Project Schoolhouse

aka Educational Programs for the International Community   |   Austin, TX   |  www.projectschoolhouse.org

Mission

Project Schoolhouse builds educational opportunities in developing countries.
 
Through investment in schools, teachers, and students, Project Schoolhouse works to help rural communities in developing countries to better advocate for themselves in changing regional economics and political systems.  With an emphasis on community building and local volunteer participation, Project Schoolhouse partners with with recipient communities to build new schools, provide clean water, and improve sanitation.

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Selina Serna

Main address

PO Box 609

Austin, TX 78767 USA

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EIN

20-1705489

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Rural (S32)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In rural Nicaragua where we work, the vast majority of communities have no access to safe water or adequate school buildings. Families drink from surface water that is contaminated and often causes endemic health issues. In addition, functioning latrines are not commonplace, as families typically use uncovered, overflowing holes in the ground or resort to open defecation. This burden disproportionately affects women and children as they are often tasked with collecting water from remote drainage ditches and streams. When Project Schoolhouse responds to a community's request for support, we commit to leaving families empowered with their own in-home improved water source, and sanitary latrine and a functional school building for their children. With these basic facilities secured, women will have more time to pursue occupational ambitions outside of the home, while children are able to attend school consistently and spend a sufficient amount of time preparing for their future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Constructing Elementary Schools

Project Schoolhouse helps communities build schools. We work in places where a new school could be the first structure ever built from concrete. It serves as the heart of the community and represents a place of learning and community gatherings. A new school can be a source of enormous community pride.

In communities where we work, existing schools are ramshackle affairs. They are small, old, leaky, wet, and dirty. Often 40 or so children will be crammed into a building no larger than an average bedroom in the USA. When it rains, water enters the classroom, turns the dirt floor to mud, and completely disrupts the learning process.

Students and teachers distracted by mud, rain, and overcrowding find it difficult to do their jobs of learning and teaching. Dry, secure, spacious classroom environments greatly benefit developing communities and can mean the difference between learning or not.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people with improved water access

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Project Schoolhouse collaborates with families of Nicaraguan rural communities to build improved school, water and sanitation infrastructure. Our financial contributions source local supplies and technical expertise, while communities volunteer all of the labor to bring clean water and latrines to every home, and build an elementary school for each child. With a sustained focus on fundraising and partnership, we aim to increase the number of projects completed each year. Additionally, we are collaborating with community volunteers to implement programs aimed at addressing child learning gaps and encourage school retention through provision of enrichment opportunities in the primary schools.

We have a multi-pronged approach to increasing the provision of clean water, sanitation and educational infrastructure. We are working to increase the level of funding obtained via our own fundraising efforts in various giving channels, expansion of partnerships and sharing of expertise with others interested in learning how to implement gravity-fed water systems. We have also grown our local team to support our school retention initiatives.

Our investment in US fundraising efforts are taking off. We continue to invest in local capacity building to support increased project and program implementation, efficacy and effectiveness. The Project Schoolhouse team is embedded in the communities in which we work, allowing us to quickly scale construction as our funding grows. The community advocacy and building skills that are a direct, positive outcome of each of our prior projects heightens the awareness of our work within the region and adds to the pipeline of future projects.

To date, we have helped 15 communities transform their lives; 2300 people have safe water in their homes and 1700 children study in schools we've helped them build. We are proud of the expansion of our work over the years from single projects in one community annually, to multiple projects in several communities each year. Moving forward, we will stewards and expand partnerships with foundations, organizations and individuals whose funding priorities align with our work, sustaining the growth of these life-changing projects.

Financials

Project Schoolhouse
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Project Schoolhouse

Board of directors
as of 3/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gene Bosche

Thomas Barker

Cheryl Barker

Selina Serna

JP Kloninger

Gene Bosche

Evan Lambert

Amit Motwani

Dennis Passovoy

Kris Sloan

Sara Wagner

Kristen Palmer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data