The Library Project

Education is Change

PHOENIX, AZ   |  https://www.library-project.org

Mission

The Library Project donates books and libraries to rural elementary schools, orphanages and community centers in Asia.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director & Founder

Tom Stader

Main address

2509 E RIDGE CREEK RD

PHOENIX, AZ 85024 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-1347443

NTEE code info

Libraries, Library Science (B70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Rural elementary schools, orphanages and community centers in Asia often do not have the basic educational infrastructure for a library. For that reason, The Library project focus on three areas. 1) Donating beautiful rural elementary school, orphanage and community center libraries. 2) Conducting Librarian Training for teachers and administrators. 3) Providing children's literacy programs to get children excited about reading and foster a culture of reading.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Elementary School Libraries

The Library Project donates local language libraries to improve children’s literacy. Children gain access to a beautiful school library providing fun and interesting children’s books that spark their imagination and promote a lifelong love of reading. Having fun educational books easily available helps to encourage independent learning, intellectual curiosity, and a lifelong passion for reading. The books that we donate are 100% age appropriate local language children’s books; books that children get excited about reading.

Population(s) Served

All of our library donations have a teacher training component. This course covers how to properly loan books to students, how to use the children’s books in a classroom setting, and how to get the students involved in the maintenance of their library.
We have found that when we conduct a teacher training course, 94% of our libraries are used on a daily-to-weekly basis during the first year. These are the kinds of results that everyone at The Library Project is so proud of.

Population(s) Served

Literacy programs have one simple focus; to get children excited about reading. Once a library is in place, it is essential to properly introduce children to a world filled with books. Literacy programs are also a time to introduce the teachers and administratorson how best to get children excited about their new library. This is a big reason why our libraries are used on day-one.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Elementary School Libraries

Context Notes

These results track the total programs implemented per year at The Library Project; library donations, teacher training, and children's literacy programs.

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Teacher Training

Context Notes

teachers that were directly or indirectly trained by The Library Project at rural elementary schools, orphanages and community centers.

Number of students and children impacted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Elementary School Libraries

Context Notes

Students and children impacted by our library donation program.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Library Project donates books and libraries to rural and urban elementary schools, orphanages and community centers in Asia. We currently operate in Mainland China and Vietnam. Our organization is aiming to accomplish one single thing; improve children's literacy. We accomplish this in three very specific manners.

1) Providing access to local language libraries.

2) Teacher training on library maintenance.

3) Conduct children's literacy programs.

Teachers are important

The simple fact is this: teachers are the single factor that determines if a library will be used when our team leaves. Teachers matter, their comfort level with understanding what this new tool is in their school matters, how this new tool is going to help them educate the children they work with every day matters, and how this tool fits into the national education system is critical matters. When reviewing our past Monitoring & Evaluation reports we saw a clear coloration to teachers and library success. For that reason we spent years updating our focus on teacher training at each and every one of our library donations.

A well-maintained library is a well-used library. Four years ago when we conducted our first Monitoring & Evaluation report we noticed that there were no schools that scored “A" that didn't keep a well-maintained library. This implies that a well kept and well-organized library is a library that gets used. Who maintains libraries at a rural primary school? Teachers. A few simple facts are teachers in rural primary schools are (arguably) overworked, underpaid and taking on more than just a teaching role at the schools they work at. We needed to empathize with the enormity of a teacher's every day challenges and that they might not view this library through the same eyes as we do. For that reason we changed.

Specifically, we spent thousands of hours refocusing our teacher-training component on Library Management. On “day-one" we wanted to provide the teachers the tools necessary to manage their library effectively. This has translated into results that we could not of imagined four years ago. 100% of schools scoring “A" “B" and “C" have a well-maintained library. 100% of schools that scored “A" maintained checkout records, and 87% of schools conduct daily to weekly reading activities. Also, not one school scored “F" this year; we only had one “D".

Since 2006, The Library Project team has donated 2,500 libraries impacting more than 1,000,000 children. We have two program offices based out of Xi'an, China and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. These offices engage with local governments and communities throughout China and Vietnam.

We conduct pre-assessments of schools, orphanages and community centers. Once we understand the need, we seek out funding, and return with a library, teacher training and literacy programs. Each donation receives one-year of monitoring, evaluation and support.

Our Results

At The Library Project we believe that measuring our impact is incredibly important. It provides data so that we can continually improve our programs. We also believe it is important to communicate, both the successes and challenges, that we face to those that support us.

Over 1,000,000 children impacted

To date, we have impacted over one million children through providing access to libraries in their rural primary schools. The beautiful thing about a school library is it lives, it stays just a relevant on day one as it will ten years into the future. Because of this new children annually gain access to these beautiful libraries and the total impact a library has on a community grows annually.

Over 33,000 teachers impacted

Training is critical to the long-term success of a library donation. Teachers at rural primary schools and administrators at orphanages all receive training on how to manage their new library. This training course is the first day of a one-year relationship between The Library Project team that ensures each and every library we donate operates at the highest level. Training is a critical part of every library donation.

Over 2,500 literacy programs conducted

It is not enough to just provide libraries, it is critical to work directly with the children. We take the necessary time to introduce the children to their new library, talk to them about the importance of reading, and how each book is a window to another world. At the end of each literacy program the children understand that this new library will be open to them and they will be able to check books out for overnight reading. Children are always very excited.

Financials

The Library Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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The Library Project

Board of directors
as of 06/27/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tom Stader

The Library Project

Term: 2006 -

Neal Beatty

Control Risks

Philip McCrea

Red Nucleus

Donn Garton

Resident Vietnam

Kent Kedl

Control Risks

Amanda Yiu

Facebook

Paul Mauerman

Self Employed

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes