Educational Institutions

James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal

Raleigh, NC

This organization is a 501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation (This organization has notified the IRS of its intention to convert to a public charity, and the IRS has ruled that grantors and contributors may consider it a public charity for the purpose of making contributions to the organization.).

Mission

We promote excellence in college and university education in North Carolina and beyond. We conduct research and policy analysis of curricula, faculty research and teaching, student activities and scholarly achievement, governance, administrative policies, and non-academic operations. We also encourage excellence through leadership initiatives including student and faculty outreach and through communications with those influencing or making higher education policy.

Notes from the Nonprofit

The Martin Center notified the IRS of its intent to terminate its private foundation status and operate as a public charity beginning July 1, 2013. The Martin Center expects to be granted public charity status by the IRS in 2018.

Ruling Year

2004

President

Dr. Jenna A. Robinson

Main Address

353 E Six Forks Rd Ste 200

Raleigh, NC 27609 USA

Keywords

Higher education, policy, University of North Carolina, reform

EIN

16-1686283

 Number

5654989369

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

We promote knowledge, value, and the restoration of true liberal learning.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Commentaries

Clarion Call

Research Papers

Internship Program

Outreach

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of overall donors

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Includes President's reports

Number of list subscribers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Governance and emailed newsletters

Number of websites and organizations (outside of our organization) that share our resources and information

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Commentaries

Context notes

This includes organizations that have shared our information on social media.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

We want to help higher education get back on track. Increasingly, colleges and universities are failing to carry out their traditional responsibilities of preparing young Americans for leadership, citizenship, and personal achievement. Instead of maintaining rigorous academic quality, our schools are beset with non-curricular activities which all too often replacing self-discipline and serious study. Traditional core curricula have been swept away. Faculty course loads have been reduced. Many students sit in large lecture classes taught by neophyte graduate assistants. Yet the cost of college has been going up far faster than inflation. Tuition continues to rise dramatically, especially at public universities. Outstanding student loans have reached $1.2 trillion. Seventy-one percent of 2012 graduates had debt; the average class of 2015 graduate with student loan debt will have to pay back a little more than $35,000. We want to change that.

We seek to make the public aware of the problems and potential solutions. We seek to make North Carolina a model for national improvement, especially for public universities. We do this by affecting the decision-makers at universities (including legislators) and by informing students and their parents. We have “bottom-up" and “top-down" strategies. The “bottom-up" strategies include: • Informing parents, students, trustees, alumni, and taxpayers about actual learning on campus and how it can be improved • Educating those same groups about the use and impact of public funding, federal loans, and rising tuition • Acquainting students with ideas that are dismissed or marginalized on campuses today—such as respect for free enterprise and limited government The “top-down" strategies include: • Working with policymakers to show how education can be more effective and less costly. • Finding individuals who share a concern about higher ed and help them have an impact.

• We have five excellent writers and analysts who report on local and national activities and trends in higher education for the public. • We have an active website where we publish three commentaries per week; one of our staff members writes regularly for Forbes.com; we publish articles in local and national newspapers; we have testified before Congress. • We provide information directly to university governors, legislators, and the staff of the North Carolina governor and legislature. • We have an outstanding board, composed of a former governor, a current congresswoman, four business executives, three high-level executives in nonprofit organizations, and a retired NC Supreme Court Chief Justice. Three of our board members have Ph.Ds and another has an Ed.D. Four were directly involved in higher education as trustees, administration, or faculty.

We want to see our ideas stir debate locally and nationally; we want to see policy changes that improve colleges and universities.

To measure our impact, we regularly review our website and social media analytics, our articles and "mentioned" published outside our website, and comments from the public and policy-makers. We identify policy changes that we have had a role in. (Those include recent changes in the use of student health fees at UNC-Chapel Hill, in university policy on political speech, in legislation to protect student rights, a proposed congressional improvement in the Pell grant program, and measures taken by the UNC Board of Governors to improve its transparency.)

What we have accomplished: Within North Carolina, we have by our words and examples led to changes in university policy on political speech and the protection of student rights; we have aroused interest and concern among university governance about faculty workloads; we have stirred public reaction to the erosion of general education at the state's flagships schools; and we have changed university policy on the use of student fees. Nationally, we have made the public aware of problems with Pell grants, student loans, the overselling of higher education, and grade inflation. What we haven't accomplished: Too few policies have been changed in the UNC system; there is still a trend toward political correctness on campus; student debt and tuition keep rising; academic quality still seems to be declining, and grade inflation still occurs.

External Reviews

Financials

James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No