Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

Kupenda for the Children

Equipping children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential

aka KFTC   |   Hampton, NH   |  www.kupenda.org

Mission

Our Mission: Kupenda (“love” in Kiswahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through advocacy, education, and medical intervention Our Vision: A fully integrated society where people of all abilities have access to health, education, and a loving community.

Ruling year info

2003

Founder and Executive Director

Ms Cynthia Rose Bauer

Kupenda's Co-founder and Kenyan Executive Director

Mr. Leonard Mbonani

Main address

Kupenda for the Children P.O. Box 473

Hampton, NH 03843 USA

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EIN

16-1644867

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The WHO estimates that over one billion people (or about 15% of the world’s population) are living with disabilities world-wide; 10% percent of these are children under the age of 15 and 80% live in developing nations. Among marginalized groups, children with disabilities remain the most excluded, discriminated not only because of their disability but also because of lack of understanding and knowledge about its causes, implications and stigma. In numerous countries, the majority of people do not expect children with disabilities to be productive members of society and believe they have been cursed by witchcraft or God. Others see disability resulting from sin, incest, contraception use, demon possession, infidelity, thorns, etc. These beliefs often lead families to mistreat children with disabilities by hiding, neglecting, abandoning or abusing them. Some of these children are even murdered at birth.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

Children with disabilities have the right to education without discrimination. Nevertheless, many remain excluded from equal access to schooling. This means they also miss out on many of the benefits that follow, including better jobs, social and economic security, and opportunities for full participation in society.Kupenda works with parents, leaders and communities to support children with disabilities in accessing high-quality education, tailored to their unique physical and learning needs. In addition to their personal gains, children with disabilities who succeed academically show their peers and communities what is possible when they have access to the education they need deserve.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
People with disabilities

Incorrect spiritual and cultural beliefs about disability often pose greater challenges for children with disabilities than their physical limitations. In the areas we work, many people do not expect children with disabilities to be productive members of society and some view them as cursed by witchcraft or God, which often results in their neglect, abandonment or even murder.When we facilitate discussions about disability, participants often develop a more accurate understanding of the causes of disability and the issues impacting children with disabilities. Many of these participants then work to teach others what they have learned and provide innovative strategies to make their communities more inclusive.Kupenda’s advocacy discussions and events have helped thousands of children with disabilities access the nutrition, education, medical care, and legal rights they deserve. Children who are healthy and fully included in all aspects of their communities also become a source of advocacy – they show others what is possible with appropriate support and adequate resources.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
People with disabilities

Kupenda helps children with disabilities access the medical care, equipment and supplies they need to reach optimal health and wellness. We work to ensure these medical services are high-quality, consistent, timely and tailored to the child’s unique needs. As part of this process, we also help families impacted by disability access caregiver training, transportation to facilities, and nutritional support.Each year, Kupenda’s advocacy efforts inspire more local leaders and organizations to take responsibility for funding and delivering medical care to children with disabilities in their communities. In recent years, the success of these local empowerment efforts have allowed Kupenda to shift more of our time and funding away from direct service delivery and more on advocacy for long-term, community-led solutions.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
People with disabilities

Where we work

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Kupenda (“love” in Swahili) for the Children equips children with disabilities to achieve their God-given potential through our 3 programs: - Advocacy - Education - Medical In collaboration with local leaders, Kupenda educates families and communities about the rights of children with disabilities and how to support them by advocating for their medical care, education, legal rights, and inclusion in all aspects of society. We also help children with disabilities access appropriate, high-quality education and medical services including surgeries, medications, and therapy. Our target population includes children and youth with any long-term disabilities (i.e., physical, cognitive, sensory and emotional health issues) and their families.

Advocacy: When the community leaders understand that children with disabilities deserve the same opportunities as people without disabilities, they provide innovative strategies to ensure these children have access to education, health and full inclusion in community life. Therefore, Kupenda teaches families and communities about the true causes of disability and what children with disabilities are capable of, when given opportunities. We do this through training workshops, large-scale public events, family counseling sessions, and our community resource center. Education: Consistent access to high-quality education gives children with disabilities life and career opportunities that otherwise would not be available to them. Kupenda supports this goal by providing special education teachers, school supplies, teacher trainings, construction of school facilities, and boarding school fees. Medical: Many of the families we work with do not have the resources needed to provide medical care for the children with disabilities in their care. In response, Kupenda provides funding, referrals and transportation to help children access the care they need, such as physical therapy, doctor visits, surgeries, medication, nutritional support, and equipment such as wheel chairs and hearing aids.

Since 1999, Kupenda for the Children and our Kenyan partner organization, Kuhenza for the Children’s Foundation, have improved the lives of thousands of children with disabilities in Kilifi County, Kenya and select regions of Tanzania, Zambia, and Sierra Leone. Our work to improve social and cultural views related to disability leads to proper implementation of disability legislation and actions that help children with disabilities access the education, health care and social inclusion they need to reach their greatest potential. This success is the result of Kupenda and Kuhenza’s work to strategically educate and empower spiritual leaders, as well as families impacted by disability and other stakeholders as effective disability advocates.

Kupenda tracks inputs, outputs, outcomes and impact across our Advocacy, Education and Medical Programs. Our evaluation process involves collecting annual progress reports from 200+ children in our Education and Medical programs and monthly reports from hundreds of parents community leaders in our Advocacy Program. Our Kenyan staff also develops monthly outcome reports for the 3 program areas. Each year, we supplement this data with qualitative beneficiary interviews.

Since 1999, Kupenda has been working with local leaders to help these children access the care and loving inclusion they deserve. Each year, Kupenda helps more than 10,000 children with disabilities access the care they need and provides disability justice training for more than 400,000 community leaders and residents.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

Financials

Kupenda for the Children
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Kupenda for the Children

Board of directors
as of 9/20/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Jeffery Gentry


Board co-chair

Ms. Lauren Blair

Adventures for the Cure

Term: 2019 - 2023

Jeff Gentry

Triangle Inc. (Director); The Gathering (Assistant Pastor); Empowering People for Inclusive Communities (EPIC); Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary; Lincoln Christian College

Patty Prasada-Rao

Martha’s Place (Program Director); Christian Community Development Association; New Song Urban Ministries; PRIA Ministries; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Johns Hopkins University

Cynthia Bauer

Army Environmental Center, Coordinator Christian Environmental Coalition, National Museums of Kenya, A Rocha Kenya, Eastern Kentucky University, University of Maine, ECCO Wildlife

Hillary Pember

Oliver Wyman, Bain & Company, Ohio Wesleyan University, Groton Community School, One Hen, Inc.

David McKay

MS Cure Foundation, Ropes and Gray, Christ Church Episcopal, Boston Bar Journal, Banking and Finance, Boston College Law School, Brown University, Hamilton College

Keita Wilson

University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Louisiana Department of Education, Howard University, Johns Hopkins University, Concordia University Portland

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/20/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/20/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Keywords

Kupenda ("love") for the Children, Kuhenza for the Children's Foundation, disability advocacy, child rights, inclusion