Human Services

INTREPID FALLEN HEROES FUND

Healing Invisible Wounds

aka Armed Forces Family Survivors Fund

New York, NY

Mission

The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund serves United States military personnel experiencing the Invisible Wounds of War: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS). When our Servicemen and women return from the battlefield, we help them by building world class, advanced treatment centers, providing the best TBI and PTS care, and enabling them to continue to serve on active duty or enjoy a full civilian life.

Ruling Year

2004

President

Mr. David A. Winters

Main Address

One Intrepid Square W. 46th Street & 12th Avenue

New York, NY 10036 USA

Keywords

IFHF Military CFI NICoE

EIN

20-0366717

 Number

0248168423

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Blog

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-traumatic Stress (PTS) injuries dramatically increased among our military personnel following deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. With the increased use of hand-held explosive devices by the military, and there has been a continued rise in TBIs and PTS. n response, IFHF built the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) at Walter Reed Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. NICoE provides advanced research, diagnosis and treatment for TBI, PTS and related conditions. This success led to a plan to reach more soldiers closer to home. In 2012, IFHF began to build satellites on major military bases nationwide. These Centers have become game-changers, raising awareness of the seriousness of these invisible wounds and proving that prompt, effective treatment increases the chance for positive outcomes. Now, the military is triaging soldiers in the field. If a concussion is suspected, the soldier is sent directly for treatment.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post-program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

With the opening of each new Center, more soldiers are served, and an average 90 to 92% return to Active Duty.

Number of program graduates

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Most graduate the program. 90 to 92% return to Active Duty, others retire and anjoy a satisfying civilian life.

Number of participants engaged in programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Since the Centers opened, satisfaction remains at 95%.

Number of families who report that service and support staff/providers are available and capable of meeting family needs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Families across the span of Centers and the variable of each diagnosis, report a positive change in their family member following treatment.

Number of eligible clients who report having access to an adequate array of services and supports

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Over 97% report complete satisfaction with services and supports.

Number of treatment and support plans that include behavior support plan

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Military personnel

Related program

Intrepid Spirit Centers

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

All program aspects concentrate on improving behavioral issues impacted by Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS).

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Miracles happen because the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund (IFHF) has been making world-class treatment available to more soldiers and their families at Intrepid Spirit Centers. To date, seven Intrepid Spirit Centers are open on the following military bases: Fort Belvoir, VA; Camp Lejeune, NC; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Bragg, NC, Fort Hood, TX; Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Tacoma, WA, and Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, CA. Construction for the eighth Center is underway at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Opening is expected in May 2020. Two moer Centers are to be buit, one at fort Carson in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and the other at Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas. In 2019, the Centers that are operating saw over 200,000 new patient visits. More than 90% of those treated return to active duty. The Need: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS) and related health conditions affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of service members. More are injured but do not come forward due to shame or fear of losing respect or their position in the military. The stigma is being reduced, but some soldiers remain in the shadows, risking their lives by their shame and reluctance to admit the need for help. Concurrent with massive deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of thousands of soldiers have been diagnosed with TBI and PTS. Far more are affected but do not come forward due to shame or fear of losing respect or their position in the military. These battle scars, invisible to the naked eye, include the concussion resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), or shock from witnessing tragedy on the battlefield resulting in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Symptoms do not always appear immediately and months or years later the soldier is too often transformed in ways that may lead to grave consequences. The affected exhibit serious personality and neurological changes, mental instability, headaches, vision problems, delusions, fears, and other incapacities that alter their personalities and ruin their lives. TBI and PTS can impact a service member’s concentration, memory, ability to sleep or focus. They may experience pain, difficulty interacting with others and emotional distress, like panic attacks or flashbacks. It can lead to discharge from the armed forces and the inability to retain employment. It shatters families, and, ultimately, may lead to suicide. According to the Department of Defense, 2018 had the highest recorded number of suicides since they began tracking in 2012 with over 300 Active Duty, Reserves and National Guard service members taking their own lives. Women account for about 10% of the military population; female soldiers commit suicide 6 times more often than their civilian female counterparts. Our goal is to make treatment available to every soldier who needs treatment for injuries acquired in service to our nation..

Primary to our mission is to raise the funds and complete each Center’s construction on schedule and on budget. All funds come from private donors and 100% of every dollar raised goes to the project. To date, it takes about 12 months to raise funds to break ground and about 12 months for construction, depending on conditions at the site. Once complete, the Center is gifted to the Department of Defense for staffing, operations and management. Following the transfer of ownership of the Center, the military post constituency will assume responsibility and liability to preserve, maintain and restore the facility. Second, IFHF remains engaged in tracking the work of the Centers, makes regular site visits, participates in bi-annual all-Center summits that take place at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence in Bethesda, Maryland. The IFHF receives program updates, progress reports, testimonials, research and clinical information to ensure the original intent is maintained. Third, we monitor number of patients treated, recovery rates, and satisfaction surveys, which are consistently at 95%. Distinguishing factors of this project: To our knowledge, no other nonprofit organizations are raising the funds for and constructing state-of-the-art medical facilities dedicated to the treatment of the various injuries and afflictions incurred during military service. Thus, Intrepid Spirit Centers are filling a role that has been desperately needed and that no other institution before the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) Bethesda and the Intrepid Spirit Centers are as capable of delivering, acting in a timely manner and delivering the most advanced treatment available.

The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund has worked closely with Department of Defense leadership on the development of the Intrepid Spirit Center plan. Locations of the proposed Centers and their construction priority are agreed upon based on actual and projected patient need at each site. The following shows our progress and ability to continue to successfully meet our goals: Brief History: • 2000: Provided $20 million in grants to families of U.S. military heroes killed in action. • 2007: Built the Center for the Intrepid at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, a state-of-the-art, 65,000 square foot, $55 million rehabilitation facility to treat our Armed Forces suffering amputations and severe burns acquired in combat or in performing their regular duties. • 2010: Built the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) in Bethesda, MD, at Walter Reed Military Medical Center, a 72,000 square foot $60 million facility to provide research, diagnosis and treatment for TBI, PTS and related psychological health conditions. Today, NICoE is considered the Armed Forces’ core facility for the treatment of TBI. • 2012: Launched the Intrepid Spirit Center project to build satellites to NICoE across the country to reach more of our military in need of treatment closer to home. Seven are open, one is under construction and two more are planned. The building, at 25,000 square feet, is designed to work with the treatment. Architects met with actual patients to determine what factors in the environment works best. To reduce anxiety and improve balance and vision distortion caused by TBIs, walls are curved; the soothing quality of natural light improves balance and aids in relaxation. The Central Park feature is a circular glass-walled room that opens to a garden and playground for treatment, family, and relaxation from the rigorous treatment schedule.

The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund (IFHF) is uniquely capable of the successful execution of the Intrepid Spirit Center project as we have successfully completed several substantial construction projects: The National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) in Bethesda, Maryland, a $65 million 72,000 square foot facility; and the Center for the Intrepid, a $55 million 65,000 square foot physical rehabilitation Center in San Antonio, Texas; and seven Intrepid Spirit Centers. Each facility was completed on time and under budget and followed a formula similar to that of the NICoE and the Center for the Intrepid for project execution: IFHF raised the funds and managed construction of the facilities; upon completion, they were gifted to the Department of Defense for staffing and operation. The IFHF team has been consistent throughout these projects, each of which was spearheaded by Honorary Chairman Arnold Fisher, who brings a lifetime of building expertise to the Intrepid Spirit Center project. The IFHF model for these projects fills a gap in care provided by existing military medical systems, allowing for faster and more efficient project completion than would be possible within federal government bureaucratic and procurement systems.

Progress: • 2000: Provided $20 million in grants to families of U.S. military heroes killed in action. • 2007: Built the Center for the Intrepid at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, a state-of-the-art, 65,000 square foot, $55 million rehabilitation facility to treat our Armed Forces suffering amputations and severe burns acquired in combat or in performing their regular duties. • 2010: Built the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) in Bethesda, MD, at Walter Reed Military Medical Center, a 72,000 square foot $60 million facility to provide research, diagnosis and treatment for TBI, PTS and related psychological health conditions. Today, NICoE is considered the Armed Forces’ core facility for the treatment of TBI. • 2012: Launched the Intrepid Spirit Center project to build satellites to NICoE across the country to reach more of our military in need of treatment closer to home. Seven are open, one is under construction and two more are planned. The Board of Directors is working through the next steps following completion of the ten planned Intrepid Spirit Centers. With the success of this organization, the trustees believe we can move on to the next project with the same success.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: our staff, our board, our funders.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.

External Reviews

Financials

INTREPID FALLEN HEROES FUND

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/19/2019

Leadership

No data

Race & Ethnicity

No data

Gender Identity

No data

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

No data