Business Council For Peace, Inc.

More Jobs Mean Less Violence.

aka Bpeace   |   Southampton, NY   |  www.bpeace.org

Mission

Bpeace (Business Council for Peace) believes the path to peace is lined with jobs. We work with entrepreneurs in crisis-affected communities to scale their businesses, create significant employment for all and expand the economic power of women. More jobs mean less violence.®

Ruling year info

2006

CEO

Ms. Alexandra Salas

Main address

26 Hill Street #257

Southampton, NY 11968 USA

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EIN

20-1602122

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

International Exchanges (Q23)

Management Services for Small Business/Entrepreneurs (S43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

THE FACT: The majority of jobs around the world are created by small and medium-size businesses that lift families and communities. THE PROBLEM: In crisis-affected communities, a good job is the difference between joining a gang, illegal migration, or a lifetime of poverty and exclusion. THE BPEACE SOLUTION: Provide small and medium-size business leaders, especially women, access to volunteer business experts who help them grow and create much-needed jobs. The Business Council for Peace (Bpeace) is an award-winning nonprofit working in crisis-affected communities to grow small and medium-size businesses, create significant employment for all, and expand the economic power of women. More jobs mean less violence.®

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

El Salvador Fast Runner Entrepreneurs

Increasing jobs in El Salvador has proven to be a strong deterrent to the spread of gang violence. Bpeace unites high-quality business consulting by international volunteers (“Skillanthropists”) with proven and promising local job creators (“Fast Runners”) to help these business owners break through the barriers to growth and job creation. Our partners in this region include USAID and the Argidius Foundation.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Women and girls

The issues in Guatemala are complex and include gang violence, child malnutrition, poverty and social exclusion. Bpeace unites high-quality business consulting by international volunteers (“Skillanthropists”) with proven and promising local job creators (“Fast Runners”) to help these business owners break through the barriers to growth and job creation. Our partners in this region include USAID and the Argidius Foundation.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Women and girls

Black-owned businesses are more than twice as likely as their white counterparts to have shuttered due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with similar rates for Latino and Asian-owned businesses.

Bpeace Skillanthropists are working with Black, Latino, Asian and women-led small and medium-size business owners to ensure the U.S. rebuilds in a more inclusive and equitable way.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Multiracial people
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Hidden Heroes Award 2009

Andrew Goodman Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

Greatnonprofits 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annually, Bpeace surveys the current and former entrepreneurs in our program to determine how our efforts have increased employment and revenue into local communities.

SME Revenue Growth

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annually, Bpeace surveys the current and former entrepreneurs in our program to determine how our efforts have increased employment and revenue into local communities.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In crisis-affected communities, Bpeace stimulates job creation and the economic empowerment for women.

We create jobs and help small and medium-size businesses grow by pairing them with volunteer business experts.

We deliver high-quality customized business consultingg through volunteer business experts we call “Skillanthropists,” to carefully vetted small and medium-size businesses we call “Fast Runners.”

Together we are in pursuit of a common vision; we believe that employment is the bridge to education, poverty reduction, improved health and ultimately less violence; and that jobs for women are vital to women’s advancement and to elevating their peaceful influence on society.

Our Core Strategy:

In crisis-affected communities, accelerate the ability of business owners, especially women, to create local jobs.

Bpeace business volunteers provide advice to help local high-potential businesses in crisis-affected countries grow and create jobs, especially for women, and build a stable future for their workers and communities.

Successful Operating Model:

Bpeace unites high-quality business consulting by international volunteers (“Skillanthropists”) with proven and promising local job creators (“Fast Runners”) to help these business owners break through the barriers to growth and job creation. More jobs mean less violence.

Bpeace is the leading community of high-impact job creators.

Bpeace is powered by 400+ Skillanthropist volunteer business experts from companies including ZS Associates, FrontierView, Trusted Media, PwC, IBM, Amazon, Estee Lauder, IPG Health, ExCo Group, Nike and Barclays, as well as independent consultants. These volunteers consistently give Bpeace 5-stars—the highest rating—on Greatnonprofits.

Either remotely or in person, Skillanthropists address challenges presented to them by U.S., Salvadoran, Guatemalan and Lebanon job creators—well vetted through Bpeace’s proven Maximizer methodology. Bpeace has a valued track record of selecting local job creators with the best characteristics to embrace and implement change and the ambition to grow and create jobs, especially for women. Skillanthropists tell us they can see the impact they are making and feel valued for their perspective and experience.

More than 41,000 family members in four countries are supported by 10,500+ Fast Runner employees. Through the strong partnerships Bpeace has forged with the Argidius Foundation and USAID, and the continuous improvement of our job creation services Maximizer and Women Forward, Bpeace is on a glide path to doubling the number of families we can impact.

The Bpeace model produces substantial and sustainable change. Small and medium-size businesses that participate in Bpeace programs over-perform their local economies.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Small and medium-size business owners in crisis-affected communities. International business experts who volunteer with us.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Video interviews,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Business Council For Peace, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Business Council For Peace, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Fleming

Toni Maloney

Bpeace

Randy Browning

Liz Wald

Mark Fleming

Longacre Advisors LLC

Karen Vander Linde

ExCo Group

Marla Gitterman

Ann Callison

Barclays

Angela Scalpello

Alpa Pandya

James Jones

Sabrina Prince

IPG Health

Alexandra Salas

Bpeace

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.