Mental Health Association of Portland

Speak up and speak out

aka Washington Recovery Services   |   Portland, OR   |  www.mentalhealthportland.org

Mission

Our task is to help persons with mental illness or addiction speak up and speak out – and to speak for those who cannot speak for themselves.

Ruling year info

2004

President

Sandra Chisholm MPA

Treasurer

Jeff Donohoe

Main address

PO Box 3641

Portland, OR 97208 USA

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EIN

20-0138570

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mental Health Alliance

The Mental Health Alliance amplifies the voices of people with mental illness, trauma, addiction, and alcoholism in public policy discussions.

The Mental Health Alliance was formed in 2018 to join the continuing Federal lawsuit, United States v. City of Portland as an amicus curie – or “friend of the court.”

Organizations which represent the interests of people with mental illness and have long participated in efforts to reduce police use of force used against people with mental illness – Disability Rights Oregon, the Oregon Justice Resource Center, the Portland Interfaith Clergy Resistance, and the Mental Health Association of Portland, joined together to form the Alliance. Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare was an initial member of the Alliance.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Advocates are included in the Mental health Alliance, attend a 90 minute meeting weekly, and participate in preparation of written and verbal testimony in Federal court.

Number of outreach attempts to reporters

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Mental Health Association of Portland routinely speaks with local and national reporters about homelessness, the experience of mental illness and addiction, about police reform and accountability.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Mental Health Association of Portland is Oregon’s impartial and independent advocate for persons with mental illness and addiction. Our task is to help persons with mental illness or addiction speak up and speak out – and to speak for those who cannot speak for themselves. It is a 501 C 3 nonprofit organization, tax identification 20-0138570, governed by peer volunteers since 2003. The organization maintains advisory councils and committees for individual educational and advocacy projects, and is a member of the Oregon Council for Behavioral Health.

Our advocacy experience is strong. In 2003 our advocacy at the Oregon State Hospital made the New York Times front page, won The Oregonian a Pulitzer, and launched an investigation which got the hospital rebuilt. Our advocacy on behalf of persons routinely harmed by law enforcement has been front page news since the death of James Chasse in 2006. Our advocacy has changed policies and procedures by patrol officers, jail deputies, prosecuting and defense attorneys, judges and court administrators. Our critically acclaimed and award-winning documentary film from 2014, Alien Boy: The Life and Death of James Chasse has been distributed internationally.

The organization provides education through the website and conferences. With links to over 20,000 articles and documents about mental illness and addiction in Oregon, it is perhaps the largest web site dedicated to mental health advocacy. The site is updated daily and has over 50,000 subscribers through email, Facebook, Twitter and an eventual reach of over 2.4 million per year.

The organization supports two national conferences to educate professionals and peers - the Law & Mental Health Conference, held annually in the Spring, and the Public Housing Conference, held annually in the Fall. The Mental Health Alliance and Washington Recovery Services are programs of the organization.

The organizations supports the Mental Health Alliance, a program of for additional organizations and 25 volunteers which provides subject matter expertise to the Federal court in US DOJ v City of Portland.

The organization provides additional one day events and trainings during the year in the Portland, Oregon area.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People with mental illness and addiction.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    MHAP began using post-conference online surveys to collect immediate responses to educational sessions.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It's a safe way for program participants to share critical comments or advice on how to improve programming.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Mental Health Association of Portland
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Mental Health Association of Portland

Board of directors
as of 04/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sandra Chisholm

Jason Renaud

Mental Health Association of Portland

Jeff Donohoe

CPA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.