PLATINUM2024

McShin Foundation

Healing Families & Saving Lives

Richmond, VA   |  www.mcshin.org

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Mission

Founded in 2004, The McShin Foundation is a full-service Recovery Community Organization (RCO) committed to serving individuals with substance use disorders as well as their families. While providing housing and the tools for recovering individuals to create positive lifestyles, we aim to spread the word of recovery and educate families, communities, and government regarding SUDs as well as reduce the negative outlook attached to them. McShin is the only RCO in Virginia accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Peer Recovery Support Services (CAPRSS).

Notes from the nonprofit

McShin provides housing, food, peer-to-peer recovery support services, jail recovery programs, family programming, trainings, daily multiple pathways to recovery groups, and an authentic approach to helping those with addiction as a whole. McShin’s intensive residential program provides individuals with safe housing, full days of relapse prevention and recovery education, and linkage to clinical services including medical detox, addiction psychiatry, and individual therapy. Each program participant is assigned a recovery coach that guides them on their new path of recovery. Program participants have access to outings & events on the weekends. McShin’s housing allows for structure, focus, & a sense of community to be constant elements of recovery. We now have a pregnant and parenting women's recovery home.

Ruling year info

2005

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Honesty Liller

Main address

2300 Dumbarton Road

Richmond, VA 23228 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-1327278

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The biggest problem is the negative outlook on addiction as a whole. Our community has gotten better about speaking up about addiction and recovery, but there is still so much work to be done. It is a proven fact that peer to peer recovery support services saves lives. Our data shows that we are reducing that negative outlook and helping a lot of humans. Our mission is to keep fighting and keeping the authentic peer to peer recovery services in our area.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Program

The McShin Foundation offers housing by having 160 beds in sixteen VARR certified recovery residences for individuals in various stages of recovery.   Those who come to McShin for housing have usually exhausted all of their resources, and we work to help them get their lives back. Housing is paramount for the first thirty days of recovery as it is during this critical period when the greatest inroads can be made into building a recovery foundation, especially for those with a history of relapse. Most individuals need a far lengthier stay to achieve the road to recovery and look to McShin to facilitate and provide the support necessary for their continued sobriety. They will have access to our staff that are all in recovery from addiction themselves, our recovery center, and our daily multiple pathways for recovery groups. We now have a pregnant and parenting women's recovery home.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Adults
Incarcerated people
Homeless people

The Virginia Recovery and Re-Entry Project (VRR) is by McShin. McShin provides the tools for recovering individuals to create positive lifestyles and lasting change.

Beginning on September 30, 2018, the VRR Project facilitated programs for 20 hours a week in Riverside Regional Jail in Petersburg VA, and 6 hours a week in Rappahannock, Shenandoah, Warren Regional Jail (RSW) in Front Royal, VA.

Since 2021, McShin is now in RSW Jail and Pamunkey Regional Jail (Hanover Co.)delivering peer-to-peer recovery support services.

Participants in the VRR Project are required to adhere to a structured schedule and curriculum while incarcerated. They follow a specific set of rules that they helped create and attend groups facilitated by other peers who are in long-term recovery. Participants are exposed to anger management, coping skills, 12-step literature, recovery-related videos, and journaling exercises.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people
Substance abusers

The women have access to McShins every day Peer Recovery Support Services. The peer-based recovery support services at McShin Foundation provide comprehensive support for all four stages of recovery: 1) pre-recovery engagement; 2) recovery initiation and stabilization; 3) recovery maintenance; and 4) enhancement of quality of life in long-term recovery. With partnerships in the community there are parenting classes, access to clothes, and additional baby/children needs. This home allows for structure, focus, and a sense of community to be constant elements of recovery. Compounding issues also include difficulty securing employment, ongoing reconciliation with family, financial insecurity, and mounting court costs, all of which must be addressed while achieving and maintaining recovery in a high-stress environment. Our organization implements a social-model recovery program that implements peer-to-peer delivered Recovery Support Services.

Population(s) Served
Single parents
Women
Infants and toddler girls
Infants and toddler boys
Ex-offenders

Where we work

Accreditations

CAPRSS 2020

Awards

The Best Local Podcast (Get In The Herd) 2020

Richmond Times-Dispatch

Jean C. Harris Award (Honesty Liller) 2019

Hanover Community Service Board

Heroes Amongst Us (Jesse Wysocki & Bob DeTriquet) 2018

CBS 6

Emerging Nonprofit Leadership Program (Honesty Liller) 2017

The Community Foundation

Young Nonprofit Professionals Great Boss Award (John Shinholser) 2017

YNPN

National Recovery Month 2017

SAMHSA

Kaleo Cares Award 2016

Kaleo

NACo Achievement Award 2015

NACo

National Recovery Month Award 2013

SAMHSA

National Recovery Month Award 2012

SAMHSA

Joel Hernandez Award 2011

Faces and Voices of Recovery

Alumni Association 2007

Rubicon, Inc

Remarkable Women 2020 (Honesty Liller) 2020

WRIC-8 ABC News

Visionary Leadership Award (John Shinholser) 2022

VSIAS

House Resolution No. 738 2021

VA General Assembly

Affiliations & memberships

CAPRSS 2019

Virginia Association of Recovery Residences (VARR) 2012

Association of Recovery Community Organizations 2008

Faces and Voices of Recovery 2004

Virginia Association of Addiction Professionals (VAAP) 2010

SAMHSA 2012

SAMHSA 2013

SAMHSA 2017

Richmond Times Dispatch 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, Incarcerated people, Veterans, Young adults, Older adults

Related Program

Housing Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients engaged in the criminal justice system in the last 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Substance abusers, Adults, LGBTQ people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2023 indicates of those 587 that resided in our housing in the year 2023

Number of clients who achieve and maintain abstinence from alcohol and drugs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Results are based off of Alumni tracking during 2020-2023. Numbers only account for those that have answered our contact efforts. Those we are unable to contact are not accounted for in these numbers.

Number of readmissions to the same/similar or higher level of care within 90 days

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals who exited McShin Foundation and returned within 90-days of initial exit.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Ex-offenders, Substance abusers, Adults, Veterans

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals who identified as being homeless upon intake into the McShin Foundation afforded safe and stable housing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To continue to help those with addiction and their families. The need for recovery support services is really prevalent in our community and across the nation. McShin's impact has saved thousands thus far since opening in 2004. Our main goal is to still help people the day they ask for it. We hope to put an end to overdoses and deaths related to addiction. Also, we maintain existing structure and quality of the Recovery Community Organization. Through this existing program, we are aiming to address common barriers of Substance Use Disorders. As a community, we can do it together!

McShin started with 3 recovery homes, we now have 13 homes for those with addiction. The biggest strategy we have is to keep our services we provide safe, authentic, and real for those that seek our help. We implement programs all the time at McShin when we see a need in the community to fill. Such programs are jail recovery programs, family programming, job training, and regular life skills.

McShin has a great board of directors, staff, and supporters. We provide a program like no other in our area with many services needed for those with addiction. We have 125 recovery beds that can be filled on any day or time of the week for those seeking help. McShin is operated by a 26-person staff and directed by a 14-member non-profit Board of Directors, creating a diverse but cohesive community of support. In addition, our 13 recovery residences are each managed by a house leader and assistant house leader, providing increased accountability and stability for our residential participants. These residences are all state and nationally-certified recovery residences. All staff members are in recovery, peer leaders, and are certified recovery coaches through NAADAC approved Recovery Coach Training Curriculum.


In 2021, McShin’s Alumni tracking efforts made contact with 391 Alumni who exited between 2018-2021. As of January 2022, of those we contacted:​
· 63% report being engaged in recovery​
· 59.5% report being employed​
· 61% report that they have not been arrested since leaving McShin

· 498 total participants accessed recovery housing in the fiscal year​
· 395 new participants served​
· 170 new intensive program participants​
· 225new sober living participants​
· 9,877 indigent nights funded​
· 86 intensive program scholarships awarded ​
· 95 individuals received REVIVE! Naloxone and Overdose Training​
· 179 individuals completed the 16-hour Recovery Coach & Peer Leadership Training​
90% of new individuals were unemployed upon intake. 82% gained employment while living in housing.​
We assisted 97 individuals in obtaining Medicaid​
We assisted 139 individuals in obtaining SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)​
Provided safe housing to 92 individuals who identified as being homeless upon intake​

So, we are certainly making an impact in our community

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, After they leave it is difficult sometimes to find them

Financials

McShin Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

McShin Foundation

Board of directors
as of 06/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mike Kelly

Alumni/Recovery/Hurricane Fence

Term: 2023 - 2025

Mike Kelly

Hurricane Fence

Dusty O'Quinn

Family Member of Alum

Virginia Hall

Recovery Community

Marshall Tucker

Recovery Community

Lisa Bennett

Family Advocate

Andrea Wright

Recovery Community/Legal

Debbie Rosenbaum

Family Recovery

Michael Beaudet

Advocate

Dr. Stephen Popovich

Doctor

David Dunston

Hatcher Church

Lesley Davis

AJCCPAS

Fay Chelmow

Impact Virginia

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/31/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.