GOOD JOURNEY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Good Journey ...developing young leaders, providing skills, experiences, opportunities and encouragement for success

aka Good Journey   |   Saint Louis, MO   |  www.goodjourney.org

Mission

Good Journey Development Foundation's mission is to support and build sustainable communities and young leaders who take responsibility for the improvement of our communities, and promote cultural understanding that contributes to the betterment of society.

Notes from the nonprofit

Good Journey Development Foundation continues to grow and is looking forward to making capacity building changes that strategically propel Good Journey into the Future and connect us more deeply to the people, community and work!

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Ms. Dionne Ferguson

Main address

5046 Vernon Avenue

Saint Louis, MO 63113 USA

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EIN

20-1615870

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Community Our World

Youth community leaders are created. Young people are actively involved in working to improve our communities and their individual circumstances by taking part in a cultural exchange experience and participating in self-awareness, educational, career, and community development projects.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People of African descent

Young people participate in cultural-based, interactive, character and skill building activities. They engage in thought-provoking discussions to provide opportunities to express independent and collective perspectives while confidently expressing their identity. Young people play games that promote critical decision making and an understanding of related consequences. Young people gain Life Skills to use on their Good Journey.

Population(s) Served
Students
Incarcerated people

This 7 to 8 weeks long academy uses art, fun interactive games and engaging activities in the community to teach communications and social skills, and improve children’s understanding and value of the treasures in their own community, while also preparing them to be community leaders. The Summer Leadership Academy also focuses on entrepreneurship, career awareness and community involvement. Some of the fun activities include learning Ki-Swahili, art, dance, treasure hunts, history, storytelling, life skills, science, mathematics, poetry and field trips.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The purpose of Good Journey’s ART IN OUR WORLD is to expand the St. Louis community’s exposure to African Art and art making, and provide opportunities for cultural learning and exchange between visiting artists and the St. Louis community. There are 3 main program components: (1) a two-week exhibition of visiting artists' works, (2) youth serving as exhibition docents, (3) art lessons/workshop for youth and families to learn a new art form and skill and (4) artist lecture/community dialogue.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Children and youth

A multi-week healing art program in which young people explore trauma, oppression, emotions, resiliency, the ability to develop self-care, to develop community care, and ability to positively project internally and externally through the creation of art. The guiding artist challenges young people in their work on art projects that speak to who they are and what they feel, while the guiding counselor/therapist helps them learn to communicate their experiences in ways that reinforce and build upon their humanity to create space for healing, and positively engage with community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Young men

Good Journey partners with TEACH and health facilitators in YCOSAE to develop young leaders who understand factors, conditions, circumstances, and situations that build unbalanced societal structures leading to unhealthy behaviors, attitudes, and perspectives. Through multi-week sessions and stress relieving field experiences, young people learn to focus this understanding on self-healing and community education. Additionally, Adult Community Influencers (i.e., parents, teachers, community activists, law enforcement) receive trauma awareness and restorative justice training. Through YCOSAE, young people receive hands-on training, utilizing innovative, engaging, and relatable methods and approaches resulting in their learning to recognize, realize and actualize. YCOSAE also develops young leaders who are social change agents through multi-week, field experiences and controlled exercises and actions. Through YCOSAE, young people receive hands-on training, utilizing the Nguzo Saba, an African value system, and the history of Black organizing as foundation to actualize young people’s beliefs into action by learning to plan, organize, execute, and assess for change.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Young adults
People of African descent
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people

LIVE Black Youth Corps is Good Journey’s new project and encompasses developing and implementing, with Black youth, a curriculum and movement that includes: empowerment through the eradication of internalized racism and inferiority; understanding the history of racism and where we are today; building strategies to address internalized inferiority of Black peers and authorities in youth spaces; building strategies to address internalized superiority of white peers and authorities in youth spaces; adult community advocate support training; organizing a movement for change; advocating for policy change; expressing self and community care in racist moments; building resiliency and operating to resist; and building faith in self, community and a movement.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
People of African descent
Young adults
People of African descent
Preteens

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Good Journey Development Foundation's aim is to create young leaders who have personal success, are leaders with their families, schools, and contribute to make their communities better. Good Journey's aim is to aid in the development of young leaders and change agents who think and act globally.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The people we serve are majority Black youth, ages 8 to 25, and their families. We also engage neighbors and community members.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our Summer Leadership Academy was a virtual experience for 2020. We included some movement and dance to ensure our youth experienced some physical activity. Our youth responded that it was not enough. In 2021 Summer Leadership Academy will be implemented utilizing a hybrid format, including in-person and virtual programming. Because we listen to our youth, we will include more physical and outdoor activities in 2021. Spending more time outdoors will also be a part of our COVID19 safety plan.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We are an organization that operates by consensus, so the people we serve are used to being a part of the decision making.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

GOOD JOURNEY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GOOD JOURNEY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 4/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Nikki Smith

Edward Jones

Donell Whitfield

Retired Social Service Executive

Iris Ferguson

Retired 22nd Associate Circuit Court Judge

Denise Cage

Nonprofit Director

Carlton Mitchell

Exodus Gallery

Nikki Smith

Edward Jones

Bisa Adero

College Student

Haile Emerson

High School Student

Heaven Uhuru

High School Student

Dionne Ferguson

Good Journey Development Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/30/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.