Good Shepherd Ministries of Oklahoma

Health Is Priceless

aka Good Shepherd Clinic   |   Oklahoma City, OK   |  www.goodshepherdokc.org

Mission

Good Shepherd Clinic provides consistent, quality medical and dental services for the vulnerable members in our community.

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Mrs. Pam Timmons

Main address

222 NW 12th St

Oklahoma City, OK 73103 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

none

EIN

20-0526892

NTEE code info

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

Medical Disciplines (G90)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1977, Good Shepherd Ministries has provided a FREE health care home for low-income, uninsured Oklahomans. Medical services (primary and specialty referrals), full dental services, diabetic eye exams and free prescription medications. Nearly one in four people in Oklahoma County don’t have health insurance. Oklahomans have some of the worst rates of diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic illnesses making access to quality medical care so critical. We rely on donations to provide health care and do not receive any state, federal or insurance reimbursements. Our patients do not qualify for Medicaid and must fall below the 200% federal poverty level on income.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Good Shepherd Clinic

The Good Shepherd Medical and Dental Clinic offers free medical, dental and pharmacy care to the uninsured in central Oklahoman. The Clinic has increased hours of service to be open on a full-time basis. Offering quality, primary care services, the Clinic will become the medical home for thousands of medically uninsured adults. Referrals will be made to cooperating specialists, as needed.  Good Shepherd Ministries provides limited dental services to adults and children. Every Monday night during the school year, a limited number of adults may receive treatment for pain, extractions, and some emergency care. Every other Tuesday night, children may receive limited treatment. Appointments can be made by calling the clinic office after 9 a.m. on the day of service at (405) 232-8631. Our licensed pharmacist provides free prescription medications for the uninsured to ensure that medications are within reach of those who are in desperate need but cannot afford them. We also help patients enroll in Patient Assistance Programs to receive more expensive medications, at no cost to them.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People with disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2017

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteer health care providers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Good Shepherd Clinic

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Good Shepherd relies on volunteer physicians, dentists, hygienists, pharmacists, PA's, and healthcare students to provide services to our patients in the community who are uninsured and low-income.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Good Shepherd Clinic

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The majority of patients cared for at the Good Shepherd Clinic are struggling with chronic disease and major health problems.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Social determinates have a severe impact on their overall health, leaving them at risk for chronic diseases. Integrating concepts of compliance and adherence by adopting a more collaborative model of care emphasizing patient autonomy and choice. In this model of challenging diabetic patients to take control of their disease, health care providers can provide autonomy support to their patients to enhance their success at disease management behaviors. From the perspective of the health care delivery system, this model of collaborative or co-managed care emphasizes providers setting goals with their patients and providing ongoing support for optimal patient self-management behaviors over time.

The majority of patients cared for at the Good Shepherd Clinic are struggling with chronic disease and major health problems. Social and health system barriers such as poverty and a lack of health care providers affect the ability of poor and vulnerable populations to access and navigate specialty health care. These barriers can lead to patients either significantly delaying or discontinuing care or – worst of all – forgoing the care recommended for them.

We provide the following services:
• Primary Medical Care
• Medical Interpreters
• Dental Care
• Mental Health Treatment/Counseling
• Specialty Care such as Neurology, Dermatology, Audiology, Gynecology, and referrals
• X-ray Services, Lab and Diagnostic Tests
• CODA Diabetes Screening
• Nutrition/ Diabetes Cooking Classes and Education
• Prescription Medications & Supplies
• Diabetic Eye Exams & Glaucoma Exams

Just like food is a necessity to live a healthy life – providing access to medical care, medication and supplies and tools to self-manage their disease is just as important. Diabetes affects millions of people and it doesn’t discriminate, diabetes can hit when a person is least expecting it. It requires constant monitoring of blood glucose levels, proper medication treatment, whether this includes oral pills or insulin. Without the needed medications, it can lead to life-threatening complications such as neuropathy, heart attack, high blood pressure, kidney disease, stroke or glaucoma, or even worse it can lead to an early death. Proper blood glucose control is vital in preventing any long-term complications.

Our clinic relies on volunteer doctors, PAs, dentists, hygienists, nurses and students s to be able to provide the needed health care to the medically underserved and uninsured people in our community. We would not be able to provide for those in our community who are suffering if it were not for all the selfless volunteers who choose to help our patients.

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. Normally, the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach) releases insulin to help your body store and use the sugar and fat from the food you eat. Diabetes can occur when the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, or when the body does not respond appropriately to insulin. As yet, there is no cure. People with diabetes need to manage their disease to stay healthy.

The sociological and psychological impact of diabetes in a person’s daily life might increase the risk of emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. Therefore, even if diabetes isn’t a lethal disease, people with diabetes must take precautions and make the right decisions so they can keep enjoying a happy and functional life.

The good news is with the correct treatment and recommended lifestyle changes, many people with diabetes are able to prevent or delay the onset of complications. Thanks to the new tools, treatments, and applications on the market right now, diabetics can find it easier to stay on top of their health. This means they have a better chance of avoiding long-term complications and experience a better quality of life for years to come.

Diabetes Challenge: “Taking Control To Wellness” is a program to urge people with type 2 diabetes to work with their doctor to set and reach their A1C goal. This program also encourages effective behavioral interventions by understanding the why, how, and when patients do not engage in optimal diabetes self-management behaviors. Assessment of the reasons for lack of optimal self-care is important before embarking on specific behavioral interventions that may fail if specific regimen barriers are not understood and dealt with as part of the intervention.
This powerful initiative program is designed to encourage our 51 diabetic patients with life-threatening A1C levels to manage and control their disease. It is designed to inspire our patient's healthful habits at work, home and beyond. “Taking Control to Wellness” helps our providers and students educate and motivate patients to adopt healthful habits to reduce the impact of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-related illnesses. For some, it will mean fewer sick days and higher productivity. For others, it means looking and feeling better. For everyone, the result is empowerment—patients who are better able to control, delay or prevent diabetes. This Diabetes Challenge will include the following to improve their A1C levels, avoid serious health complications from uncontrolled diabetes and take control of their disease by providing:
Weight Management, nutritional food boxes, recipes and cooking demonstrations on, encouraging exercise, eye exams, medication and supplies, kidney function and nerve monitoring for neuropathy, monitoring and managing blood sugar levels and oral health care,

Working with care providers and students in a comprehensive care plan to help diabetic patients achieve their goals in managing their A1C levels, assess the risk of complications from the disease, changing behaviors, monitoring feet for wounds and sores, diet modifications, not smoking, getting recommended vaccinations — like flu shots — and support.

We have begun fundraising to purchase equipment for the eye exam clinic. Once the equipment is in place we will begin seeing patients in the eye clinic. This initiative will impact the delivery of health care to those living in poverty. Providing access to proper medical care and the tools to live a healthy lifestyle by lowering their blood sugar levels, people can live with diabetes and minimize its negative impact on themselves. Our programs extend to the improved quality of life of our patients and their families, reduce loss of work productively due to illness and benefits the larger community. Together, we are building a stronger and healthier community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We added a eye exam clinic, social services and nutrition education to our programs for our patients. We have put goals in place for three-year quality outcomes and measures in place for patient care.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Good Shepherd Ministries of Oklahoma
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Good Shepherd Ministries of Oklahoma

Board of directors
as of 1/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Karen Mata

The Boeing Company

Term: 2020 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mrs. Lan Miller

Delta Dental of Oklahoma

Term: 2019 - 2019

Sherry Rhodes

St Anthonys Foundation

Daniel McNeill

Northeastern University

Michael Fogarty

Retired, Oklahoma Health Care Authority

Paco Balderrama

Oklahoma City Police Department

Jane Jenkins

Dowtown Okc

David Greenwell

McGladrey Oklahoma

Randy Johnson

Arvest Bank

Karen Mata

Boeing Company

Lan Miller

Delta Dental of Oklahoma

Rick Lippert

Lippert Brothers

Jennifer Wilbourn

Dentist

Trent Willis

Cornerstone Insurance

Scott Stewart

Cox Business

Peter Vatli

JP Morgan

Vince Venincasa

Deam McGee Eye Institute

Dennis Hogle

Diagnostic Laboratory of Oklahoma

Julie Allison

Chase Business Banking

Andrew Bowles

First Baptist Church OKC Missions Minister

Jack Geurkink

Carr Healthcare Realty

Mary Jenkins

Attorney at Law

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.