Natik Esperanza

Partnering with grassroots organizations

aka Natik   |   Fort Lauderdale, FL   |  www.natik.org

Mission

Natik facilitates collaboration between grassroots partners and emerging leaders in Guatemala and Mexico, with international supporters to overcome health, educational, and economic exclusion .

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Ms. Anita Jeannette Smart

Main address

2700 Mayan Drive

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316 USA

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Formerly known as

International Humanitarian Foundaiton

EIN

16-1650968

NTEE code info

Economic Development (S30)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problem our organization is working to address is educational and economic marginalization in the Mayan communities where we work in Guatemala and Mexico.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Puerta Abierta (Open Door) Library and Learning Center (Traveling Library

Puerta Abierta offers creative learning opportunities to Santiago Atitlán children Pre-K through 6th grade, after school enrichment programs, reading hours, homework help, and the traveling library, which spreads the joy of reading to the most remote parts of Santiago.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

MSV

Mujeres Sembrando la Vida is a cooperative of women living in and around the Tzotzil Mayan village of Zinacantan, Chiapas. Since the year 2000, they have worked collectively to cultivate their talents and improve their community.

The women employ their traditional patterns and skills to create beautiful one-of-a-kind, hand-woven and embroidered products, as well as custom orders for bedspreads, interior design textiles, bags, and computer carrying cases.

In addition to organizing product design workshops for its artisans, the cooperative has participated in reforestation efforts and the construction of low-smoke stoves, dry latrines, and rainwater capturing systems.

Mujeres Sembrando la Vida manages its own micro-savings and loan program to improve the fiscal solvency and financial literacy of its members.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
People of Latin American descent

Natik’s Scholarship Program invests in young, strong, visionary leaders and their families. We constantly challenge them to find innovative ways to confront generations of poverty and cultural violence through entrepreneurial ventures that will provide them with the financial capacity to invest in educational and economic opportunities in their own communities.

Ruk’ux Language and Cultural Immersion Enterprise uses the skill sets that the students learn at the technical high school, and is being created by them to help pay for their university educations. Ruk'ux means "heart in action" in Tz'utujil Maya, and will offer international students a selection of week or month long, volunteer work with local Santiago organizations, where they can learn new skills and polish the type of working vocabulary that most interests them. Participants live with local Santiago families, practice Spanish or Tz’utujil by way of a personal tutor during their volunteer work hours, have formal language classes, participate with the students in their reading circle, learn about the Mayan Cosmovision, and have the opportunity to participate in many other social and cultural activities that these youthful visionaries and leaders have organized for their international guests.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Indigenous peoples

Yo’onik Learning Center is an interactive learning environment that provides remedial education and scholarships to children in Zinacantán, Chiapas, Mexico. The center provides scholarships to secondary and preparatory school students in exchange for their help in facilitating classes and workshops for younger students. Yo’onik means “heart” in Tzotzil Mayan. The name was chosen for the learning center by the students.

The Center is now home to a remedial education for preschool and primary school students that is run by high school scholarship recipients. Mujeres Sembrando la Vida artisans have their meetings at Yo’onik. The center has a terraced, organic educational and demonstration garden on the hill behind the center. Yo'onik has partnered with various international funders to sponsor art, photography, video, technology, and english enrichment classes for local youth.

Yo’onik is currently raising money to complete their second floor.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

ANADESA—Asociación Nuevo Amanecer Santiago Atitlán (Association of the New Dawn Santiago Atitlán) is a grassroots organization that offers education programs for children and adults. They also have a work program for women that creates jewelry and shampoo, and facilitates food preparation for international visitors.

All of ANADESA’s programs center on improving education and creating economic opportunity. Their goal is to build capacity - to educate the people of Santiago Atitlán so they will be able to support themselves and live healthy, happy, enriching, and fulfilling lives.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Social and economic status
Indigenous peoples
Children and youth
Men and boys

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of non-monetary support contacts per grantee

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants in study abroad and exchange programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of grassroots organizations supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Natik Mission based goals contribute toward the elimination of extreme poverty through the following strategies:
1. Education:
a. Enrichment education for K-6th grade
b. Scholarships for middle and high school students
c. Adult and family community education
2. Economic Empowerment:
a. Entrepreneurial support for university students to help create ventures that will subsidize their university education
b. Entrepreneurial support for women that subsidize community well-being and education
3. Integration and Education of the Global Community
a. Board of Directors, Advisors, Fellows, Volunteers
b. Educational Institutions
c. Social justice religious and civic organizations
d. Donors

Natik Strategic Goals for 2018-2022

1. Institutional Strengthening through consolidating financial sustainability, developing professional staff, transforming the board and advisors into a more diverse and optimally representative group, formalizing administrative processes, and formalizing organizational evaluation processes

2 Increased “Transformative" Impact in the areas where we work through improved capacity for effective and responsible financial distribution to partners, and working to improve partner agency

3 Global Exchange Impact through improved capacity for effective outreach to donors and allies, increased institutional alliance relationships.

1. Anita Smart: Natik Executive Director with thirty years' bi-lingual and bi-cultural experience of living in Chiapas, Mexico, and working with development projects in Chiapas and Guatemala.
2. Will Kell: Natik Field Coordinator with strong bi-lingual, educational, and administrative skills, and an MA in Latin American History.
3. Natik's fifteen year relationship with groups in Santiago Atitlán Guatemala and Zinacantán, Chiapas, Mexico, which:
a. provides historic and cultural understanding.
b. lends locally perceived 'legitimacy' to our current involvement.
4. Long-term, personal relationship with all our partners, which permits the confidence and honesty necessary for the concepts and implementation of the programs to emerge from within the community.
5. The capacity to help students navigate the social, economic, bureaucratic, legal, and fiscal implications of being the first in their families and communities to have higher levels of formal education and successfully navigate the global marketplace.
6. An absolute conviction of the importance of a providing these exceptional communities the opportunity to cultivate educated, entrepreneurial, visionary leaders from within their own communities.

We have ten years of scholarship students, a community center, and successful artisan cooperative.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We changed our communication strategies with our donors and with our partners to focus on the typpes of information and formats that they found most useful. We also modified our support system for our partner's fundraising campaigns based on the feedback they gave us.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Natik Esperanza
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Natik Esperanza

Board of directors
as of 3/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bill Harvey

Wayfair

Term: 2020 - 2023

Libby O'Kane

Bill Harvey

Addison Nace

David Fuererbach

Devin Graves

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/19/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.