. Our continued goal is to steadily increase our materials distributed, particularly with digital downloads as there has been a surge in demand for readily available information.

The key objectives of the portfolio are to:
• Increase awareness in the general public on the risks of lung cancer and lung cancer screening
• Increase patient and caregiver education on lung cancer treatment options for NSCLC and SCLC
• Engage patients and caregivers in discussion of lung cancer research and its influence on screening, treatment advances, and health outcomes
The Patient Educational Programs Review Committee (PEPRC) assists in the evaluation of materials used for LCRF’s patient support and educational programs, awareness campaigns, and other patient-facing initiatives. The PEPRC consists of multidisciplinary experts such as oncologists, researchers, nurses, social workers, and lung cancer patients/survivors. PEPRC also aids in shaping the overall strategy by lending their respective expertise in the field.

The Patient Educational Portfolio is also crafted with assistance from the feedback we receive from our community. Our materials are rated on average a 4.6/5 according to the feedback collected from individuals who download or order our print materials on our website. Sample feedback includes:

Thank you for providing free educational resources. I am a Thoracic Nurse Navigator and provide these to all of my lung cancer patients. My patients like and appreciate them very much.

Thank you so much for providing information to people trying to navigate a lung cancer diagnosis and all the stress related to the entire process.

My mother was recently diagnosed with lung cancer. Very heartbreaking and a surprise to us all. Heard nothing but good reviews about LCRF so I look forward to learning about everything and I appreciate what you all do.

LUNG CANCER SUPPORT LINE

Our Lung Cancer Support Line is a toll-free number (844)-835-4325, is available to anyone affected by lung cancer, primarily lung cancer patients and caregivers. The Support Line operates Monday-Friday 9am-5pm ET and is equipped with extensive and up-to-date resource guides for common needs and services for lung cancer patients such as financial assistance, transportation or lodging to/from medical appointments, support groups, and much more. Lung cancer patients and their caregivers may call or email the program as often as they wish, and the service is offered free of charge. The Lung Cancer Support Line helps fill an unmet need by providing personalized, one-on-one support to callers who are facing the challenges of lung cancer.

In 2020, we assisted over 400 lung cancer patients and caregivers through the Support Line. Approximately half of which are newly diagnosed patients or caregivers of those who are recently diagnosed, proving that the Support Line provides a timely service for those seeking support. The remainder of support line inquiries come in from healthcare institutions or community-based institutions looking for resources for their patients. Our continued goal for the Support Line is to strengthen our communication with those who are newly diagnosed and engaged in our educational programs. We also hope to increase our Support Line reach by 20% over the next year via targeted outreach and promotion of our services. Through the Support Line, we provide:

• A central hub for accessing emotional support, patient-specific local and national resources
• Accurate and up-to-date educational information and materials
• Patient/caregiver opportunities to connect with others through a peer matching program
• Engagement opportunities within the LCRF lung cancer community

#TOGETHERSEPARATELY SERIES

Lung cancer awareness, education, and advocacy suffers in comparison to some other diseases because of the poor prognosis as well as the stigma patients may face given the association with smoking. Advances in treatments, however, have given patients and caregivers new hope and many are interested in joining together to “make a difference” in their own lung cancer journey as well as in their broader community.

An important component of the #TogetherSeparately live virtual series is the ability of patients/survivors and caregivers to connect and re-connect with others who are living with lung cancer. We want patients to know that they are not alone and that we are working to support the lung cancer community. This live meeting format gives hope to participants through the opportunity to meet lung cancer researchers and speak to researchers about their concerns and needs. These needs became even more evident with the onset of the COVID-19 global pandemic in March 2020 that shaped the way we live and receive medical care. Many lung cancer patients expressed their feelings of isolation and desire for updates on current lung cancer and COVID-19 related information. This inspired the series to provide both a connect with the broader lung cancer community as well as to learn more about lung cancer related topics. By the end of each event in the series, new friendships have formed, information has been exchanged, and everyone—including us—leaves energized and inspired.

The learning objectives of the live virtual series are:
• Learn the fundamentals of lung cancer and treatment options
• Understand why funding research is crucial for the development of new therapies for patients
• Learn about programs and resources available to the lung cancer community

Since its inception in March 2020, we had almost 2,000 individuals register for at least one of our #TogetherSeparately events with an average attendance record of 40-60 individuals per webinar. The majority of the attendees in this series are lung cancer patients, survivors, advocates, caregivers, and community providers. Our goal is to continue the series and provide 10-12 webinars annually on a variety of topics related to living with lung cancer.

We also have a companion #TogetherSeparely Support Group on Facebook where constituents can deepen their connections with each other and have regular informational posts and resources shared with them. Currently, the Facebook group has 376 members and continues to grow every month. This active group has a steady engagement rate between 60-65% and we hope to grow this group to up to 800 members by the end of 2021.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

LUNG CANCER MUTATION CONSORTIUM 2008

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of research studies funded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Scientific Grant Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Median grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Scientific Grant Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Scientific Grant Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Scientific Grant Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Health

Related Program

Patient Education & Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

LCRF is a nonprofit organization that provides critical funding to innovative research around the world focused on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of lung cancer. Through the Scientific Grant Program, LCRF supports the best and brightest researchers at universities and cancer centers throughout the country. Our grant platform is recognized as one of the most prestigious in the lung cancer field and is guided by an advisory panel of the country’s leading experts across all dimensions of research including lab based and clinical. he Foundation is committed to growing the grant program to help fuel the breakthroughs of tomorrow and fund more research with the potential to improve lung cancer outcomes.

The overall goal of the LCRF Scientific Grant Program is to fund innovative, high-reward research across the spectrum of basic, clinical, and translational research that has the potential to extend survival and quality of life for people with lung cancer.

Our Scientific Grant Program support enables researchers with groundbreaking, innovative ideas and paves the way for follow-on funding from sources such as the National Cancer Institute (NCI)/National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Cancer Society.

The LCRF Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), comprised of renowned multi-disciplinary scientists and physicians, ensures that the most promising research is funded across a variety of topics including:
• Improved understanding of lung cancer biology
• Prevention and screening for early detection
• Identification of new biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies
• Development of more effective and less toxic therapies
• Psychosocial research including supportive measures for people with lung cancer and their families
• Quality of care and outcomes research

LCRF’s Scientific Advisory Board includes renowned scientists, physicians and thought leaders spanning a broad range of disciplines in lung cancer research. Many of the members are also affiliated with leading cancer centers in the United States.

The Scientific Advisory Board leverages its collective experience and expertise to maintain the objectivity of LCRF’s grant selection process and help ensure that the Foundation continues to fund innovative, high-reward research that might otherwise go uninvestigated.

To date, LCRF has funded 394 research grants, totaling nearly $39 million, the highest amount provided by a nonprofit organization dedicated to funding lung cancer research.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve lung cancer patients, caregivers, medical professionals, and researchers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, We provide and [email protected] email address,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In response to the growing numbers of African Americans being diagnosed with lung cancer, we partnered with the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) to develop a series of patient education materials aimed specifically towards the African American community. The materials included a printed booklets that was distributed to many of the churches in the AME network and produced a public service announcement with Jesse Owens grandson urging members of the African American community to be screened for lung cancer. We also decided to continue our #Together Separately webcast/Town Hall meetings series. These virtual meetings started at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic to bring together lung cancer patients and are now a permanent part of our mission.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    LCRF has always been a leader in funding lung cancer research and in recent years we have become a trusted source of information for the entire lung cancer community. We have worked very hard over the last three years to strengthen our relationships with lung cancer patients, caregivers, medical professionals, funders, and researchers.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

LUNG CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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LUNG CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 3/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Reina Honts

Mary Ann Tighe

Joan Schiller, MD

Aaron Tighe

Raymond Chalmé

Peter Fry

Jill Furman

Ronald Sernau

Rose Ann Weinstein

Katerina Politi

Brendon Stiles

Bruce Dunbar

Scott Morris

Coleen Conner-Ziegler

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.